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Your search for courses for 23/SP and with Overlay: QRE found 105 courses.

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AFST 220.00 Color, Class, and Status in Black America 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 202

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 65631

Daniel Williams

As a racial category and identity, "Black" is often treated in a homogenous, monolithic way, obscuring the internal diversity and inequality within the black population in the U.S. In this course, we consider the inequalities within black communities and the black population living in the U.S., historically and through to the present. "Colorism," or skin tone stratification, represents one status linked to class and ranking in society; but does colorism matter more than other statuses to class? Class differences are in fact profound within black communities, and they are correlated to multiple social statuses--skin tone, immigrant status, national origin, and even political orientation. We will examine how these status, color, and class interact, and how they shape class relations and tensions, lived experience, and notions of authenticity ("blackness") in everday life and popular culture. Course topics include the Black middle class; education; neighborhood segregation; gender and sexuality; and media representations and popular culture.

ASTR 113.00 Observational and Laboratory Astronomy 3 credits, S/CR/NC only

Open: Size: 12, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Olin 141

MTWTHF
9:00pm11:59pm
Synonym: 64133

Valerie Fox

Theory and practice of basic techniques in observational and laboratory astronomy. Certain problems involve the use of the 16-inch and 8-inch telescopes.

Prerequisite: Astronomy 100, 110, 127, 232, 233, Physics 226, 228, 232, 233 or instructor permission

S/Cr/NC only

ASTR 233.00 Astrophysics II 6 credits

Open: Size: 18, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Olin 102

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 64134

Cindy A Blaha

A study of galactic and extragalactic astronomy with an emphasis on the physical principles underlying the observed phenomena. Topics include the structure and dynamics of the Milky Way Galaxy and other galaxies, the interstellar medium, quasars and active galaxies, clusters and superclusters, and cosmology.

Prerequisite: Physics 228 or 231 or instructor permission

Cross-listed with PHYS 233.

Cross-listed with PHYS 233.00

BIOL 125.53 Genes, Evolution, and Development and Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 18, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Olin 149 / Hulings 103

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
2:00pm6:00pm
Synonym: 65400

Debby R Walser-Kuntz, Rika E Anderson, Amanda K Hund

Emphasizes the role of genetic information in biological systems. Under this theme, we cover subjects from the molecular to the population levels of organization, including genetics, structure/function of DNA, gene expression and regulation, the changing genetic makeup of species as they evolve, and the development of individual organisms from zygotes. The active learning format of this course allows time in class to apply new concepts with faculty present. Students enter Carleton from a wide variety of academic experiences and our introductory courses are designed to provide a level playing field for students regardless of previous science background.

Sophomore Priority with two spots held for upperclass students

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: BIOL 125.WL3 (Synonym 65403)

BIOL 125.54 Genes, Evolution, and Development and Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 18, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Olin 149 / Hulings 103

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am1:00pm5:00pm9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 65401

Debby R Walser-Kuntz, Rika E Anderson, Annie L Bosacker

Emphasizes the role of genetic information in biological systems. Under this theme, we cover subjects from the molecular to the population levels of organization, including genetics, structure/function of DNA, gene expression and regulation, the changing genetic makeup of species as they evolve, and the development of individual organisms from zygotes. The active learning format of this course allows time in class to apply new concepts with faculty present. Students enter Carleton from a wide variety of academic experiences and our introductory courses are designed to provide a level playing field for students regardless of previous science background.

Sophomore Priority with two spots held for upperclass students

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: BIOL 125.WL4 (Synonym 65404)

BIOL 125.59 Genes, Evolution, and Development and Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 18, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Olin 149 / Hulings 103

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am8:00am12:00pm9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 65402

Debby R Walser-Kuntz, Rika E Anderson, John L Berini

Emphasizes the role of genetic information in biological systems. Under this theme, we cover subjects from the molecular to the population levels of organization, including genetics, structure/function of DNA, gene expression and regulation, the changing genetic makeup of species as they evolve, and the development of individual organisms from zygotes. The active learning format of this course allows time in class to apply new concepts with faculty present. Students enter Carleton from a wide variety of academic experiences and our introductory courses are designed to provide a level playing field for students regardless of previous science background.

Sophomore Priority with two spots held for upperclass students

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: BIOL 125.WL9 (Synonym 65405)

BIOL 125.63 Genes, Evolution, and Development and Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 2, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Olin 149 / Hulings 103

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
2:00pm6:00pm
Synonym: 65722

Debby R Walser-Kuntz, Rika E Anderson, Amanda K Hund

Emphasizes the role of genetic information in biological systems. Under this theme, we cover subjects from the molecular to the population levels of organization, including genetics, structure/function of DNA, gene expression and regulation, the changing genetic makeup of species as they evolve, and the development of individual organisms from zygotes. The active learning format of this course allows time in class to apply new concepts with faculty present. Students enter Carleton from a wide variety of academic experiences and our introductory courses are designed to provide a level playing field for students regardless of previous science background.

Upperclass students waitlist on BIOL 125 WL3

BIOL 125.64 Genes, Evolution, and Development and Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 2, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Olin 149 / Hulings 103

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am1:00pm5:00pm9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 65723

Debby R Walser-Kuntz, Rika E Anderson, Annie L Bosacker

Emphasizes the role of genetic information in biological systems. Under this theme, we cover subjects from the molecular to the population levels of organization, including genetics, structure/function of DNA, gene expression and regulation, the changing genetic makeup of species as they evolve, and the development of individual organisms from zygotes. The active learning format of this course allows time in class to apply new concepts with faculty present. Students enter Carleton from a wide variety of academic experiences and our introductory courses are designed to provide a level playing field for students regardless of previous science background.

Upperclass students waitlist on BIOL 125 WL4

BIOL 125.69 Genes, Evolution, and Development and Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 2, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Olin 149 / Hulings 103

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am8:00am12:00pm9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 65724

Debby R Walser-Kuntz, Rika E Anderson, John L Berini

Emphasizes the role of genetic information in biological systems. Under this theme, we cover subjects from the molecular to the population levels of organization, including genetics, structure/function of DNA, gene expression and regulation, the changing genetic makeup of species as they evolve, and the development of individual organisms from zygotes. The active learning format of this course allows time in class to apply new concepts with faculty present. Students enter Carleton from a wide variety of academic experiences and our introductory courses are designed to provide a level playing field for students regardless of previous science background.

Upperclass students waitlist on BIOL 125 WL9

BIOL 126.52 Energy Flow in Biological Systems and Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 18, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Olin 149 / Hulings 115

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm1:00pm5:00pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 65407

Raka M Mitra, Daniel Hernández, David Hougen-Eitzman

Emphasizes the role of energy flow (acquiring, storing, and using energy) in biological systems. Under this theme, we cover subjects from the molecular to the population levels of organization, including structure/function of proteins and enzymes, transport of molecules within biological systems, and links between organismal physiology and ecosystem function. The active learning format of this course allows time in class to apply new concepts with faculty present. Students enter Carleton from a wide variety of academic experiences and our introductory courses are designed to provide a level playing field for students regardless of previous science background.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 123 or 128

Sophomore Priority.

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: BIOL 126.WL2 (Synonym 65410)

BIOL 126.53 Energy Flow in Biological Systems and Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 18, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Olin 149 / Hulings 115

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
2:00pm6:00pm
Synonym: 65408

Raka M Mitra, Daniel Hernández, Mike T Nishizaki

Emphasizes the role of energy flow (acquiring, storing, and using energy) in biological systems. Under this theme, we cover subjects from the molecular to the population levels of organization, including structure/function of proteins and enzymes, transport of molecules within biological systems, and links between organismal physiology and ecosystem function. The active learning format of this course allows time in class to apply new concepts with faculty present. Students enter Carleton from a wide variety of academic experiences and our introductory courses are designed to provide a level playing field for students regardless of previous science background.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 123 or 128

Sophomore Priority.

