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Your search for courses for 23/SP and with Curricular Exploration: LA found 45 courses.

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AMST 222.00 Indigenous Film 6 credits

This course introduces students to the world of Indigenous films, beginning with representations of Indians and how these images shape what most people “know” about “Indians.” Simultaneously, Indigenous filmmakers exercise visual sovereignty by not only refusing representations of Indigenous people, but by creating visual representations of Indigenous peoples that speak to the urgent issues of the present. Through Indigenous films, we will examine genres, develop an appreciation for historical and cultural contexts of films, and consider how these films are forms of Indigenous resurgence. We will also learn the basics of media literacy and film analysis. Our key concepts include visual sovereignty, Indigenous, Indians, settler colonialism, decolonization, resurgence, tradition, and gender.

ARBC 222.00 Music in the Middle East 6 credits

Open: Size: 20, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 230

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 64051

Yaron Klein

The Middle East is home to a great number of musical styles, genres, and traditions. Regional, ideological, and cultural diversity, national identity, and cross-cultural encounters--all express themselves in music. We will explore some of the many musical traditions in the Arab world, from early twentieth century to the present. Class discussions based on readings in English and guided listening. No prior music knowledge required, but interested students with or without musical background can participate in an optional, hands-on Arab music performance workshop, on Western or a few (provided) Middle Eastern instruments throughout the term.

ARBC 315.00 Readings in Premodern Arabic Anthologies 3 credits

Open: Size: 20, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 136

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 64054

Yaron Klein

The concept of adab as the liberal arts education of the premodern Arab world presents itself most vividly in the adab anthology. Authors writing in this genre collected and classified the knowledge of their time, drawing on material from a large variety of disciplines: literature (poetic, proverbial, historical-anecdotal), Religion (Quran, prophetic tradition, jurisprudence, theology), linguistics, as well as philosophy and the sciences. This encyclopedic genre represented the ideal of a broad-based erudition, and the perception that education should be entertaining as it is edifying. In this class we will read excerpts from the works of some of the major premodern anthology writers: Ibn Abd Rabbihi, Abu l-Faraj al-Isfahani, al-Ibshihi and al-Nuwayri.

Prerequisite: Arabic 206 or equivalent

ARTH 140.02 African Art and Culture 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Boliou 161

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 64072

Ross K Elfline

This course will survey the art and architecture of African peoples from prehistory to the present. Focusing on significant case studies in various mediums (including sculpture, painting, architecture, masquerades and body arts), this course will consider the social, cultural, aesthetic and political contexts in which artistic practices developed both on the African continent and beyond. Major themes will include the use of art for status production, the use of aesthetic objects in social rituals and how the history of African and African diaspora art has been written and institutionally framed.

ARTH 241.00 Contemporary Art for Artists 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Boliou 161

MTWTHF
12:30pm3:00pm12:30pm3:00pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 64073

Ross K Elfline

This course is a survey of major artistic movements after 1945 as well as an introduction to significant tendencies in current art and craft production. The goal of this course is to develop a familiarity with the important debates, discussions, and critical issues facing artists today. By the end of the course, students will be able to relate their own work as cultural producers to these significant contemporary artistic developments. Students will read, write about, and discuss primary sources, artist statements, and theoretical essays covering a wide range of media with the ultimate goal of articulating their own artistic project.

Prerequisite: Any two studio art courses or permission from the instructor. Not open to students who have previously taken Art History 240

Extra Time Required

ARTH 260.00 Planning Utopia: Ideal Cities in Theory and Practice 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Boliou 161

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 64074

Baird E Jarman

This course will survey the history of ideal plans for the built urban environment. Particular attention will be given to examples from about 1850 to the present. Projects chosen by students will greatly influence the course content, but subjects likely to receive sustained attention include: Renaissance ideal cities, conceptions of public and private space, civic rituals, the industrial city, Baron Haussmann’s renovations of Paris, suburbanization, the Garden City movement, zoning legislation, Le Corbusier’s Ville Contemporaine, Frank Lloyd Wright’s Broadacre City, New Urbanism and urban renewal, and planned capitals such as Brasília, Canberra, Chandigarh, and Washington, D.C.

