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Your search for courses for 23/SP and with code: POSI-DSS2 found 10 courses.

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EUST 159.00 "The Age of Isms" - Ideals, Ideas and Ideologies in Modern Europe 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 233

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 65072

Paul Petzschmann

"Ideology" is perhaps one of the most-used (and overused) terms of modern political life. This course will introduce students to important political ideologies and traditions of modern Europe and their role in the development of political systems and institutional practices from the mid-nineteenth century to the present. We will read central texts by conservatives, liberals, socialists, anarchists and nationalists while also considering ideological outliers such as Fascism and Green Political Thought. In addition the course will introduce students to the different ways in which ideas can be studied systematically and the methodologies available.

POSC 201.00 Statecraft and the Tools of National Power 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

HASE 105

MTWTHF
8:15am10:00am8:15am10:00am
Synonym: 65556

Jon R Olson, Ross L Wilson, Thomas R Hanson

This course covers the science and art of statecraft, which is the application of the tools of national power. Students will study how nations use diplomatic, economic, and military power to achieve stated national policy objectives. The course is team-taught by three career national security professionals. Case studies are used to assess the application of diplomatic, economic, and military power in the real world. Course readings, papers, and significant classroom discussion will deliver content to students and set the stage for the International Strategic Crisis Negotiation Exercise, which is a graded part of the course.

POSC 210.00 Misinformation, Political Rumors, and Conspiracy Theories 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

HASE 105

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 65123

Christina E Farhart

Why do people believe in conspiracy theories, hold on to misinformed beliefs even in the face of mounting evidence to the contrary, and/or spread political and social rumors that may have little basis in fact? Who is most vulnerable to these various forms of misinformation? What are the normative and political consequences of misperceptions (if any)? This course explores the psychological, political, and philosophical approaches to the study of the causes, consequences, and tenacity of conspiracy beliefs, misinformation, and political rumors, as well as possible approaches that journalists could employ to combat misperceptions.

POSC 214.00 Visual Representations of Political Thought and Action 3 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

HASE 109

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 65476

Barbara Allen

Visual media offer an alternative method of framing political ideas and events. Images found in such texts as film, posters, and even in statistical tables can enlighten--or mislead. Readings in visual theory, political psychology, and graphic representation will enable you to read images and use these powerful media to convey your ideas and research.

1st 5 weeks

POSC 244.00 The Politics of Eurovision 3 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

HASE 105

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 65125

Dev Gupta

At first glance, Eurovision, the decades-long, continent-wide singing contest, is nothing more than a mindless pop culture event. Dismissed as a celebration of (at best) mediocre music, Eurovision seems like it would be the last place to learn about serious politics. In this class, however, we will explore Eurovision as a place where art is deeply political and often engages in debates about gender and sexuality, race, the legacies of colonialism, war and revolution, nationalism, and democracy—not just within the context of the competition itself but how these discussions spill over into broader social and political dynamics.

1st 5 weeks

POSC 279.00 The Promise of Civil Society: A Global Perspective 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

HASE 109

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 66089

Huan Gao

Today, we are often encouraged to be civically engaged and to associate in order to improve our society. Even in authoritarian regimes where free associations are limited, they are seen as a force for human rights and progress. So how do our associations, ranging from neighborhood watch groups to international NGOs, contribute to changing the world? This course will examine civic associations to address some of the most pressing global issues, such as climate change, inequality, and epidemics. We will delve into classic literature on civil society, analyze contemporary organizations and movements, and evaluate their political, social, and economic impact. This course incorporates engagement with local NGOs; students should expect 6-8 hours of community work over the term.

Extra Time Required

POSC 294.07 Central and Eastern European Politics Program: Perceptions of Otherness in Modern Eastern and Central Europe 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Synonym: 63921

Mihaela Czobor-Lupp

Is nationalism fundamentally flawed in its inclusionary capacity? Can the same power of imagination to bring strangers together, which made nation-building possible, be deployed for inventing post-national forms of solidarity? The course will explore representations of strangers and foreigners in Central and Eastern Europe, throughout the nineteenth and twentieth century, with a special focus on Roma and Jews. The aim will be to understand how these representations will work to legitimize different forms of exclusionary politics. An important part of the course will explore the role that exiled and displaced people can play in reimagining identities on a cosmopolitan level.

Participation in Carleton OCS Central & Eastern Europe

POSC 295.07 Central and Eastern European Politics Program: Nation-Building in Central and Eastern Europe between Politics and Art 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Synonym: 63922

Mihaela Czobor-Lupp

The state and its cultural politics played a pivotal role in building the Romanian nation. The first part of the course will analyze the difficulties of nation-building in modern Romania, with a special emphasis on the incapacity of Romanian liberalism to prevent the rise of extreme right wing politics. The second part will explore different images of Romanian national identity that art provided both during the communist regime and in the post-1989 decades, also in a comparative perspective with Hungary, Bulgaria, and Serbia. The course will include visits to galleries, architectural sites and neighborhoods in Bucharest and its surroundings.

Participation in Carleton OCS Central & Eastern Europe

POSC 296.07 Central and Eastern European Politics Program: Challenges to the Nation-State in Eastern and Central Europe: Immigrants and Minorities 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Synonym: 63923

Mihaela Czobor-Lupp

How do democracies react when confronted with massive bodies of immigrants? Do the problems that Eastern and Central European countries face in dealing with immigrants reflect deeper challenges to their capacity of thinking of the nation along inclusionary lines? We will explore the legal and political issues that EU countries and their societies, particularly, in Eastern and Central Europe, face when confronted with a migration crisis. Then we will look at Roma’s history of exploitation and injustice in Eastern and Central Europe. The course will include visits with community groups and NGOs, as well as encounters with minority rights activists.

Participation in Carleton OCS Central & Eastern Europe

POSC 302.00 Subordinated Politics and Intergroup Relations* 6 credits

Christina E Farhart

How do social and political groups interact? How do we understand these interactions in relation to power? This course will introduce the basic approaches and debates in the study of prejudice, racial attitudes, and intergroup relations. We will focus on three main questions. First, how do we understand and study prejudice and racism as they relate to U.S. politics? Second, how do group identities, stereotyping, and other factors help us understand the legitimation of discrimination, group hierarchy, and social domination? Third, what are the political and social challenges associated with reducing prejudice?

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Courses or labs meeting at non-standard times may not appear when searching by class period.
Requirements
You must take 6 credits of each of these.
Overlays
You must take 6 credits of each of these,
except Quantitative Reasoning, which requires 3 courses.
Special Interests