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: BIOL 126.WL3 (Synonym 65411)

BIOL 126.54 Energy Flow in Biological Systems and Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 18, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Olin 149 / Hulings 115

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:00pm5:00pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 65409

Raka M Mitra, Daniel Hernández

Emphasizes the role of energy flow (acquiring, storing, and using energy) in biological systems. Under this theme, we cover subjects from the molecular to the population levels of organization, including structure/function of proteins and enzymes, transport of molecules within biological systems, and links between organismal physiology and ecosystem function. The active learning format of this course allows time in class to apply new concepts with faculty present. Students enter Carleton from a wide variety of academic experiences and our introductory courses are designed to provide a level playing field for students regardless of previous science background.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 123 or 128

Sophomore Priority.

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: BIOL 126.WL4 (Synonym 65412)

BIOL 126.62 Energy Flow in Biological Systems and Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 2, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Olin 149 / Hulings 115

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm1:00pm5:00pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 65725

Raka M Mitra, Daniel Hernández, David Hougen-Eitzman

Emphasizes the role of energy flow (acquiring, storing, and using energy) in biological systems. Under this theme, we cover subjects from the molecular to the population levels of organization, including structure/function of proteins and enzymes, transport of molecules within biological systems, and links between organismal physiology and ecosystem function. The active learning format of this course allows time in class to apply new concepts with faculty present. Students enter Carleton from a wide variety of academic experiences and our introductory courses are designed to provide a level playing field for students regardless of previous science background.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 123 or 128

Upperclass students waitlist on BIOL 125 WL2

BIOL 126.63 Energy Flow in Biological Systems and Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 2, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Olin 149 / Hulings 115

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
2:00pm6:00pm
Synonym: 65726

Raka M Mitra, Daniel Hernández, Mike T Nishizaki

Emphasizes the role of energy flow (acquiring, storing, and using energy) in biological systems. Under this theme, we cover subjects from the molecular to the population levels of organization, including structure/function of proteins and enzymes, transport of molecules within biological systems, and links between organismal physiology and ecosystem function. The active learning format of this course allows time in class to apply new concepts with faculty present. Students enter Carleton from a wide variety of academic experiences and our introductory courses are designed to provide a level playing field for students regardless of previous science background.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 123 or 128

Upperclass students waitlist on BIOL 125 WL3

BIOL 126.64 Energy Flow in Biological Systems and Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 2, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Olin 149 / Hulings 115

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:00pm5:00pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 65727

Raka M Mitra, Daniel Hernández

Emphasizes the role of energy flow (acquiring, storing, and using energy) in biological systems. Under this theme, we cover subjects from the molecular to the population levels of organization, including structure/function of proteins and enzymes, transport of molecules within biological systems, and links between organismal physiology and ecosystem function. The active learning format of this course allows time in class to apply new concepts with faculty present. Students enter Carleton from a wide variety of academic experiences and our introductory courses are designed to provide a level playing field for students regardless of previous science background.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 123 or 128

Upperclass students waitlist on BIOL 125 WL4

BIOL 240.00 Genetics 6 credits

Open: Size: 48, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 305

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 64195

Stephan G Zweifel

A study of the transmission of genetic information between generations of organisms, and of the mechanism of expression of information within an individual organism. The main emphasis will be on the physical and chemical basis of heredity; mutational, transmissional and functional analysis of the genetic material, and gene expression.

Prerequisite: Biology 125 and 126 or instructor permission

Sophomore Priority, requires concurrent registration in Biology 241

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: BIOL 240.WL0 (Synonym 64196)

BIOL 356.00 Seminar: Topics in Developmental Biology 6 credits

Closed: Size: 0, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Olin 102

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 64204

Jennifer M Ross-Wolff

The development of an embryo from a single cell to a complex body requires the coordinated efforts of a growing number of cells and cell types. In this seminar course, we will use primary literature to explore recent advances in our understanding of the cellular processes such as intercellular signaling, migration, proliferation, and differentiation that make development possible. Additionally, we will consider how these developmental cellular processes, when disrupted, lead to cancer and other diseases. Priority will be given to juniors and seniors who have not already taken a seminar course.

Prerequisite: Biology 240, Biology 280 or Biology 342

Waitlist only

BIOL 363.00 Seminar: Ecomechanics 6 credits

Closed: Size: 0, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Olin 104

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 64208

Mike T Nishizaki

All organisms, from Common loons to Redwood trees to Basking sharks spend much of their lives bumping up against forces associated with the non-biological world. The manner in which ecological challenges are solved (e.g., moving around vs. staying put, finding food, avoiding predators) is often related to an individual’s biomechanical design. This class will challenge students to view their physical surroundings from the perspective of an organism. How do mussels feed in a fast stream vs. stagnant pond? Why do healthy trees uproot rather than break in half? How can a sea urchin with no eyes “see”? We will use primary scientific literature to examine the physical principles that underlie fundamental ecological processes.

Prerequisite: Biology 125 and 126 and one additional 200 or 300 level Biology course or instructor permission

BIOL 372.00 Seminar: Structural Biology 6 credits

Closed: Size: 0, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Olin 06

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 64209

Rou-Jia Sung

The ability to visualize macromolecules at atomic detail has significantly advanced our understanding of macromolecular structure and function. This course will provide an overview of fundamental experimental methodologies underlying structure determination, followed by primary literature-based discussions in which students will present and critically discuss classic foundational papers as well as examples from the current literature that have advanced our understanding of macromolecule structure and function.

Prerequisite: Biology 125 and 126; and either Biology 280, Biology 380, Biochemistry 301 or Chemistry 320

CGSC 233.01 Laboratory in Cognitive Processes 2 credits

Open: Size: 12, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Olin 11

MTWTHF
2:00pm5:00pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 65660

Cross-listed with PSYC 233. Students will participate in the replication and planning of empirical studies, collecting and analyzing data relevant to major cognitive phenomena. A grade of C- or better must be earned in both Psychology/Cognitive Science 232 and 233 to satisfy the LS requirement.

Prerequisite: Concurrent registration in Cognitive Science 232; Psychology 110, Cognitive Science 100, Cognitive Science 130 or permission of the instructor

CGSC 232 required. Cross listed with PSYC 233.

CGSC 233.02 Laboratory in Cognitive Processes 2 credits

Open: Size: 12, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Olin 11

MTWTHF
2:00pm5:00pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 65661

Cross-listed with PSYC 233. Students will participate in the replication and planning of empirical studies, collecting and analyzing data relevant to major cognitive phenomena. A grade of C- or better must be earned in both Psychology/Cognitive Science 232 and 233 to satisfy the LS requirement.

Prerequisite: Concurrent registration in Cognitive Science 232; Psychology 110, Cognitive Science 100, Cognitive Science 130 or permission of the instructor

CGSC 232 required. Cross listed with PSYC 233.

CHEM 123.52 Principles of Chemistry I and Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 24, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Olin 141 / Anderson Hall 223

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm1:00pm5:00pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 64467

Rachel E Horness

An introduction to chemistry for students who have strong high school preparation in chemistry or who have taken Chemistry 122. Topics include the electronic structure of atoms, periodicity, molecular geometry, thermodynamics, bonding, equilibrium, reaction kinetics, and acids and bases. Each offering will also focus on a special topic(s) selected by the instructor. Students cannot receive credit for both Chemistry 123 and 128.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 122 or placement via Chemistry Placement Exam (see Chemistry Department webpage)

CHEM 123.57 Principles of Chemistry I and Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 24, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Olin 141 / Anderson Hall 223

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm8:00am12:00pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 64468

Rachel E Horness

An introduction to chemistry for students who have strong high school preparation in chemistry or who have taken Chemistry 122. Topics include the electronic structure of atoms, periodicity, molecular geometry, thermodynamics, bonding, equilibrium, reaction kinetics, and acids and bases. Each offering will also focus on a special topic(s) selected by the instructor. Students cannot receive credit for both Chemistry 123 and 128.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 122 or placement via Chemistry Placement Exam (see Chemistry Department webpage)

CHEM 128.00 Principles of Environmental Chemistry and Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 24, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Olin 141 / Anderson Hall 223

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:00pm5:00pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 64480