Prerequisite: Any one Art History course or instructor permission

ARTH 298.00 Seminar for Art History Majors 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Boliou 140

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 64076

Jessica F Keating

An intensive study of the nature of art history as an intellectual discipline and of the approaches scholars have taken to various art historical problems. Attention as well to principles of current art historical research and writing. Recommended for juniors who have declared art history as a major.

CAMS 110.00 Introduction to Cinema and Media Studies 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 132

MTWTHF
3:10pm4:55pm3:10pm4:55pm
Synonym: 64245

Carol Donelan

This course introduces students to the basic terms, concepts and methods used in cinema studies and helps build critical skills for analyzing films, technologies, industries, styles and genres, narrative strategies and ideologies. Students will develop skills in critical viewing and careful writing via assignments such as a short response essay, a plot segmentation, a shot breakdown, and various narrative and stylistic analysis papers. Classroom discussion focuses on applying critical concepts to a wide range of films. Requirements include two evening film screenings per week. Extra time.

Sophomore Priority. Extra Time required. Evening Screenings.

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: CAMS 110.WL0 (Synonym 64246)

CAMS 218.00 Contemporary Global Cinemas 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 133

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 63941

Jay S Beck

This course is designed as a critical study of global filmmakers and the issues surrounding cinema and its circulation in the twenty-first century. The class will emphasize the close reading of films to study different cultural discourses, cinematic styles, genres, and reception. It will look at national, transnational, and diasporic-exilic cinema to consider how films express both cultural forms and contexts. Aesthetic, social, political, and industrial issues also will be examined each week to provide different approaches for cinematic analysis.

Extra Time Required, Evening Screenings required

CAMS 330.00 Cinema Studies Seminar 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 132

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 64244

Carol Donelan

The purpose of this seminar is guide students in developing and consolidating their conceptual understanding of theories central to the field of cinema studies. Emphasis is on close reading and discussion of classical and contemporary theories ranging from Eisenstein, Kracauer, Balazs, Bazin and Barthes to theories of authorship, genre and ideology and trends in contemporary theory influenced by psychoanalysis, phenomenology and cognitive studies.

Prerequisite: Cinema and Media Studies 110 or instructor permission

CHIN 350.00 Reading Chinese Comics 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Language & Dining Center 205

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 64523

Lin Deng

This course selects a range of popular comics as reading materials, including stories based on traditional novels and fantasies, science fiction, children’s literature, and non-fiction. Students will gain important cultural and historical knowledge about China, expand vocabulary on a variety of cultural and societal topics, and most importantly, develop proficiency in producing descriptions and third-person narratives both orally and in writing.

Prerequisite: Chinese 206

CLAS 175.00 Writing the City of Rome: Image, Text, and Site 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Language & Dining Center 104

MTWTHF
3:10pm4:55pm3:10pm4:55pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 63971

Victoria Austen

Ancient Rome has occupied a unique place in the Western consciousness for over 2000 years. It is a city that has inspired many texts, and both its physical fabric and symbolic nature have been reworked and rethought by archaeologists, historians, and literary critics alike. For the ancients, ‘Rome’ took on meaning not just from its concrete monuments, but also from the literary motifs and symbols it evoked. In this class, we will consider how Rome is used as both a setting and inspiration for Latin poetry, and consider how poets both represented and created an image of ‘Rome’.

ENGL 115.00 The Art of Storytelling 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Laird 205

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 64728

Kofi Owusu

Jorge Luis Borges is quoted as saying that "unlike the novel, a short story may be, for all purposes, essential." This course focuses attention primarily on the short story as an enduring form. We will read short stories drawn from different literary traditions and from various parts of the world. Stories to be read include those by Aksenov, Atwood, Beckett, Borges, Camus, Cheever, Cisneros, Farah, Fuentes, Gordimer, Ishiguro, Kundera, Mahfouz, Marquez, Moravia, Nabokov, Narayan, Pritchett, Rushdie, Trevor, Welty, and Xue. 

