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Your search for courses for 23/SP and with Curricular Exploration: HI found 42 courses.

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AFST 113.00 Introduction to Africana Studies 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Laird 205

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 64033

Kofi Owusu

This course focuses on the histories, ideas, experiences, and dreams that have shaped the lives of people of African descent. Then and now perspectives will define our exploration of incarceration and freedom; migration and emigration; separatism versus integration; race and class; art and politics. Discussion topics and seminal ideas will be drawn from texts including the following: the anthology Call and Response (on key debates in Black studies); the historical memoir Lose Your Mother (chronicling a journey along the Atlantic slave route); a work of fiction Middle Passage (that tells a story of enslavement, revolt, and redemption).

AMST 115.00 Introduction to American Studies 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 230

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 64042

Christopher M Elias

This overview of the "interdisciplinary discipline" of American Studies will focus on the ways American Studies engages with and departs from other scholarly fields of inquiry. We will study the stories of those who have been marginalized in the social, political, cultural, and economic life of the United States due to their class, race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, religion, citizenship, and level of ability. We will explore contemporary American Studies concerns like racial and class formation, the production of space and place, the consumption and circulation of culture, and transnational histories.

Sophomore Priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: AMST 115.WL0 (Synonym 64043)

AMST 396.00 Producing Latinidad 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Laird 206

MTWTHF
3:10pm4:55pm3:10pm4:55pm
Synonym: 64044

Adriana Estill

As Arlene Dávila points out in Latinos Inc, Latinidad—the term that names a set of presumably common attributes that connects Latinxs in the U.S.—emerges in part from communities but, importantly, is developed heavily by the media, advertising, and other political and social institutions, including academia. In this course we consider how ideas and imaginings of who Latinxs are and what Latinidad is develop within political spaces (the electorate, the census), in local places, and through various media, including television, advertising, and music. We will consider how individual writers and artists contribute to the conversation. Throughout, we will engage with social and cultural theories about racial formation, gender, and sexuality.

Prerequisite: American Studies 115 or instructor consent

ASST 284.07 Japanese Linguistics in Kyoto Seminar: History and Culture of Japan 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Synonym: 63926

Mike J Flynn

This course is an introduction to several aspects of Japanese society, taking advantage of the location of the Linguistics OCS seminar in Kyoto. It consists of readings and lectures about important events in historical and contemporary Japan, and will include visits to sites that illuminate those events in important ways. In addition to Kyoto and nearby places, there will be excursions to Tokyo and Hiroshima. 

Participation in Carleton OCS Linguistics in Japan Program

CHIN 258.00 Classical Chinese Thought: Wisdom and Advice from Ancient Masters 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Language & Dining Center 104

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 64521

Lei Yang

Behind the skyscrapers and the modern technology of present-day China stand the ancient Chinese philosophers, whose influence penetrates every aspect of society. This course introduces the teachings of various foundational thinkers: Confucius, Mencius, Laozi, Sunzi, Zhuangzi, and Hanfeizi, who flourished from the fifth-second centuries B.C. Topics include kinship, friendship, self-improvement, freedom, the art of war, and the relationship between human beings and nature. Aiming to bring Chinese wisdom to the context of daily life, this course opens up new possibilities to better understand the self and the world. No knowledge of Chinese is required.

In translation

CLAS 145.00 Ancient Greek Religion 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Language & Dining Center 104

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 64406

Jake N Morton

Greek religion played a crucial role in how the ancient Greeks understood the world around them. Mythology and cosmology shaped their understanding of how the world worked, while the ritual of sacrifice formed the basis of the social fabric underpinning all aspects of Greek society. In this course we will learn about Greece's polytheistic belief system--its gods and religious rites--as well as examining how religion shaped the daily lives of ordinary Greeks, often in surprising ways. We will read the works of ancient authors such as Homer and Hesiod, study the archaeological remains of sacred sites, inscriptions, and curse tablets, as well as engage with experimental archaeology.

ENTS 249.00 Troubled Waters 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Other Tags:

Synonym: 65957

Colleen M Carpenter

This course considers the contrast between the ways various religions conceive of water as sacred, and the fact that today’s intersecting environmental crises mean that drought, flooding, sea level rise, and lack of access to clean water and safe sanitation have made the human relationship with water more fraught and complex than ever before. We will look at specific situations of environmental injustice (including Flint, Michigan; Jackson, Mississippi; and the protests at Standing Rock) as well as reading more theoretical and theological takes on water, water justice, and water activism.