Will Hollingsworth

The core topics of chemistry (i.e. thermodynamics, kinetics, equilibrium, and bonding) are central to understanding major environmental topics such as greenhouse warming, ozone depletion, acid-rain deposition, and general chemical contamination in air, water, and soil. These topics and the chemical principles behind them are addressed through an emphasis on the earth's atmosphere. One four-hour laboratory per week. Because this course covers the major topics of Chemistry 123 (but with an environmental emphasis), students cannot receive credit for both Chemistry 123 and 128.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 122 or placement via Chemistry Placement Exam (see Chemistry Department webpage)

CHEM 224.54 Principles of Chemistry II and Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 24, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 329 / Anderson Hall 229

MTWTHF
8:30am9:40am8:30am9:40am1:00pm5:00pm8:30am9:30am

Other Tags:

Synonym: 64469

Deborah S Gross

A more advanced study of several core introductory chemistry principles. This course is suitable for students with advanced placement in chemistry or students who have completed Chemistry 123 or 128. Topics include coordination chemistry, advanced bonding models, spectroscopy, advanced acid/base and redox equilibria, and electrochemistry. The topics will be taught from varying perspectives using examples from biochemistry, the environment, energy, or materials chemistry. The lab will focus on developing computational, quantitative, and synthetic skills and will prepare students for more advanced laboratory work in chemistry.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 123 or Chemistry 128

CHEM 224.59 Principles of Chemistry II and Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 24, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 329 / Anderson Hall 229

MTWTHF
8:30am9:40am8:30am9:40am8:00am12:00pm8:30am9:30am

Other Tags:

Synonym: 64470

Deborah S Gross

A more advanced study of several core introductory chemistry principles. This course is suitable for students with advanced placement in chemistry or students who have completed Chemistry 123 or 128. Topics include coordination chemistry, advanced bonding models, spectroscopy, advanced acid/base and redox equilibria, and electrochemistry. The topics will be taught from varying perspectives using examples from biochemistry, the environment, energy, or materials chemistry. The lab will focus on developing computational, quantitative, and synthetic skills and will prepare students for more advanced laboratory work in chemistry.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 123 or Chemistry 128

CHEM 234.54 Organic Chemistry II and Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 22, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Olin 149 / Anderson Hall 321

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm1:00pm5:00pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 64471

Kate A Sammons

The chemistry of functional groups is continued from Chemistry 233, and is extended to the multifunctional compounds found in nature, in particular carbohydrates and proteins. The laboratory focuses upon inquiry-based projects and spectroscopic analysis. One laboratory per week.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 233

CHEM 234.57 Organic Chemistry II and Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 22, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Olin 149 / Anderson Hall 321

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm8:00am12:00pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 64472

Kate A Sammons

The chemistry of functional groups is continued from Chemistry 233, and is extended to the multifunctional compounds found in nature, in particular carbohydrates and proteins. The laboratory focuses upon inquiry-based projects and spectroscopic analysis. One laboratory per week.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 233

CHEM 348.00 Introduction to Computational Chemistry 6 credits

Open: Size: 12, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 329

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 64481

Daniela L Kohen

This class will introduce students to computational chemistry with a focus on simulations in chemistry and biology. This course will include hands-on experience in running classical molecular dynamics and quantum chemistry programs, an introduction to methods to simulate large systems, and demonstrations of the use of more sophisticated software to simulate chemical and biological processes. It will also include a survey of the current literature in this area, as well as lecture time in which the background necessary to appreciate this growing area of chemistry will be provided.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 343 and 344 or consent of the instructor; Concurrent registration in Chemistry 349

CHEM 349 required

CHEM 349.01 Computational Chemistry Laboratory 2 credits

Open: Size: 6, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Olin 310

MTWTHF
1:00pm5:00pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 64482

Daniela L Kohen

Credit for the laboratory portion of Chemistry 348.

Prerequisite: Concurrent registration in Chemistry 348

CHEM 348 required

CHEM 349.02 Computational Chemistry Laboratory 2 credits

Open: Size: 6, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Olin 310

MTWTHF
1:00pm5:00pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 64483

Daniela L Kohen

Credit for the laboratory portion of Chemistry 348.

Prerequisite: Concurrent registration in Chemistry 348

CHEM 348 required

CHEM 349.03 Computational Chemistry Laboratory 2 credits

Open: Size: 6, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Olin 310

MTWTHF
8:00am12:00pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 64484

Daniela L Kohen

Credit for the laboratory portion of Chemistry 348.

Prerequisite: Concurrent registration in Chemistry 348

CHEM 348 required

CHEM 349.04 Computational Chemistry Laboratory 2 credits

Open: Size: 6, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Olin 310

MTWTHF
8:00am12:00pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 64485

Daniela L Kohen

Credit for the laboratory portion of Chemistry 348.

Prerequisite: Concurrent registration in Chemistry 348

CHEM 348 required

CHEM 351.00 Inorganic Chemistry 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 329

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 64473

Matt T Whited

Symmetry, molecular orbital theory and ligand field theory will provide a framework to explore the bonding, magnetism and spectroscopic properties of coordination complexes. Topics in reactivity (hard and soft acids and bases), bioinorganic chemistry, reaction mechanisms, and organometallic chemistry, will also be introduced.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 224 and 234

CHEM 352.01 Laboratory in Advanced Inorganic Chemistry 2 credits

Open: Size: 6, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 325

MTWTHF
1:00pm5:00pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 64474

Matt T Whited

Synthesis, purification and spectroscopic characterization of transition-metal complexes with an emphasis on methods for preparing and handling air-sensitive compounds. One laboratory per week. 

Prerequisite: Concurrent or previous registation in Chemistry 351

CHEM 351 required.

CHEM 352.02 Laboratory in Advanced Inorganic Chemistry 2 credits

Open: Size: 6, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 325

MTWTHF
8:00am12:00pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 64475

Matt T Whited

Synthesis, purification and spectroscopic characterization of transition-metal complexes with an emphasis on methods for preparing and handling air-sensitive compounds. One laboratory per week. 

Prerequisite: Concurrent or previous registation in Chemistry 351

CHEM 351 required.

CS 111.01 Introduction to Computer Science 6 credits

Open: Size: 34, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Olin 310

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 64304

Richard Wells

This course will introduce you to computer programming and the design of algorithms. By writing programs to solve problems in areas such as image processing, text processing, and simple games, you will learn about recursive and iterative algorithms, complexity analysis, graphics, data representation, software engineering, and object-oriented design. No previous programming experience is necessary. Students who have received credit for Computer Science 201 or above are not eligible to enroll in Computer Science 111.

CS 111.02 Introduction to Computer Science 6 credits

Open: Size: 34, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Olin 310

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 64305

Sneha Narayan

This course will introduce you to computer programming and the design of algorithms. By writing programs to solve problems in areas such as image processing, text processing, and simple games, you will learn about recursive and iterative algorithms, complexity analysis, graphics, data representation, software engineering, and object-oriented design. No previous programming experience is necessary. Students who have received credit for Computer Science 201 or above are not eligible to enroll in Computer Science 111.

Sophomore Priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: CS 111.WL2 (Synonym 64307)

CS 111.03 Introduction to Computer Science 6 credits

Open: Size: 34, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Olin 310

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 64306

Amy Csizmar Dalal

This course will introduce you to computer programming and the design of algorithms. By writing programs to solve problems in areas such as image processing, text processing, and simple games, you will learn about recursive and iterative algorithms, complexity analysis, graphics, data representation, software engineering, and object-oriented design. No previous programming experience is necessary. Students who have received credit for Computer Science 201 or above are not eligible to enroll in Computer Science 111.

Sophomore Priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: CS 111.WL3 (Synonym 64308)

CS 201.01 Data Structures 6 credits

Open: Size: 34, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 329

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 64309

Kiran Tomlinson

Think back to your favorite assignment from Introduction to Computer Science. Did you ever get the feeling that "there has to be a better/smarter way to do this problem"? The Data Structures course is all about how to store information intelligently and access it efficiently. How can Google take your query, compare it to billions of web pages, and return the answer in less than one second? How can one store information so as to balance the competing needs for fast data retrieval and fast data modification? To help us answer questions like these, we will analyze and implement stacks, queues, trees, linked lists, graphs, and hash tables. Students who have received credit for a course for which Computer Science 201 is a prerequisite are not eligible to enroll in Computer Science 201.