ENGL 118.00 Introduction to Poetry 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Laird 206

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 64733

Constance Walker

“Poetry is the way we help give name to the nameless so it can be thought”—Audre Lorde.  In this course we will explore how poets use form, tone, sound, imagery, rhythm, and subject matter to create works of astonishing imagination, beauty, and power. In discussions, Moodle posts, and essay assignments we’ll analyze individual works by poets from Sappho to Amanda Gorman (and beyond); there will also be daily recitations of poems, since the musicality is so intrinsic to the meaning.

ENGL 245.00 Bollywood Nation 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Laird 206

MTWTHF
1:50am3:00am1:50am3:00am2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 64729

Arnab Chakladar

This course will serve as an introduction to Bollywood or popular Hindi cinema from India. We will trace the history of this cinema and analyze its formal components. We will watch and discuss some of the most celebrated and popular films of the last 60 years with particular emphasis on urban thrillers and social dramas.

ENGL 258.00 Playwrights of Color: Taking the Stage 6 credits

Nancy J Cho

This course examines work by U.S. playwrights of color from the 1950s to the present, focusing on questions of race, performance, and self-representation. We will consider opportunities and limitations of the commercial theater, Off-Off Broadway, ethnic theaters, and non-traditional performance spaces. Playwrights may include Alice Childress, Lorraine Hansberry, Amiri Baraka, Ntozake Shange, Luis Valdez, Cherrie Moraga, August Wilson, David Henry Hwang, Philip Gotanda, Maria Irene Fornes, Anna Deavere Smith, and Chay Yew. We will watch selected film adaptations and attend a live performance when possible. 

ENGL 295.00 Critical Methods 6 credits

Open: Size: 20, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Laird 205

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 64730

Susan Jaret McKinstry

Required of students majoring in English, this course explores practical and theoretical issues in literary analysis and contemporary criticism. Not open to first year students.

Prerequisite: One English Foundations course and one prior 6 credit English course

Not open to first year students.

ENGL 329.00 The City in American Literature 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Laird 007

MTWTHF
3:10pm4:55pm3:10pm4:55pm
Synonym: 64737

Nancy J Cho

How do American authors "write the city"? The city as both material reality and metaphor has fueled the imagination of diverse novelists, poets, and playwrights, through tales of fallen women and con men, immigrant dreams, and visions of apocalypse. After studying the realistic tradition of urban fiction at the turn of the twentieth century, we will turn to modern and contemporary re-imaginings of the city, with a focus on Chicago, New York and Los Angeles. Selected films, photographs, and historical sources will supplement our investigations of how writers face the challenge of representing urban worlds.

Prerequisite: One English foundations course and one other 6 credit English course, or instructor permission

ENGL 338.00 Dickinson, Moore, Bishop 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Laird 218

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 65713

Peter J Balaam

An intensive study of lyric invention and innovation in the work of Emily Dickinson, Marianne Moore, and Elizabeth Bishop. Starting with formalist readings and historicizing the poetic subjects they pursued in common (self and society, loss and knowledge, nature, gender, the senses, the body), we will explore their practice, reception, and influence in relation to changing Modernist poetics, 1860 to 1970, and to specifics of place: Amherst, Brooklyn, Nova Scotia, Key West, and Brazil.

Prerequisite: One English foundations course and one additional 6 credit English course or instructor permission

ENGL 395.00 Seductive Fictions 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Laird 206

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 64738

Jessica L Leiman

Stories of virtue in distress and innocence ruined preoccupied English novelists of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries.  This course will focus on the English seduction novel, considering the following questions: What was the allure of the seduction plot?  What does it reveal about sexual relations, gender, power, and class during this period?  How does the seduction plot address and provoke concerns about novel-reading itself during a time when the genre was considered both an instrument of education and an agent of moral corruption?  Authors include: Eliza Haywood, Samuel Richardson, Susanna Rowson, and Bram Stoker.