EUST 207.07 Rome Program: Italian Encounters 3 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Synonym: 63929

William L North, Victoria Morse

Through a range of interdisciplinary readings, guest lectures, and site visits, this course will provide students with opportunities to analyze important aspects of Italian culture and society, both past and present, as well as to examine the ways in which travelers, tourists, temporary visitors, and immigrants have experienced and coped with their Italian worlds. Topics may include transportation, cuisine, rituals and rhythms of Italian life, urbanism, religious diversity, immigration, tourism, historic preservation, and language. Class discussions and projects will offer students opportunities to reflect on their own encounters with contemporary Italian culture.

Prerequisite: Participation in OCS Rome Program

OCS Rome Program

FREN 208.07 Paris Program: Contemporary France: Cultures, Politics, Society 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Synonym: 63916

Éva S Pósfay

This course seeks to deepen students' knowledge of contemporary French culture through a pluridisciplinary approach, using multimedia (books, newspaper and magazine articles, videos, etc.) to generate discussion. It will also promote the practice of both oral and written French through exercises, debates, and oral presentations.

Prerequisite: French 204 or equivalent

Participation in Carleton OCS Paris Program

FREN 210.00 Coffee and News 2 credits, S/CR/NC only

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Language & Dining Center 335

MTWTHF
3:10pm4:20pm
Synonym: 64771

Cathy Yandell

Keep up your French while learning about current issues in France, as well as world issues from a French perspective. Class meets once a week for an hour. Requirements include reading specific sections of leading French newspapers, (Le Monde, Libération, etc.) on the internet, and then meeting once a week to exchange ideas over coffee with a small group of students.

Prerequisite: French 204 or instructor approval

Sophomore Priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: FREN 210.WL0 (Synonym 64772)

GWSS 312.00 Queer and Trans Theory 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 426

MTWTHF
3:10pm4:55pm3:10pm4:55pm
Synonym: 64827

Candace I Moore

This seminar offers students familiar with the foundational terms and concepts in gender and sexuality studies the opportunity to engage in more advanced explorations of relevant topics and debates in contemporary queer and trans theory. Seeing queer theory and trans theory as theoretical traditions that are historically and philosophically entangled but which at times necessarily diverge, the course focuses on “state of the field” essays from Gay and Lesbian Quarterly and Transgender Studies Quarterly as well as works that put gender and sexuality studies into conversation with disability studies, critical race theory, indigenous studies, and critiques of neoliberalism and imperialism.

Prerequisite: Gender, Women's & Sexuality Studies 110, 212 , 334 or Women's & Gender Studies 110, 112 or 200 or instructor consent

HIST 112.00 Freedom of Expression: A Global History 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 426

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 63948

Amna Khalid

Celebrated as the bedrock of democracy, freedom of expression is often seen as an American or western value. Yet the concept has a rich and global history. In this course we will track the long and turbulent history of freedom of expression from ancient Athens and medieval Islamic societies to the Enlightenment and the drive for censorship in totalitarian and colonial societies. Among the questions we will consider are: How have the parameters of free expression changed and developed over time? What is the relationship between free speech and political protest? How has free speech itself been weaponized? How does an understanding of the history of free speech help us think about the challenges of combating hatred and misinformation in today’s internet age?

Applies to multiple history fields, consult the instructor

HIST 150.00 Politics of Art in Early Imperial China 6 credits

Seungjoo Yoon

Poetry has been playing an important role in politics from early China down to the present. Members of the educated elite have used this form of artistic expression to create political allegories in times of war and diplomacy. Students will learn the multiple roles that poet-censors played in early imperial China, with thematic attention given to issues of self and ethnic/gendered identity, internal exile and nostalgia, and competing religious orientations that eventually fostered the rise of Neo-Confucianism. Students will write a short biography of a poet by sampling her/his poems and poetics (all in translation) from the common reading pool.

HIST 179.00 Modern Latin America Through Music 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 202

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 65717

Pedro F Quijada

Latin American popular music is traditionally studied through the lens of anthropology and ethnomusicology as a folkloric expression. This course, however, explores the social dynamics and historical meaning of the music. Through the analysis of popular musical pieces, related scholarship and course projects, we will learn about the historical background, the socio-political and cultural contexts and meaning of different musical expressions, relevant composers, performers and musical instruments of the region. We will also learn about the presence and legacy of Latin American music in the United States.

