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Your search for courses for 23/SP and in HASE 105 found 9 courses.

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IDSC 251.01 Windows on the Good Life 2 credits, S/CR/NC only

Open: Size: 18, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

HASE 105

MTWTHF
8:00pm9:45pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 65424

Laurence D Cooper, Alan Rubenstein

Human beings are always and everywhere challenged by the question: What should I do to spend my mortal time well? One way to approach this ultimate challenge is to explore some of the great cultural products of our civilization--works that are a delight to read for their wisdom and artfulness. This series of two-credit courses will explore a philosophical dialogue of Plato in the fall, a work from the Bible in the winter, and a pair of plays by Shakespeare in the spring. The course can be repeated for credit throughout the year and in subsequent years.

IDSC 251.02 Windows on the Good Life 2 credits, S/CR/NC only

Open: Size: 18, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

HASE 105

MTWTHF
3:10pm4:45pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 65425

Laurence D Cooper, Alan Rubenstein

Human beings are always and everywhere challenged by the question: What should I do to spend my mortal time well? One way to approach this ultimate challenge is to explore some of the great cultural products of our civilization--works that are a delight to read for their wisdom and artfulness. This series of two-credit courses will explore a philosophical dialogue of Plato in the fall, a work from the Bible in the winter, and a pair of plays by Shakespeare in the spring. The course can be repeated for credit throughout the year and in subsequent years.

POSC 201.00 Statecraft and the Tools of National Power 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

HASE 105

MTWTHF
8:15am10:00am8:15am10:00am
Synonym: 65556

Jon R Olson, Ross L Wilson, Thomas R Hanson

This course covers the science and art of statecraft, which is the application of the tools of national power. Students will study how nations use diplomatic, economic, and military power to achieve stated national policy objectives. The course is team-taught by three career national security professionals. Case studies are used to assess the application of diplomatic, economic, and military power in the real world. Course readings, papers, and significant classroom discussion will deliver content to students and set the stage for the International Strategic Crisis Negotiation Exercise, which is a graded part of the course.

POSC 210.00 Misinformation, Political Rumors, and Conspiracy Theories 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

HASE 105

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 65123

Christina E Farhart

Why do people believe in conspiracy theories, hold on to misinformed beliefs even in the face of mounting evidence to the contrary, and/or spread political and social rumors that may have little basis in fact? Who is most vulnerable to these various forms of misinformation? What are the normative and political consequences of misperceptions (if any)? This course explores the psychological, political, and philosophical approaches to the study of the causes, consequences, and tenacity of conspiracy beliefs, misinformation, and political rumors, as well as possible approaches that journalists could employ to combat misperceptions.

POSC 227.00 Contemporary Capitalisms 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

HASE 105

MTWTHF
3:10pm4:55pm3:10pm4:55pm
Synonym: 63995

Juan Diego Prieto

This course examines the intersections between political and economic power: how markets are embedded in social and political institutions and how they in turn shape political life and institutions. It begins with a survey of classic and contemporary theoretical frameworks, followed by an overview of the history of contemporary market economies and the search for “development,” both in the global north as well as the south. It then analyzes the contemporary varieties of capitalism across the globe, with a focus on their varying responses to challenges like globalization, economic crises, technological transformations, and climate change.

POSC 232.00 Political Science Lab: Simulation Research 3 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

HASE 105

MTWTHF
8:30am9:40am8:30am9:40am8:30am9:30am
Synonym: 66092

Greg G Marfleet

Simulations, games and role-play exercises are commonly used as experiential learning tools to help students understand complex problems. They can also be used in a research context to explore processes that are difficult to observe in the field or that involve strategic, adversarial and interactive social choices among multiple actors (such as red team exercises). In this lab we will explore the use of simulation as a tool for social inquiry and policy making and use participant observation approaches to gather data from a large simulation exercise.

Prerequisite: Previous or concurrent registration in Political Science 230

Extra time: Departmental Simulation Evening May 19th and Daytime May 20th

POSC 244.00 The Politics of Eurovision 3 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

HASE 105

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 65125

Dev Gupta

At first glance, Eurovision, the decades-long, continent-wide singing contest, is nothing more than a mindless pop culture event. Dismissed as a celebration of (at best) mediocre music, Eurovision seems like it would be the last place to learn about serious politics. In this class, however, we will explore Eurovision as a place where art is deeply political and often engages in debates about gender and sexuality, race, the legacies of colonialism, war and revolution, nationalism, and democracy—not just within the context of the competition itself but how these discussions spill over into broader social and political dynamics.

1st 5 weeks

POSC 261.00 The Global Crisis of Democracy 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

HASE 105

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 63954

Alfred P Montero

Democracy is in trouble worldwide. The most visible indicators are the rise of explicitly anti-democratic leaders and anti-liberal parties that employ populism and exploit ethnic and ideological polarization to acquire power. Democratic norms and institutions have eroded across the globe. Structures that undergirded the positive-sum linkage between industrialization, the rise of labor unions, and democratic parties in much of the West have been transformed in ways that undermine democracy. This course will analyze these and related trends that demonstrate that liberal democracy is suffering a global crisis. Instruction will cover cases across time and from all regions of the world.

POSC 272.00 Constitutional Law II 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

HASE 105

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 65139

Steven G Poskanzer

This course will explore the United States Constitution and the legal doctrines that have emerged from it, using them as lenses through which to understand the history—and shape the future—of this country. Using prominent Supreme Court opinions as teaching tools and loci of debate (including cases on the Court’s recent and current docket), this course will explore the different kind of theoretical approaches with which to make Constitutional arguments and interpret the Constitution. It is one of two paired courses (the other being POSC 271) that complement each other. Both courses will address the structure and functioning of the United States government, and will explore in greater depth the historic Constitutional “trends” towards greater equality and more liberty (albeit slowly, haltingly, and with steps both forward and backward). This course will focus in particular on how gender equality is very much unfinished Constitutional work on our way towards a “more perfect union.” This topic will include an examination of the Court’s recent controversial decision in Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization  In exploring matters of personal liberty, this course will focus in particular on First Amendment freedom of speech and other fundamental rights protected under the 14th Amendment’s Due Process Clause. Finally, in examining governmental structures, this course will emphasize the separation of powers across the branches of the federal government. The course will require close reading of judicial opinions and other texts, and learning how to construct arguments using logic and precedent. POSC 271 is not a prerequisite for POSC 272. The two courses can be taken independently, although having taking POSC 271 will provide students with a broader and more nuanced foundation for exploring the themes covered of this course

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Requirements
You must take 6 credits of each of these.
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You must take 6 credits of each of these,
except Quantitative Reasoning, which requires 3 courses.
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