Prerequisite: Computer Science 111 or instructor permission

Sophomore Priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: CS 201.WL1 (Synonym 64311)

CS 201.02 Data Structures 6 credits

Open: Size: 34, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Olin 310

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 64310

Richard Wells

Think back to your favorite assignment from Introduction to Computer Science. Did you ever get the feeling that "there has to be a better/smarter way to do this problem"? The Data Structures course is all about how to store information intelligently and access it efficiently. How can Google take your query, compare it to billions of web pages, and return the answer in less than one second? How can one store information so as to balance the competing needs for fast data retrieval and fast data modification? To help us answer questions like these, we will analyze and implement stacks, queues, trees, linked lists, graphs, and hash tables. Students who have received credit for a course for which Computer Science 201 is a prerequisite are not eligible to enroll in Computer Science 201.

Prerequisite: Computer Science 111 or instructor permission

CS 304.00 Social Computing 6 credits

Open: Size: 32, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

CMC 306

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 65457

Sneha Narayan

The last decade has seen a vast increase in the number of applications that connect people with one another. This course presents an interdisciplinary introduction to social computing, a field of study that explores how computational techniques and artifacts are used to support and understand social interactions. We will examine a number of socio-technical systems (such as wikis, social media platforms, and citizen science projects), discuss the design principles used to build them, and analyze how they help people mobilize and collaborate with one another. Assignments will involve investigating datasets from online platforms and exploring current research in the field.

Prerequisite: Computer Science 201

CS 314.00 Data Visualization 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 235

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 64318

Eric C Alexander

Understanding the wealth of data that surrounds us can be challenging. Luckily, we have evolved incredible tools for finding patterns in large amounts of information: our eyes! Data visualization is concerned with taking information and turning it into pictures to better communicate patterns or discover new insights. It combines aspects of computer graphics, human-computer interaction, design, and perceptual psychology. In this course, we will learn the different ways in which data can be expressed visually and which methods work best for which tasks. Using this knowledge, we will critique existing visualizations as well as design and build new ones.

Prerequisite: Computer Science 201

ECON 110.01 Principles of Macroeconomics 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Willis 204

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20am3:20am

Other Tags:

Synonym: 64638

Victor Almeida

This course gives students a foundation in the general principles of economics as a basis for effective citizenship and, when combined with 111, as a preparation for all advanced study in economics. Topics include analysis of the measurement, level, and distribution of national income; the concepts of inflation and depression; the role and structure of the banking system; fiscal and monetary stabilization techniques; implications of and limits to economic growth; and international economic relations.

ECON 110.02 Principles of Macroeconomics 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Willis 203

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 64639

Yingtong Xie

This course gives students a foundation in the general principles of economics as a basis for effective citizenship and, when combined with 111, as a preparation for all advanced study in economics. Topics include analysis of the measurement, level, and distribution of national income; the concepts of inflation and depression; the role and structure of the banking system; fiscal and monetary stabilization techniques; implications of and limits to economic growth; and international economic relations.

ECON 111.01 Principles of Microeconomics 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Willis 204

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am

Other Tags:

Synonym: 64641

Faress F Bhuiyan

This course gives the students a foundation in the general principles of economics as a basis for effective citizenship and, when combined with 110, as a preparation for all advanced study in economics. Topics include consumer choice theory; the formation of prices under competition, monopoly, and other market structures; the determination of wages, profits, and income from capital; the distribution of income; and an analysis of policy directed towards problems of public finance, pollution, natural resources, and public goods.

ECON 111.02 Principles of Microeconomics 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 304

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am

Other Tags:

Synonym: 64642

Aaron M Swoboda

This course gives the students a foundation in the general principles of economics as a basis for effective citizenship and, when combined with 110, as a preparation for all advanced study in economics. Topics include consumer choice theory; the formation of prices under competition, monopoly, and other market structures; the determination of wages, profits, and income from capital; the distribution of income; and an analysis of policy directed towards problems of public finance, pollution, natural resources, and public goods.

ECON 111.03 Principles of Microeconomics 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Willis 204

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 64643

Jonathan M Lafky

This course gives the students a foundation in the general principles of economics as a basis for effective citizenship and, when combined with 110, as a preparation for all advanced study in economics. Topics include consumer choice theory; the formation of prices under competition, monopoly, and other market structures; the determination of wages, profits, and income from capital; the distribution of income; and an analysis of policy directed towards problems of public finance, pollution, natural resources, and public goods.

ECON 241.00 Growth and Development 6 credits

Ethan L Struby

Why are some countries rich and others poor? What causes countries to grow? This course develops a general framework of economic growth and development to analyze these questions. We will document the empirical differences in growth and development across countries and study some of the theories developed to explain these differences. This course complements Economics 240.

Prerequisite: Economics 110

ECON 262.00 The Economics of Sports 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Willis 211

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 64654

Mark T Kanazawa

In recent years, the sports business in the United States has grown into a multibillion-dollar industry. Understanding the sports business from an economic viewpoint is the subject of this course. Topics will include player compensation, revenue-sharing, salary caps, free agency, tournaments, salary discrimination, professional franchise valuation, league competitiveness, college athletics, and the economics of sports stadiums and arenas.

Prerequisite: Economics 110 and 111

ECON 265.00 Game Theory and Economic Applications 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Willis 204

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am

Other Tags:

Synonym: 64655

Jonathan M Lafky

Game theory is the study of purposeful behavior in strategic situations. It serves as a framework for analysis that can be applied to everyday decisions, such as working with a study group and cleaning your room, as well as to a variety of economic issues, including contract negotiations and firms' output decisions. In this class, modern game theoretic tools will be primarily applied to economic situations, but we will also draw on examples from other realms.

Prerequisite: Economics 111

ECON 280.00 International Trade 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Willis 204

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 64656

Prathi Seneviratne

A study of international trade theories and their policy implications. Classical and neo-classical trade models, the gains from trade, the terms of trade and the distribution of income, world trade patterns, international factor movements, tariffs, and the impact of commercial policy on developing and developed countries are analyzed.

Prerequisite: Economics 111

ECON 281.00 International Finance 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Willis 204

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 64657

Victor Almeida

This course studies theories of the multi-faceted interaction between the balance of international payments and foreign exchange market and the general levels of domestic prices, employment and economic activity. Topics include the balance of payments, foreign exchange markets, adjustment mechanisms in international payments, macroeconomic policies for internal and external balance, and international monetary systems.

Prerequisite: Economics 110

ECON 283.00 Corporate Organization and Finance 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Willis 211

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 64644

Yingtong Xie

This course investigates decision-making by firms and their managers. Specific topics include tradeoffs in corporate organization, executive compensation, project valuation, the cost of capital under debt and equity financing, and the firm’s optimal capital structure. 

Prerequisite: Economics 110 and 111

ECON 329.00 Econometrics 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Willis 211

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 64645

Mark T Kanazawa

This course is an introduction to the statistical methods used by economists to test hypotheses and to study and quantify economic relationships. The course emphasizes both econometric theory and practical application through analysis of economic data sets using statistical software. Prior experience with R is strongly encouraged. Topics include two-variable and multiple regression, interval estimation and hypothesis testing, discrete and continuous structural change, parameter restrictions, model construction, experimental design, issues of functional specification, model overfitting and underfitting, heteroscedasticity, autocorrelation, and multicollinearity.

Prerequisite: Economics 110 and 111, Mathematics 111 and either Statistics 120 (formerly Mathematics 215) or Statistics 250 (formerly Mathematics 275) or instructor consent

ECON 331.00 Intermediate Macro Theory 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Willis 203

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 64646

Ethan L Struby

Analysis of the forces determining the general level of output, employment, and prices with special emphasis on the role of money and on interest rate determination. This class is normally taken by juniors. Sophomores considering enrolling should speak to the instructor.