 

 

HIST 201.07 Rome Program: Building Power and Piety in Medieval Italy, CE 300-1150 6 credits

William L North

Through site visits, on-site projects, and readings, this course explores the ways in which individuals and communities attempted to give physical and visual form to their religious beliefs and political ambitions through their use of materials, iconography, topography, and architecture. We will also examine how the material legacies of imperial Rome, Byzantium, and early Christianity served as both resources for and constraints on the political, cultural, and religious evolution of the Italian peninsula and especially Rome and its environs from late antiquity through the twelfth century. Among the principal themes will be the development of the cult of saints, the development of the papal power and authority, Christianization, reform, pilgrimage, and monasticism.

Prerequisite: Acceptance to Carleton Rome Program

OCS Rome Program

HIST 206.07 Rome Program: The Eternal City in Time: Structure, Change, and Identity 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Synonym: 63928

Victoria Morse

This course will explore the lived experience of the city of Rome in the twelfth-sixteenth centuries. Students will study buildings, urban forms, surviving artifacts, and textual and other visual evidence to understand how politics, power, and religion (both Christianity and Judaism) mapped onto city spaces. How did urban challenges and opportunities shape daily life? How did the memory of the past influence the present? How did the rural world affect the city and vice versa? Students will work on projects closely tied to the urban fabric.

Prerequisite: Enrollment in OCS program

OCS Rome Program

HIST 213.00 Politics and Protest in the New Nation 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 236

MTWTHF
8:30am9:40am8:30am9:40am8:30am9:30am
Synonym: 65040

Serena R Zabin

In the first years of the United States, men and women of all races had to learn what it meant to live in the nation created by the U.S. Constitution. This class will focus on the American attempts to form a more perfect union, paying close attention to the place of slavery, Native dispossession, sexuality, and politics during the years 1787-1840. Throughout the course we will examine the ways in which the politics and protests of the early Republic continue to shape the current United States.

HIST 229.00 Working with Gender in U.S. History 6 credits

Annette R Igra

Historically work has been a central location for the constitution of gender identities for both men and women; at the same time, cultural notions of gender have shaped the labor market. We will investigate the roles of race, class, and ethnicity in shaping multiple sexual divisions of labor and the ways in which terms such as skill, bread-winning and work itself were gendered. Topics will include domestic labor, slavery, industrialization, labor market segmentation, protective legislation, and the labor movement.

HIST 230.00 Black Americans and the U.S. Civil War and Reconstruction 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 303

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 65042

Rebecca J Brueckmann

What does a most turbulent period in U.S. history look like from the perspectives of Black women and men? What role did Black thought and resistance play in shaping the outcome of the war? What was interracial democracy during Reconstruction and why was it ultimately overthrown? These are a few of the myriad questions we will seek to answer by studying the central role of Black Americans in the Civil War and Reconstruction eras. We will examine how Black people participated in and shaped the politics of this period and we will critically engage the meanings of freedom, emancipation, and democracy.

HIST 254.00 Colonialism in East Asia 6 credits

Seungjoo Yoon

This course explores the colonialisms in East Asia, both internal and external. Students examine Chinese, Inner Asian, Japanese, and European colonialisms from the seventeenth century to the present. Geographically, students cover borderlands of East Asian empires (Tibet, Xinjiang, Mongolia, Manchuria, Fujian, Yunnan, Canton, Vietnam, Taiwan, Korea, Okinawa, and Hokkaido). Methodologically, students eschew power-politics and historical studies of "frontier" regions in order to analyze everyday aspects of colonial arrangements and communities in different historical moments from the bottom up. Topics include ethnic identities, racial discourses, colonial settlements, opium regimes, violence and memory (e.g. Nanjing massacre), and forced labor migrations (e.g. comfort women).

HIST 263.00 Plagues of Empire 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 426

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 65044

Amna Khalid

The globalization of disease is often seen as a recent phenomenon aided by high-speed communication and travel. This course examines the history of the spread of infectious diseases by exploring the connection between disease, medicine and European imperial expansion. We consider the ways in which European expansion from 1500 onwards changed the disease landscape of the world and how pre-existing diseases in the tropics shaped and thwarted imperial ambitions. We will also question how far Western medicine can be seen as a benefit by examining its role in facilitating colonial expansion and constructing racial and gender difference.