Prerequisite: English 295 and one 300 level English course

FREN 245.00 Francophone Literature of Africa and the Caribbean 6 credits

Open: Size: 20, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Language & Dining Center 243

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 64775

Chérif Keïta

Reading and discussion of literary works, with analysis of social, historical and political issues, with an emphasis on cultural and literary movements such as Négritude (El Negrismo, in Cuba) and their role in shaping ideas of self-determination, Nationalism and Independence in the French colonies of the Caribbean and Black Africa. We will read works by Aimé Césaire (Martinique), Léopold Sédar Senghor (Senegal), Léon Gontran Damas (French Guiana), Jacques Roumain (Haîti), Laye Camara (Guinea), Mongo Béti (Cameroun), Simone Schwartz-Bart (Guadeloupe) and Alain Mabanckou (Congo). Conducted in French.

Prerequisite: French 204 or the equivalent

FREN 254.07 Paris Program: French Art in Context 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Synonym: 63917

Éva S Pósfay

Home of some of the finest and best known museums in the world, Paris has long been recognized as a center for artistic activity. Students will have the opportunity to study art from various periods on site, including Impressionism, Expressionism, and Surrealism. In-class lectures and discussions will be complemented by guided visits to the unparalleled collections of the Louvre, the Musée d'Orsay, the Centre Pompidou, local art galleries, and other appropriate destinations. Special attention will be paid to the program theme.

Prerequisite: French 204 or the equivalent and Participation in OCS Paris Program

Participation in Carleton OCS Paris Program

FREN 255.07 Paris Program: Islam in France: Historical Approaches and Current Debates 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 63918

Éva S Pósfay

In this course, students will explore the historical, cultural, social, and religious traces of Islam as they have been woven over time into the modern fabric of French society. Through images drawn from film, photography, television, and museum displays, they will discover the important role this cultural contact zone has played in the French experience. The course will take advantage of the resources of the city of Paris and will include excursions to museums as well as cultural and religious centers.

Prerequisite: French 204 or the equivalent and participation in Paris OCS program

Participation in Carleton OCS Paris Program

FREN 259.07 Paris Program: Hybrid Paris 6 credits

Éva S Pósfay

Through literature, cultural texts, and experiential learning in the city, this course will explore the development of both the "Frenchness" and the hybridity that constitute contemporary Paris. Immigrant cultures, notably North African, will also be highlighted. Plays, music, and visits to cultural sites will complement the readings.

Prerequisite: French 204 or the equivalent and participation in OCS Paris program

Participation in Carleton OCS Paris Program

FREN 340.00 Arts of Brevity: Short Fiction 3 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 233

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 64776

Scott D Carpenter

The rise of newspapers and magazines in the nineteenth century promotes a variety of short genres that will remain popular to the present day: short stories, prose poetry, vignettes, theatrical scenes. In this short course (first five weeks of the term) we'll study short works by such authors as Diderot, Sand, Balzac, Mérimée, Flaubert, Allais, Tardieu, Le Clézio. Conducted in French.

Prerequisite: One French course beyond French 204 or instructor permission

1st 5 weeks

FREN 341.00 Madame Bovary and Her Avatars 3 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 233

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 64777

Scott D Carpenter

Decried as scandalous, heralded as the first "modern" novel, Gustave Flaubert's Madame Bovary (published in 1857) sparked debate, spawned both detractors and followers, and became a permanent fixture in French culture and even the French language. In this five-week course we will read the novel, study its cultural context and impact, and see how it has been variously re-interpreted in film and other media. Conducted in French.