Prerequisite: Economics 110 and 111, Mathematics 111 and Statistics 120 (formerly Mathematics 215) or Statistics 250 (formerly Mathematics 275) or instructor consent

ENTS 120.51 Introduction to Geospatial Analysis & Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 20, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Hulings 316 / CMC 110

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
1:00pm5:00pm
Synonym: 64739

John L Berini

Spatial data analysis using Geographic Information Systems (GIS), remote sensing, global positioning, and related technologies are increasingly important for understanding and analyzing a wide range of biophysical, social, and economic phenomena. This course serves as an overview and introduction to the concepts, algorithms, issues, and methods in describing, analyzing, and modeling geospatial data over a range of application areas.

Sophomore Priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: ENTS 120.WL1 (Synonym 64741)

ENTS 210.00 Environmental Justice 6 credits

Colleen M Carpenter

The environmental justice movement seeks greater participation by marginalized communities in environmental policy, and equity in the distribution of environmental harms and benefits. This course will examine the meaning of "environmental justice," the history of the movement, the empirical foundation for the movement's claims, and specific policy questions. Our focus is the United States, but students will have the opportunity to research environmental justice in other countries.

ENTS 254.00 Topics in Landscape Ecology 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Willis 211

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 64749

Tsegaye H Nega

Landscape ecology is an interdisciplinary field that combines the spatial approach of the geographer with the functional approach of the ecologist to understand the ways in which landscape composition and structure affects ecological processes, species abundance, and distribution. Topics include collecting and referencing spatial data at broad scales, Geographic Information Systems (GIS), landscape metrics, simulating change in landscape pattern, landscape connectivity and meta-population dynamics, and reserve design.

Prerequisite: Biology 125 and 126

GEOL 340.54 Hydrogeology: Groundwater 6 credits

Open: Size: 18, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 123 / Anderson Hall 125

MTWTHF
11:10am12:00pm11:10am12:00pm1:00pm5:00pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 64804

Chloé Fandel

The principles of groundwater flow through the subsurface, and the functioning of aquifers. Topics include the properties of porous media, hydraulic head gradients, contaminant transport, and fractured and karstified aquifers. Labs will include working with physical sandbox models and soil columns, as well as an outdoor pumping well test (weather permitting). We will simulate groundwater flow using simple numerical modeling, beginning with an introduction to Python coding, and develop an increasingly complex groundwater model over the course of the term. No previous programming experience required.

Prerequisite: Geology 210 recommended

Extra Time.

HIST 213.00 Politics and Protest in the New Nation 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 236

MTWTHF
8:30am9:40am8:30am9:40am8:30am9:30am
Synonym: 65040

Serena R Zabin

In the first years of the United States, men and women of all races had to learn what it meant to live in the nation created by the U.S. Constitution. This class will focus on the American attempts to form a more perfect union, paying close attention to the place of slavery, Native dispossession, sexuality, and politics during the years 1787-1840. Throughout the course we will examine the ways in which the politics and protests of the early Republic continue to shape the current United States.

HIST 338.00 Digital History, Public Heritage & Deep Mapping 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 233

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 65048

Austin P Mason

How do new methods of digital humanities and collaborative public history change our understanding of space and place? This hands-on research seminar will seek answers through a deep mapping of the long history of Northfield, Minnesota, before and after its most well-known era of the late nineteenth-century. Deep mapping is as much archaeology as it is cartography, plumbing the depths of a particular place to explore its diversity through time. Students will be introduced to major theories of space and place as well as their application through technologies such as Geographic Information Systems (GIS), 3D modeling, and video game engines. We will mount a major research project working with the National Register of Historic Places, in collaboration with specialists in public history and community partners.

LING 117.00 Sociophonetics 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 330

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 64584

Morgan Rood

This course is a theoretical and practical introduction to studying phonetics (the science of speech) and its relation to sociolinguistic variation (how speech systematically varies across speakers). Throughout the course, students will collect their own conversational speech data and learn to conduct acoustic analysis. Skills developed in the course include recording speech, transcribing, data processing and normalization, and effective presentation of results.

MUSC 204.00 Theory II: Musical Structures 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 230

MTWTHF
8:30am9:40am8:30am9:30am8:30am9:40am
Synonym: 63889

Justin M London

An investigation into the nature of musical sounds and the way they are combined to form rhythms, melodies, harmonies, and form. Topics include the nature of musical pitch, the structure of musical scales and their influence on melody, what gives rise to a sense of tonality, the complexity of rhythmic patterns, and the architecture of musical form. Student work includes building a musical instrument, programming a drum machine, writing computer code to create harmonies and timbres, and an extended music analysis project using empirical methods.

Prerequisite: Music 101, or permission of the instructor as assessed by a diagnostic exam administered at the start of the term

NEUR 238.00 Neurons, Circuits and Behavior 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Hulings 316

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 64952

Eric D Hoopfer

Neurons are the building blocks of the nervous system. Molecular and cellular neuroscience seeks to understand the fundamental principles that govern how neurons function, how they communicate with each other, and how they assemble into circuits that generate behavior. This course focuses on the molecular and cellular basis of nervous system function from the level of genes and molecules to neural circuits and behavior. We will take an integrative approach to examine the genetic, molecular and cellular mechanisms that underlie neuronal communication, the molecular basis of sensation and innate behaviors, neural plasticity, and nervous system disorders. This course will emphasize the experimental evidence and techniques that have built our understanding of the molecular and cellular basis of behavior through team-based learning, analysis of primary literature papers and laboratory experimentation. A grade of C- or better must be earned in both Neuroscience 238 and 239 to satisfy the LS requirement.

Prerequisite: Neuroscience 127 or Biology 125.; Concurrent registration in Neuroscience 239.

PHIL 203.00 Bias, Belief, Community, Emotion 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 402

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 65445

Anna Moltchanova

What is important to individuals, how they see themselves and others, and the kind of projects they pursue are shaped by traditional and moral frameworks they didn’t choose. Individual selves are encumbered by their social environments and, in this sense, always ‘biased’, but some forms of bias are pernicious because they produce patterns of inter and intra-group domination and oppression. We will explore various forms of intersubjectivity and its asymmetries through readings in social ontology and social epistemology that theorize the construction of group and individual beliefs and identities in the context of the social world they engender.

Extra Time Required

PHIL 373.00 Reptiles and Demons 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 236

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 63951

Jason A Decker

Skeptical arguments—like Descartes' malignant demon argument—threaten to completely undermine our claim to have any knowledge of this world. Philosophers (and non-philosophers) have often met our apparent inability to answer these skeptical arguments with a shrug. The skeptical scenarios exert no gravitational pull on most minds and can be safely filed under "philosophical curiosities." Meanwhile, global conspiracy theories—like David Icke's theory that the world's governments are overrun with shapeshifting reptilians from the constellation Draco—also threaten to undermine our knowledge of the world.  Trying to answer them runs us into the very same cognitive and epistemic roadblocks that we run into with philosophical skepticism. We can't, however, meet these theories with a shrug. Conspiracy theories—even the wilder ones—do attract adherents and do have real-world (and sometimes devastating) consequences. Intensifying our predicament is the undeniable fact that we live in a world that is rife with conspiracies—some of them rather wild. In this seminar we will examine the cognitive architecture and evidential conditions that contribute to our predicament and then ask whether cognitive science or formal epistemology can offer any useful tools or strategies for confronting philosophical skepticism and conspiracy theories.

Prerequisite: A prior 200-level course in philosophy

PHYS 143.57 Physical Systems: Mechanics and Relativity and Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 24, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 036

MTWTHF
8:30am9:40am8:00am12:00pm8:30am9:40am8:15am9:30am8:30am9:30am
Synonym: 65167

Valerie Fox

This course begins with an introduction to classical mechanics using the Newtonian worldview. The kinematics and dynamics of some simple systems are investigated using Newton's laws, vector analysis, and the conservation laws of momentum and energy. The course moves beyond the Newtonian framework to address topics including special relativity and also selected applications to atomic, nuclear, and particle physics. Comfort with algebra and the integration and differentiation of elementary functions is assumed. Weekly laboratory work.