HIST 275.00 Latin American Immigration to the US 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 426

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 65711

Pedro F Quijada

Immigration from Latin America has historically been, and continues to be, a topic of concern and controversy in the United States. This course seeks to provide a clear and informed understanding of the phenomenon. It surveys various migration waves from Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean, and South America. Through a variety of audio-visual sources, scholarship, testimonies/memoirs, and other materials, students will examine the political and economic factors that pushed people out of their countries and pulled them into the United States; the migrants' perilous journey to the north; and the everyday life of these migrants once they are in the U.S.

HIST 287.00 From Alchemy to the Atom Bomb: The Scientific Revolution and the Making of the Modern World 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 330

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 65046

Antony E Adler

This course examines the growth of modern science since the Renaissance with an emphasis on the Scientific Revolution, the development of scientific methodology, and the emergence of new scientific disciplines. How might a history of science focused on scientific networks operating within society, rather than on individual scientists, change our understanding of “genius,” “progress,” and “scientific impartiality?” We will consider a range of scientific developments, treating science both as a body of knowledge and as a set of practices, and will gauge the extent to which our knowledge of the natural world is tied to who, when, and where such knowledge has been produced and circulated.

HIST 338.00 Digital History, Public Heritage & Deep Mapping 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 233

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 65048

Austin P Mason

How do new methods of digital humanities and collaborative public history change our understanding of space and place? This hands-on research seminar will seek answers through a deep mapping of the long history of Northfield, Minnesota, before and after its most well-known era of the late nineteenth-century. Deep mapping is as much archaeology as it is cartography, plumbing the depths of a particular place to explore its diversity through time. Students will be introduced to major theories of space and place as well as their application through technologies such as Geographic Information Systems (GIS), 3D modeling, and video game engines. We will mount a major research project working with the National Register of Historic Places, in collaboration with specialists in public history and community partners.

HIST 346.00 The Holocaust 6 credits

David G Tompkins

This course will grapple with the difficult and complicated phenomenon of the genocide of the Jews of Europe. We will explore anti-Semitism in its historical context, both in the German-speaking lands as well as in Europe as a whole. The experience of Jews in Nazi Germany will be an area of focus, but this class will look at European Jews more broadly, both before and during the Second World War. The question of responsibility and guilt will be applied to Germans as well as to other European societies, and an exploration of victims will extend to other affected groups.

IDSC 251.01 Windows on the Good Life 2 credits, S/CR/NC only

Open: Size: 18, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 136

MTWTHF
8:00pm9:45pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 65424

Laurence D Cooper, Alan Rubenstein

Human beings are always and everywhere challenged by the question: What should I do to spend my mortal time well? One way to approach this ultimate challenge is to explore some of the great cultural products of our civilization--works that are a delight to read for their wisdom and artfulness. This series of two-credit courses will explore a philosophical dialogue of Plato in the fall, a work from the Bible in the winter, and a pair of plays by Shakespeare in the spring. The course can be repeated for credit throughout the year and in subsequent years.

IDSC 251.02 Windows on the Good Life 2 credits, S/CR/NC only

Open: Size: 18, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 136

MTWTHF
3:10pm4:45pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 65425

Laurence D Cooper, Alan Rubenstein

Human beings are always and everywhere challenged by the question: What should I do to spend my mortal time well? One way to approach this ultimate challenge is to explore some of the great cultural products of our civilization--works that are a delight to read for their wisdom and artfulness. This series of two-credit courses will explore a philosophical dialogue of Plato in the fall, a work from the Bible in the winter, and a pair of plays by Shakespeare in the spring. The course can be repeated for credit throughout the year and in subsequent years.

LTAM 398.00 Latin American Forum 2 credits, S/CR/NC only

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Other Tags:

Synonym: 65870

Héctor Melo Ruiz

This colloquium will explore specific issues or works in Latin American Studies through discussion of a common reading, public presentation, project, and/or performance that constitute the annual Latin American Forum. Students will be required to attend two meetings during the term to discuss the common reading or other material and must attend, without exception. All events of the Forum which take place during fourth week of spring term (on Friday afternoon and Saturday morning). A short integrative essay or report will be required at the end of the term. Intended as capstone for the Latin American Studies minor.