Prerequisite: One French course beyond French 204 or instructor permission

2nd 5 weeks

FREN 359.07 Paris Program: Hybrid Paris 6 credits

Éva S Pósfay

Through literature, cultural texts, and experiential learning in the city, this course will explore the development of both the "Frenchness" and the hybridity that constitute contemporary Paris. Immigrant cultures, notably North African, will also be highlighted. Plays, music, and visits to cultural sites will complement the readings.

Prerequisite: French 230 or beyond and participation in OCS Paris program

Participation in Carleton OCS Paris Program

GERM 150.00 German Music and Culture from Mozart to Rammstein 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Library 344

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 64816

Juliane Schicker

In this course, we survey significant developments in German-language culture, broadly defined, from the Enlightenment to the twentieth century. Students of all disciplines and majors are invited to receive an overview of the music and culture of Germany, Austria, and Switzerland, starting in the 1750s and tracing its impact into the present time. The course includes literature, film, music, language, history, habits, news, etc., and surveys major figures, movements, and their influence on the world’s civilization. The course encourages critical engagement with the material at hand and provides the opportunity to compare it with the students’ own cultural background. Taught in English.

In Translation

GERM 274.00 Weimar Germany: Art, Culture, and the Failure of Democracy 6 credits

Open: Size: 20, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Language & Dining Center 244

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 63976

Kiley Kost

"...many will say: even 1920 is not so horrible. This is how it is: the human being is a machine, culture is in shreds, education is arrogance, spirit is brutality, stupidity is the norm, and the military is sovereign" (Adolf Behne, reporting on a Dada art exhibit). In this class, taught in German, students examine cultural products and visual media of and about the Weimar Republic to understand a critical time in German history and explore how art has been used to cope with societal turbulence. Note: German majors and minors may complete additional work to count this class toward the 300-level course credit requirement.

Prerequisite: German 204 or equivalent

GRK 240.00 Xenophon's Oeconomicus 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Language & Dining Center 202

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 63963

Jordan R Rogers

While ostensibly a dialogue about how to manage one’s household (oikos), Xenophon’s Oeconomicus provides valuable insights into the ideology of land-ownership in classical Greece. In this class, we will read significant portions of Xenophon’s Oeconomicus in Greek as well as other texts, in English and Greek, that explore household economics. Throughout, we will consider what Xenophon’s text reveals about perceptions of gender roles within the home, notions of citizenship, the role of education, and the institution of slavery in the ancient world. Students will also work together to produce a student commentary of the text.

Prerequisite: Greek 204 or equivalent

MUSC 123.00 The American Film Musical 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 230

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 64380

Ronald Rodman

A survey of film musicals from their beginnings in the 1920s to the present. The course will cover the definition and attributes of film musicals, how a film musical differs from a film with music, and then continue with a historical survey of various eras of musicals, such as early sound film musicals, the film musical at its zenith, the adaptation of Broadway musicals to the screen, and current postmodern musicals and animated musicals by Disney and Pixar. The course will also discuss how musicals convey evolving cultural attitudes of gender, race, ethnicity, and sexual orientation, as well as good vs. evil.

Extra Time Required

MUSC 136.00 History of Rock 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center M215

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 64382

Andy A Flory

This course is an introduction to the history of rock music, emphasizing primarily the period between 1954 and the present. Mixing historical and cultural readings with intense listening, we will cover the vast repertoire of rock music and many other associated styles. We will focus on the sounds of the music, learning to distinguish a wide variety of genres, while also tracing the development and transformation of rock and pop styles. The lectures will use a wide variety of multimedia, including commercial audio and video, unpublished audio and video sources, print materials, and technological devices. Knowledge of a technical musical vocabulary and an ability to read music are not required for this course. 

MUSC 204.00 Theory II: Musical Structures 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 230

MTWTHF
8:30am9:40am8:30am9:30am8:30am9:40am
Synonym: 63889

Justin M London

An investigation into the nature of musical sounds and the way they are combined to form rhythms, melodies, harmonies, and form. Topics include the nature of musical pitch, the structure of musical scales and their influence on melody, what gives rise to a sense of tonality, the complexity of rhythmic patterns, and the architecture of musical form. Student work includes building a musical instrument, programming a drum machine, writing computer code to create harmonies and timbres, and an extended music analysis project using empirical methods.