Prerequisite: Previous completion or concurrent registration in Mathematics 120 or 121. Not open to students who have completed Physics 131, 144, 145 or 151 at Carleton.

Combined content of PHYS 131 and PHYS 151

PHYS 145.52 Mechanics and Waves and Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 24, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 036 / Anderson Hall 025

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am1:00pm5:00pm9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 65168

Jay D Tasson

This course begins with an introduction to classical mechanics using the Newtonian worldview. The kinematics and dynamics of some simple systems are investigated using Newton's laws, vector analysis, and the conservation laws of momentum and energy. The course moves on to a study of the properties of fluids (both static and dynamic) and the principles of waves and wave motion (including both sound and light). Comfort with algebra and the integration and differentiation of elementary functions is assumed. Weekly laboratory work.

Prerequisite: Mathematics 101 or 111. Not open to students who have completed Physics 131, 143, or 144 at Carleton.

Combined content of PHYS 131/153

PHYS 145.59 Mechanics and Waves and Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 24, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 036 / Anderson Hall 025

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am8:00am12:00pm9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 65169

This course begins with an introduction to classical mechanics using the Newtonian worldview. The kinematics and dynamics of some simple systems are investigated using Newton's laws, vector analysis, and the conservation laws of momentum and energy. The course moves on to a study of the properties of fluids (both static and dynamic) and the principles of waves and wave motion (including both sound and light). Comfort with algebra and the integration and differentiation of elementary functions is assumed. Weekly laboratory work.

Prerequisite: Mathematics 101 or 111. Not open to students who have completed Physics 131, 143, or 144 at Carleton.

Combined content of PHYS 131/153

PHYS 233.00 Astrophysics II 6 credits

Open: Size: 18, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Olin 102

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 64135

Cindy A Blaha

A study of galactic and extragalactic astronomy with an emphasis on the physical principles underlying the observed phenomena. Topics include the structure and dynamics of the Milky Way Galaxy and other galaxies, the interstellar medium, quasars and active galaxies, clusters and superclusters, and cosmology.

Prerequisite: Physics 228 or 231

Cross-listed with ASTR 233

PHYS 235.52 Electricity and Magnetism and Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 12, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 036 / Anderson Hall 027

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm1:00pm5:00pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 65170

Evan A Rich

Electric and magnetic fields in free space, and their interactions with charges and currents. Topics include DC and AC circuits, Maxwell's equations, and electromagnetic waves. Weekly laboratory work.

Prerequisite: Physics 165, 226, 228 or Physics 231; Mathematics 210 or Mathematics 211; or instructor permission

PHYS 235.59 Electricity and Magnetism and Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 12, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 036 / Anderson Hall 027

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm8:00am12:00pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 65171

Evan A Rich

Electric and magnetic fields in free space, and their interactions with charges and currents. Topics include DC and AC circuits, Maxwell's equations, and electromagnetic waves. Weekly laboratory work.

Prerequisite: Physics 165, 226, 228 or Physics 231; Mathematics 210 or Mathematics 211; or instructor permission

PHYS 342.52 Contemporary Experimental Physics and Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 12, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 036 / Anderson Hall 035

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm1:00pm5:00pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 65172

Melissa Eblen-Zayas, Marty Baylor

A study of experimental techniques and apparatus basic to the measurements which underlie and validate contemporary theories in physics. Topics include electrical measurements, data analysis and statistics, optical and laser techniques, particle detectors, and time coincidence techniques. Applications are made to experiments such as magnetic resonance, Mossbauer and nuclear spectroscopy and laser optics. Class time is devoted to studying the measurement techniques and considering phenomenological models of the effects observed in the laboratory. One laboratory per week.

Prerequisite: (Physics 227 or 228) and 235 and (Physics 335 or Physic 346) or instructor permission

PHYS 342.54 Contemporary Experimental Physics and Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 12, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 036 / Anderson Hall 035

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:00pm5:00pm1:00pm2:00pm
Synonym: 65369

Marty Baylor

A study of experimental techniques and apparatus basic to the measurements which underlie and validate contemporary theories in physics. Topics include electrical measurements, data analysis and statistics, optical and laser techniques, particle detectors, and time coincidence techniques. Applications are made to experiments such as magnetic resonance, Mossbauer and nuclear spectroscopy and laser optics. Class time is devoted to studying the measurement techniques and considering phenomenological models of the effects observed in the laboratory. One laboratory per week.

Prerequisite: (Physics 227 or 228) and 235 and (Physics 335 or Physic 346) or instructor permission

PHYS 342.59 Contemporary Experimental Physics and Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 12, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 036 / Anderson Hall 035

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm8:00am12:00pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 65173

Melissa Eblen-Zayas

A study of experimental techniques and apparatus basic to the measurements which underlie and validate contemporary theories in physics. Topics include electrical measurements, data analysis and statistics, optical and laser techniques, particle detectors, and time coincidence techniques. Applications are made to experiments such as magnetic resonance, Mossbauer and nuclear spectroscopy and laser optics. Class time is devoted to studying the measurement techniques and considering phenomenological models of the effects observed in the laboratory. One laboratory per week.

Prerequisite: (Physics 227 or 228) and 235 and (Physics 335 or Physic 346) or instructor permission

POSC 122.00 Politics in America: Liberty and Equality 6 credits

An introduction to American government and politics. Focus on the Congress, Presidency, political parties and interest groups, the courts and the Constitution. Particular attention will be given to the public policy debates that divide liberals and conservatives and how these divisions are rooted in American political culture.

POSC 170.00 International Relations and World Politics 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

CMC 210

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 65122

Greg G Marfleet

What are the foundational theories and practices of international relations and world politics? This course addresses topics of a geopolitical, commercial and ideological character as they relate to global systems including: great power politics, polycentricity, and international organizations. It also explores the dynamic intersection of world politics with war, terrorism, nuclear weapons, national security, human security, human rights, and the globalization of economic and social development.

POSC 214.00 Visual Representations of Political Thought and Action 3 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

HASE 109

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 65476

Barbara Allen

Visual media offer an alternative method of framing political ideas and events. Images found in such texts as film, posters, and even in statistical tables can enlighten--or mislead. Readings in visual theory, political psychology, and graphic representation will enable you to read images and use these powerful media to convey your ideas and research.

POSC 230.00 Methods of Political Research 6 credits

Open: Size: 18, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Willis 114

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 65124

Greg G Marfleet

An introduction to research method, research design, and the analysis of political data. The course is intended to introduce students to the fundamentals of scientific inquiry as they are employed in the discipline. The course will consider the philosophy of scientific research generally, the philosophy of social science research, theory building and theory testing, the components of applied (quantitative and qualitative) research across the major sub-fields of political science, and basic methodological tools. Intended for majors only.

Prerequisite: Statistics 120, 230, 250, (formerly Mathematics 215, 245, 275), AP Statistics (score of 4 or 5) or Psychology 200/201 or Sociology/Anthropology 239

POSC 261.00 The Global Crisis of Democracy 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

HASE 105

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 63954

Alfred P Montero

Democracy is in trouble worldwide. The most visible indicators are the rise of explicitly anti-democratic leaders and anti-liberal parties that employ populism and exploit ethnic and ideological polarization to acquire power. Democratic norms and institutions have eroded across the globe. Structures that undergirded the positive-sum linkage between industrialization, the rise of labor unions, and democratic parties in much of the West have been transformed in ways that undermine democracy. This course will analyze these and related trends that demonstrate that liberal democracy is suffering a global crisis. Instruction will cover cases across time and from all regions of the world.

POSC 333.00 Global Social Changes and Sustainability* 6 credits

Tun Myint

This course is about the relationship between social changes and ecological changes to understand and to be able to advance analytical concepts, research methods, and theories of society-nature interactions. How do livelihoods of individuals and groups change over time and how do the changes affect ecological sustainability? What are the roles of human institutions in ecological sustainability? What are the roles of ecosystem dynamics in institutional sustainability? Students will learn fundamental theories and concepts that explain linkages between social change and environmental changes and gain methods and skills to measure social changes qualitatively and quantitatively.