PHIL 203.00 Bias, Belief, Community, Emotion 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 402

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 65445

Anna Moltchanova

What is important to individuals, how they see themselves and others, and the kind of projects they pursue are shaped by traditional and moral frameworks they didn’t choose. Individual selves are encumbered by their social environments and, in this sense, always ‘biased’, but some forms of bias are pernicious because they produce patterns of inter and intra-group domination and oppression. We will explore various forms of intersubjectivity and its asymmetries through readings in social ontology and social epistemology that theorize the construction of group and individual beliefs and identities in the context of the social world they engender.

Extra Time Required

PHIL 213.00 Ethics 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 303

MTWTHF
8:15am10:00am8:15am10:00am
Synonym: 65014

Daniel M Groll

How should we live? This is the fundamental question for the study of ethics. This course looks at classic and contemporary answers to the fundamental question from Socrates to Kant to modern day thinkers. Along the way, we consider slightly (but only slightly) more tractable questions such as: What reason is there to be moral? Is there such a thing as moral knowledge (and if so, how do we get it)? What are the fundamental principles of right and wrong (if there are any at all)? Is morality objective?

PHIL 255.00 Comparative Philosophy 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 305

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 63958

Hope C Sample

Philosophical problems are motivated by human concerns that are often shared across cultures. In this course, we will analyze how philosophers from different traditions have approached problems concerning the structure of reality, the nature of knowledge and experience, and how we ought to live. We will identify how their cultural context impacts their resolution of metaphysical, epistemic, and ethical problems. Moreover, beyond comparing and contrasting, we will consider how philosophers from different philosophical traditions could have learned from or inspired one another if they had engaged with one another. By engaging in this cross-cultural and critical investigation, we will gain a broader view of how philosophy has been used to make sense of the world and its limitations and prospects.

PHIL 373.00 Reptiles and Demons 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 236

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 63951

Jason A Decker

Skeptical arguments—like Descartes' malignant demon argument—threaten to completely undermine our claim to have any knowledge of this world. Philosophers (and non-philosophers) have often met our apparent inability to answer these skeptical arguments with a shrug. The skeptical scenarios exert no gravitational pull on most minds and can be safely filed under "philosophical curiosities." Meanwhile, global conspiracy theories—like David Icke's theory that the world's governments are overrun with shapeshifting reptilians from the constellation Draco—also threaten to undermine our knowledge of the world.  Trying to answer them runs us into the very same cognitive and epistemic roadblocks that we run into with philosophical skepticism. We can't, however, meet these theories with a shrug. Conspiracy theories—even the wilder ones—do attract adherents and do have real-world (and sometimes devastating) consequences. Intensifying our predicament is the undeniable fact that we live in a world that is rife with conspiracies—some of them rather wild. In this seminar we will examine the cognitive architecture and evidential conditions that contribute to our predicament and then ask whether cognitive science or formal epistemology can offer any useful tools or strategies for confronting philosophical skepticism and conspiracy theories.

Prerequisite: A prior 200-level course in philosophy

POSC 160.00 Political Philosophy 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

CMC 209

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am

Other Tags:

Synonym: 65121

Laurence D Cooper

Introduction to ancient and modern political philosophy. We will investigate several fundamentally different approaches to the basic questions of politics--questions concerning the character of political life, the possibilities and limits of politics, justice, and the good society--and the philosophic presuppositions (concerning human nature and human flourishing) that underlie these, and all, political questions.

POSC 258.00 Politics and Ambition 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 230

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 65137

Laurence D Cooper

Is personal ambition a threat to peace and the public good or is it a prod to nobility and heroism? Does it exemplify the opposition between self and society or does it represent their intersection and mutual support—or both? And what is the nature of political ambition, especially the ambition to rule: what does the would-be ruler really want? We will take up these and related questions by studying several classic works of philosophy and literature. Readings will likely include works by Plato, Xenophon, and Shakespeare as well as American founders, statesmen, and moral leaders. 

Crosslisted with POSC 357

RELG 110.00 Understanding Religion 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 305

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 65347

Michael D McNally

How can we best understand the role of religion in the world today, and how should we interpret the meaning of religious traditions--their texts and practices--in history and culture? This class takes an exciting tour through selected themes and puzzles related to the fascinating and diverse expressions of religion throughout the world. From politics and pop culture, to religious philosophies and spiritual practices, to rituals, scriptures, gender, religious authority, and more, students will explore how these issues emerge in a variety of religions, places, and historical moments in the U.S. and across the globe.