Prerequisite: Music 101, or permission of the instructor as assessed by a diagnostic exam administered at the start of the term

MUSC 239.00 The Philosophy of Music 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 231

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 65940

Justin M London

What is Music, and what exactly is a “musical composition,” especially in the age of recorded music and sampling? Can music tell a story, express an emotion, or convey a proposition? And if music can do any of these things, how does it do it? Last but not least, how are we to judge the value of musical pieces and musical practices? Do we need to judge popular music differently from so-called “art” music?  To address these questions we will listen to a wide range of musical examples, from Bach and Mozart to the Beatles and Jimi Hendrix, and we will read a wide range of writings about music, from Plato, Rousseau, and Kant to current philosophers, including Scruton, Kivy, Davies, Carroll, and Gracyk.

Prerequisite: Previous music or philosophy course or instructor permission

MUSC 313.00 Video Game Music: History, Interpretation, Practice 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 231

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 64023

Brooke H McCorkle

Over the decades, video game music has evolved from simple beeps and boops into a genre that has garnered millions of fans worldwide. This course traces the history of video game music aesthetics and technology. We will consider how it relates to a variety of musical traditions and engages with broader social issues. We will learn to listen for loops, styles, structures, and function in games via direct engagement with primary sources: the games themselves. The course culminates in the practical application of knowledge via a creative project. 

Prerequisite: Music 110 and/or Music 204

POSC 214.00 Visual Representations of Political Thought and Action 3 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

HASE 109

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 65476

Barbara Allen

Visual media offer an alternative method of framing political ideas and events. Images found in such texts as film, posters, and even in statistical tables can enlighten--or mislead. Readings in visual theory, political psychology, and graphic representation will enable you to read images and use these powerful media to convey your ideas and research.

RUSS 228.07 Russia at a Cultural Crossroad Program: Dialogues in the Russophone World 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Synonym: 65832

Victoria Y Thorstensson

In this course we will the address the problem of Russophonia and the changing role of the Russian language in the post-Soviet world. Through discussions of theoretical readings, literary texts and cultural artefacts, we will explore spaces for creative dialogues among writers and artists in the post-Soviet states and the Russophone diasporas. Topics will include the post-colonial search for identity in contemporary art; linguistic, gender and cultural hybridity in prose and poetry; imperial legacies, trauma and (post)memory in historical and auto-fiction; and connections between creative communities and ecological and political activism. Taught in English.

 

Prerequisite: Participation in OCS program in Qazaqstan

Requires Participation in OCS program in Qazaqstan

RUSS 228.XX Russia at a Cultural Crossroad Program: Dialogues in the Russophone World 6 credits

Open: Size: 0, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Synonym: 65831

Victoria Y Thorstensson

In this course we will the address the problem of Russophonia and the changing role of the Russian language in the post-Soviet world. Through discussions of theoretical readings, literary texts and cultural artefacts, we will explore spaces for creative dialogues among writers and artists in the post-Soviet states and the Russophone diasporas. Topics will include the post-colonial search for identity in contemporary art; linguistic, gender and cultural hybridity in prose and poetry; imperial legacies, trauma and (post)memory in historical and auto-fiction; and connections between creative communities and ecological and political activism. Taught in English.

 

Prerequisite: Participation in OCS program in Qazaqstan

Requires Participation in OCS program in Qazaqstan

RUSS 266.00 The Brothers Karamazov 3 credits

Open: Size: 20, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Laird 205

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 65804

Laura Goering

Fyodor Dostoevsky’s last novel, The Brothers Karamazov, is many things: a riveting murder mystery, a probing philosophical treatise, one of the best known novels in world literature, and a complex book worth reading and discussing with serious readers of diverse backgrounds. We will familiarize ourselves with the historical and philosophical context in which it was written, while grappling with the fundamental questions it raises: What does it mean to act morally? Why do humans so often act against their own best interest? How do we reconcile a world of chaos and suffering with the notion of a benevolent god? Conducted entirely in English.