Extra Time required.

PSYC 200.00 Measurement and Data Analysis in Psychology 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 329

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 65336

Mitchell R Campbell

The course considers the role of measurement and data analysis focused on behavioral sciences. Various forms of measurement and standards for the evaluation of measures are explored. Students learn how to summarize, organize, and evaluate data using a variety of techniques that are applicable to research in psychology and other disciplines. Among the analyses discussed and applied are tests of means, various forms of analysis of variance, correlation and regression, planned and post-hoc comparisons, as well as various non-parametric tests. Research design is also explored.

Prerequisite: Psychology 110, or Psychology/Cognitive Science 232/233, or instructor consent; Concurrent registration in Psychology 201 required

PSYC 201.01 Measurement and Data Analysis Lab 2 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Olin 104

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 65337

Mitchell R Campbell

This lab course accompanies the lecture course, Psychology 200, and must be taken during the same term. The lab will provide an opportunity to explore lecture topics more deeply, and in particular emphasize data collection and computational skills.

Prerequisite: Psychology 110, or Psychology/Cognitive Science 232/233, or instructor permission. Concurrent registration in Psychology 200 is required.

PSYC 200 required.

PSYC 201.02 Measurement and Data Analysis Lab 2 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Olin 104

MTWTHF
3:10pm4:55pm3:10pm4:55pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 65338

Mitchell R Campbell

This lab course accompanies the lecture course, Psychology 200, and must be taken during the same term. The lab will provide an opportunity to explore lecture topics more deeply, and in particular emphasize data collection and computational skills.

Prerequisite: Psychology 110, or Psychology/Cognitive Science 232/233, or instructor permission. Concurrent registration in Psychology 200 is required.

PSYC 200 required.

PSYC 233.01 Laboratory Research Methods in Cognitive Processes 2 credits

Open: Size: 12, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Olin 11

MTWTHF
2:00pm5:00pm
Synonym: 65662

Cross-listed with CGSC 233. Students will participate in the replication and planning of empirical studies, collecting and analyzing data relevant to major cognitive phenomena. A grade of C- or better must be earned in both to complete the LS requirement

Prerequisite: Psychology 232; Psychology 110, Cognitive Science 100, Cognitive Science 130 or instructor permission.

PSYC 232 required. Cross listed with CGSC 233.

Cross-listed with CGSC 233.01

PSYC 233.02 Laboratory Research Methods in Cognitive Processes 2 credits

Open: Size: 12, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Olin 11

MTWTHF
2:00pm5:00pm
Synonym: 65663

Cross-listed with CGSC 233. Students will participate in the replication and planning of empirical studies, collecting and analyzing data relevant to major cognitive phenomena. A grade of C- or better must be earned in both to complete the LS requirement

Prerequisite: Psychology 232; Psychology 110, Cognitive Science 100, Cognitive Science 130 or instructor permission.

PSYC 232 required. Cross listed with CGSC 233.

Cross-listed with CGSC 233.02

PSYC 235.01 Psychology of Language Laboratory 2 credits

Open: Size: 8, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Olin 11

MTWTHF
8:15am10:00am8:15am10:00am

Other Tags:

Synonym: 65340

Mija M Van Der Wege

This laboratory experience will expose students to a variety of methodologies employed by researchers interested in studying language. Throughout the term, students will both participate in experiments and conduct experiments. We will spend time discussing and performing typical analyses. Finally, students will be expected to become proficient in writing their experimental work in APA format and in presenting their research ideas in an oral format. Psychology 235 requires concurrent registration in Psychology 234. A grade of C- or better must be earned in both Psychology 234 and 235 to satisfy the LS requirement.

Prerequisite: Psychology 110; Concurrent registration in Psychology 234

Required concurrent registration in PSYC 234

PSYC 235.02 Psychology of Language Laboratory 2 credits

Open: Size: 8, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Olin 11

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am

Other Tags:

Synonym: 65341

Mija M Van Der Wege

This laboratory experience will expose students to a variety of methodologies employed by researchers interested in studying language. Throughout the term, students will both participate in experiments and conduct experiments. We will spend time discussing and performing typical analyses. Finally, students will be expected to become proficient in writing their experimental work in APA format and in presenting their research ideas in an oral format. Psychology 235 requires concurrent registration in Psychology 234. A grade of C- or better must be earned in both Psychology 234 and 235 to satisfy the LS requirement.

Prerequisite: Psychology 110; Concurrent registration in Psychology 234

Required concurrent registration in PSYC 234

PSYC 235.10 Psychology of Language Laboratory 2 credits

Open: Size: 8, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Olin 11

MTWTHF
8:15am10:00am8:15am10:00am

Other Tags:

Synonym: 65735

Mija M Van Der Wege

This laboratory experience will expose students to a variety of methodologies employed by researchers interested in studying language. Throughout the term, students will both participate in experiments and conduct experiments. We will spend time discussing and performing typical analyses. Finally, students will be expected to become proficient in writing their experimental work in APA format and in presenting their research ideas in an oral format. Psychology 235 requires concurrent registration in Psychology 234. A grade of C- or better must be earned in both Psychology 234 and 235 to satisfy the LS requirement.

Prerequisite: Psychology 110; Concurrent registration in Psychology 234

Required concurrent registration in PSYC 234

PSYC 235.12 Psychology of Language Laboratory 2 credits

Open: Size: 8, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Olin 11

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am

Other Tags:

Synonym: 65736

Mija M Van Der Wege

This laboratory experience will expose students to a variety of methodologies employed by researchers interested in studying language. Throughout the term, students will both participate in experiments and conduct experiments. We will spend time discussing and performing typical analyses. Finally, students will be expected to become proficient in writing their experimental work in APA format and in presenting their research ideas in an oral format. Psychology 235 requires concurrent registration in Psychology 234. A grade of C- or better must be earned in both Psychology 234 and 235 to satisfy the LS requirement.

Prerequisite: Psychology 110; Concurrent registration in Psychology 234

Required concurrent registration in PSYC 234

PSYC 257.01 Laboratory Research Methods in Social Behavior and Interpersonal Processes 2 credits

Open: Size: 12, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Olin 06

MTWTHF
2:00pm5:00pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 65314

Sharon A Akimoto

Students will participate in the planning and replication of empirical studies of the social psychology of social behavior. Requires concurrent registration in Psychology 256. A grade of C- or better must be earned in both Psychology 256 and 257 to satisfy the LS requirement.

Prerequisite: Psychology 110

PSYC 256 required.

PSYC 257.02 Laboratory Research Methods in Social Behavior and Interpersonal Processes 2 credits

Open: Size: 12, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Olin 06

MTWTHF
2:00pm5:00pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 65315

Sharon A Akimoto

Students will participate in the planning and replication of empirical studies of the social psychology of social behavior. Requires concurrent registration in Psychology 256. A grade of C- or better must be earned in both Psychology 256 and 257 to satisfy the LS requirement.

Prerequisite: Psychology 110

PSYC 256 required.

PSYC 370.00 Behavioral Neuroimmunology 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Hulings 316

MTWTHF
3:10pm4:55pm3:10pm4:55pm
Synonym: 65342

Gisel G Flores-Montoya

The immune system directly influences the central nervous system and behavior during both health and disease. The course will have an emphasis on animal behavior (e.g. memory and sociability assays) and techniques in neuroimmunology that range from genetic engineering (e.g. CRISPR and DREADD) to immune cell function, detection of surface receptors, and protein expression (e.g. flow cytometry, confocal microscopy, immune cell migration assays, ELISA, and western blot.) The topics that will be covered range from how cytokines influence behavior to effects of gut microbiota in brain function and behavior. This course will primarily use empirical research that will help you develop a deeper understanding of molecular techniques, cell biology, and develop strong analytical skills of biological findings in immunology and its connection with animal behavior. 