RELG 121.00 Introduction to Christianity 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 304

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 65358

Lori K Pearson

This course will trace the history of Christianity from its origins in the villages of Palestine, to its emergence as the official religion of the Roman Empire, and through its evolution and expansion as the world's largest religion. The course will focus on events, persons, and ideas that have had the greatest impact on the history of Christianity, and examine how this tradition has evolved in different ways in response to different needs, cultures, and tensions--political and otherwise--around the world. This is an introductory course. No familiarity with the Bible, Christianity, or the academic study of religion is presupposed.

RELG 155.00 Hinduism: An Introduction 6 credits

Kristin C Bloomer

Hinduism is the world's third-largest religion (or, as some prefer, “way of life”), with about 1.2 billion followers. It is also one of its oldest, with roots dating back at least 3500 years. “Hinduism,” however, is a loosely defined, even contested term, designating the wide variety of beliefs and practices of the majority of the people of South Asia. This survey course introduces students to this great variety, including social structures (such as the caste system), rituals and scriptures, mythologies and epics, philosophies, life practices, politics, poetry, sex, gender, Bollywood, and—lest we forget—some 330 million gods and goddesses.

RELG 233.00 Gender and Power in the Catholic Church 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 236

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 65355

Sonja G Anderson

How does power flow and concentrate within the Catholic Church? What are the gendered aspects of the structure, history, and theology of Catholicism? Through a combination of readings, discussions, and conversations with living figures, students will develop the ability to critically and empathetically interpret issues of gender, sexuality, and power in the Catholic Church, especially as these issues appear in official Vatican texts. Topics include: God, suffering, sacraments, salvation, damnation, celibacy, homosexuality, the family, saints, the ordination of women as priests, feminist theologies, canon law, the censuring of “heretical” theologians, Catholic hospital policy, and the clerical sex abuse crisis.

Extra Time Required

RELG 234.00 Angels, Demons, and Evil 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 301

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 65563

Sonja G Anderson

Why do bad things happen to good people? Why do bad things happen, period? Could angels and demons have something to do with it? This course asks how cosmology—an account of how the universe is put together and the different entities that inhabit it—can be an answer to the problem of evil and injustice. We will start with a historical investigation of the demonology and angelology of ancient pagan, Jewish, and Christian texts and then move into modern practices such as exorcism and magical realist literature. Along the way, we will keep asking how these systems justify the existence of evil and provide programs for dealing with it.

RELG 243.00 Native American Religious Freedom 6 credits

Michael D McNally

This course explores historical and legal contexts in which Native Americans have practiced their religions in the United States. Making reference to the cultural background of Native traditions, and the history of First Amendment law, the course explores landmark court cases in Sacred Lands, Peyotism, free exercise in prisons, and sacralized traditional practices (whaling, fishing, hunting) and critically examines the conceptual framework of "religion" as it has been applied to the practice of Native American traditions. Service projects will integrate academic learning and student involvement in matters of particular concern to contemporary native communities.

RELG 254.00 Zen Buddhism 6 credits

Jonathan H Dickstein

An exploration of the "meditation" school of East Asian Buddhism. We will trace Zen back to its purported origins in India, through its development in China, while focusing on its history in Japan. In addition to its philosophy and practice, we will study its influence on various aspects of Japanese culture--ink painting, calligraphy, Noh theater, tea ceremony, samurai ethics, and martial arts. We will also consider Zen's participation in Japan's nationalism and wartime aggression as well as its place in America, where it has influenced art, literature, and religion for over a century.

RELG 329.00 Modernity and Tradition 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 303

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 65364

Lori K Pearson

How do we define traditions if they change over time and are marked by internal conflict? Is there anything stable about a religious tradition—an essence, or a set of practices or beliefs that abide amidst diversity and mark it off from a surrounding culture or religion? How do people live out or re-invent their traditions in the modern world? In this seminar we explore questions about pluralism, identity, authority, and truth, and we examine the creative ways beliefs and practices change in relation to culture. We consider how traditions grapple with difference, especially regarding theology, ethics, law, and gender.

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