Prerequisite: No prerequisites and no knowledge of Russian literature or history required.

RUSS 267.00 War and Peace 3 credits

Open: Size: 20, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Laird 205

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 65805

Laura Goering

Against the backdrop of the Napoleonic Wars, Lev Tolstoy challenges readers to confront some of the most confounding questions of human existence: How can we reconcile the notion of free will with the seemingly ineluctable forces of history? Is individual moral action possible in war? How can we live a meaningful life in the face of inevitable death? And what might lie after death? In this course we read War and Peace in its cultural and historical context, while also considering how it continues to be relevant to our lives today. Conducted in English.

Prerequisite: No prerequisites and no knowledge of Russian literature or history required.

SPAN 205.01 Conversation and Composition 6 credits

Open: Size: 20, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Library 344

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am

Other Tags:

Synonym: 64982

Jorge Brioso

A course designed to develop the student's oral and written mastery of Spanish. Advanced study of grammar. Compositions and conversations based on cultural and literary topics. There is also an audio-video component focused on current affairs.

Prerequisite: Spanish 204 or equivalent

SPAN 208.00 Coffee and News 2 credits, S/CR/NC only

Open: Size: 10, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Language & Dining Center 302

MTWTHF
2:20pm3:20pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 64984

Silvia López

An excellent opportunity to brush up your Spanish while learning about current issues in Spain and Latin America. The class meets only once a week for an hour. Class requirements include reading specific sections of Spain's leading newspaper, El País, everyday on the internet (El País), and then meeting once a week to exchange ideas over coffee with a small group of students like yourself.

Prerequisite: Spanish 204 or equivalent

SPAN 210.00 Spanish Literature and Art through Graphic Novels 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Language & Dining Center 243

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 65581

Humberto R Huergo

This course serves as a bridge between beginning (204-208) and advanced courses (220-300) in the Department of Spanish. Its main objective is to improve your written and oral skills by looking at some of the best examples of the graphic novel in Spain in recent years, including: Vida y muerte de Lorca (biography), Las Meninas (art history), Yo, asesino (detective novel), Homenaje a Cataluña (Spanish Civil War), Náufragos (urban tales of Madrid and Barcelona), Ardalén (autobiography), and others. Students will be expected to write several short compositions and to give oral presentations applying specific grammar skills in the context of texts and paintings examined in class.

Prerequisite: Spanish 204 or equivalent

SPAN 218.00 Introduction to Latin American Cinema 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Language & Dining Center 242

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 63991

Héctor Melo Ruiz

This course will introduce the student to several production systems and aesthetic traditions in Latin American cinema, from silent cinema to current Netflix productions, allowing students to engage cinematic debates by situating them in their national, regional and global cultural contexts. Be prepared to be immersed in the moving image and its cultural significance through the viewing of many films and critical work on them. Recommended as a foundation course for further study.

Prerequisite: Spanish 204 or the equivalent

SPAN 366.00 Jorge Luis Borges: Less a Man Than a Vast and Complex Literature 6 credits

Jorge Brioso

Borges once said about Quevedo that he was less a man than a vast and complex literature. This phrase is probably the best definition for Borges as well. We will discuss the many writers encompassed by Borges: the vanguard writer, the poet, the detective short story writer, the fantastic story writer, the essayist. We will also study his many literary masks: H. Bustoc Domecq (the apocryphal writer he created with Bioy Casares) a pseudonym he used to write chronicles and detective stories. We will study his impact on contemporary writers and philosophers such as Foucault, Derrida, Roberto Bolaño, etc.

Prerequisite: Spanish 205 or above

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