Prerequisite: Neuroscience 127 or Psychology 216 recommended or instructor permission

RELG 155.00 Hinduism: An Introduction 6 credits

Kristin C Bloomer

Hinduism is the world's third-largest religion (or, as some prefer, “way of life”), with about 1.2 billion followers. It is also one of its oldest, with roots dating back at least 3500 years. “Hinduism,” however, is a loosely defined, even contested term, designating the wide variety of beliefs and practices of the majority of the people of South Asia. This survey course introduces students to this great variety, including social structures (such as the caste system), rituals and scriptures, mythologies and epics, philosophies, life practices, politics, poetry, sex, gender, Bollywood, and—lest we forget—some 330 million gods and goddesses.

SOAN 240.00 Methods of Social Research 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 132

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am

Other Tags:

Synonym: 64873

Annette M Nierobisz

The course is concerned with social scientific inquiry and explanation, particularly with reference to sociology and anthropology. Topics covered include research design, data collection, and analysis of data. Both quantitative and qualitative methods are considered. Students will demonstrate their knowledge by developing a research proposal that is implementable.

Prerequisite: Sociology/Anthropology 110 or 111; Sociology/Anthropology 239, Mathematics 215 or Statistics 120

STAT 120.01 Introduction to Statistics 6 credits

Open: Size: 32, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

CMC 102

MTWTHF
8:30am9:40am8:30am9:40am8:30am9:30am
Synonym: 65278

Katie R St. Clair

(Formerly MATH 215) Introduction to statistics and data analysis. Practical aspects of statistics, including extensive use of statistical software, interpretation and communication of results, will be emphasized. Topics include: exploratory data analysis, correlation and linear regression, design of experiments, basic probability, the normal distribution, randomization approach to inference, sampling distributions, estimation, hypothesis testing, and two-way tables. Students who have taken Mathematics 211 are encouraged to consider the more advanced Mathematics 240/Statistics 250 (formerly Mathematics 265 and 275) Probability/Statistical Inference sequence.

Prerequisite: Not open to students who have already received credit for Psychology 200/201, Sociology/Anthropology 239 or Statistics 250 (formerly Mathematics 275).

Sophomore priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: STAT 120.WL1 (Synonym 65282)

STAT 120.02 Introduction to Statistics 6 credits

Open: Size: 32, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

CMC 102

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 65279

Deepak Bastola

(Formerly MATH 215) Introduction to statistics and data analysis. Practical aspects of statistics, including extensive use of statistical software, interpretation and communication of results, will be emphasized. Topics include: exploratory data analysis, correlation and linear regression, design of experiments, basic probability, the normal distribution, randomization approach to inference, sampling distributions, estimation, hypothesis testing, and two-way tables. Students who have taken Mathematics 211 are encouraged to consider the more advanced Mathematics 240/Statistics 250 (formerly Mathematics 265 and 275) Probability/Statistical Inference sequence.

Prerequisite: Not open to students who have already received credit for Psychology 200/201, Sociology/Anthropology 239 or Statistics 250 (formerly Mathematics 275).

Formerly Mathematics 215

STAT 120.03 Introduction to Statistics 6 credits

Open: Size: 32, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

CMC 102

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 65280

Adam Loy

(Formerly MATH 215) Introduction to statistics and data analysis. Practical aspects of statistics, including extensive use of statistical software, interpretation and communication of results, will be emphasized. Topics include: exploratory data analysis, correlation and linear regression, design of experiments, basic probability, the normal distribution, randomization approach to inference, sampling distributions, estimation, hypothesis testing, and two-way tables. Students who have taken Mathematics 211 are encouraged to consider the more advanced Mathematics 240/Statistics 250 (formerly Mathematics 265 and 275) Probability/Statistical Inference sequence.

Prerequisite: Not open to students who have already received credit for Psychology 200/201, Sociology/Anthropology 239 or Statistics 250 (formerly Mathematics 275).

Sophomore Priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: STAT 120.WL3 (Synonym 65283)

STAT 120.04 Introduction to Statistics 6 credits

Open: Size: 32, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

CMC 102

MTWTHF
3:10pm4:20pm3:10pm4:20pm3:30pm4:30pm
Synonym: 65281

Adam Loy

(Formerly MATH 215) Introduction to statistics and data analysis. Practical aspects of statistics, including extensive use of statistical software, interpretation and communication of results, will be emphasized. Topics include: exploratory data analysis, correlation and linear regression, design of experiments, basic probability, the normal distribution, randomization approach to inference, sampling distributions, estimation, hypothesis testing, and two-way tables. Students who have taken Mathematics 211 are encouraged to consider the more advanced Mathematics 240/Statistics 250 (formerly Mathematics 265 and 275) Probability/Statistical Inference sequence.

Prerequisite: Not open to students who have already received credit for Psychology 200/201, Sociology/Anthropology 239 or Statistics 250 (formerly Mathematics 275).

Formerly Mathematics 215

STAT 220.00 Introduction to Data Science 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

CMC 102

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 65284

Deepak Bastola

(Formerly Mathematics 285) This course will cover the computational side of data analysis, including data acquisition, management, and visualization tools. Topics may include: data scraping, data wrangling, data visualization using packages such as ggplots, interactive graphics using tools such as Shiny, supervised and unsupervised classification methods, and understanding and visualizing spatial data. We will use the statistics software R in this course.

Prerequisite: Statistics 120 (formerly Mathematics 215), Statistics 230 (formerly Mathematics 245) or Statistics 250 (formerly Mathematics 275)

Formerly Mathematics 285

STAT 230.00 Applied Regression Analysis 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

CMC 102

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 65285

Laura M Chihara

(Formerly Mathematics 245) A second course in statistics covering simple linear regression, multiple regression and ANOVA, and logistic regression. Exploratory graphical methods, model building and model checking techniques will be emphasized with extensive use of statistical software to analyze real-life data.

Prerequisite: Statistics 120 (formerly Mathematics 215), Statistics 250 (formerly Mathematics 275), Psychology 200, or AP Statistics Exam score of 4 or 5.

Sophomore priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: STAT 230.WL0 (Synonym 65286)

STAT 250.00 Introduction to Statistical Inference 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

CMC 210

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 65287

Andy N Poppick

(Formerly Mathematics 275) Introduction to modern mathematical statistics. The mathematics underlying fundamental statistical concepts will be covered as well as applications of these ideas to real-life data. Topics include: resampling methods (permutation tests, bootstrap intervals), classical methods (parametric hypothesis tests and confidence intervals), parameter estimation, goodness-of-fit tests, regression, and Bayesian methods. The statistical package R will be used to analyze data sets.

Prerequisite: Mathematics 240 Probability (formerly Mathematics 265)

Formerly Mathematics 275

STAT 285.00 Statistical Consulting 2 credits, S/CR/NC only

Closed: Size: 0, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

CMC 304

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 65288

Andy N Poppick

(Formerly MATH 280) Students will apply their statistical knowledge by analyzing data problems solicited from the Northfield community. Students will also learn basic consulting skills, including communication and ethics.

Prerequisite: Statistics 230 (formerly Mathematics 245) and instructor permission

Formerly Mathematics 280

STAT 310.00 Spatial Statistics 6 credits

Open: Size: 20, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

CMC 209

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 63898

Claire E Kelling

Spatial data is becoming increasingly available in a wide range of disciplines, including social sciences such as political science and criminology, as well as natural sciences such as geosciences and ecology. This course will introduce methods for exploring and analyzing spatial data. Methods will be covered to describe and analyze three main types of spatial data: areal, point process, and point-referenced (geostatistical) data. The course will also extensively cover tools for working with spatial data in R. The goals are that by the end of the course, students will be able to read, explore, plot, and describe spatial data in R, determine appropriate methods for analyzing a given spatial dataset, and work with their own spatial dataset(s) in R and derive conclusions about an application through statistical inference.

Prerequisite: Statistics 230 (formerly MATH 245) and Statistics 250 (formerly MATH 275)

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