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Your search for courses for 23/SP and in LEIG 426 found 7 courses.

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GWSS 312.00 Queer and Trans Theory 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 426

MTWTHF
3:10pm4:55pm3:10pm4:55pm
Synonym: 64827

Candace I Moore

This seminar offers students familiar with the foundational terms and concepts in gender and sexuality studies the opportunity to engage in more advanced explorations of relevant topics and debates in contemporary queer and trans theory. Seeing queer theory and trans theory as theoretical traditions that are historically and philosophically entangled but which at times necessarily diverge, the course focuses on “state of the field” essays from Gay and Lesbian Quarterly and Transgender Studies Quarterly as well as works that put gender and sexuality studies into conversation with disability studies, critical race theory, indigenous studies, and critiques of neoliberalism and imperialism.

Prerequisite: Gender, Women's & Sexuality Studies 110, 212 , 334 or Women's & Gender Studies 110, 112 or 200 or instructor consent

HIST 112.00 Freedom of Expression: A Global History 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 426

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 63948

Amna Khalid

Celebrated as the bedrock of democracy, freedom of expression is often seen as an American or western value. Yet the concept has a rich and global history. In this course we will track the long and turbulent history of freedom of expression from ancient Athens and medieval Islamic societies to the Enlightenment and the drive for censorship in totalitarian and colonial societies. Among the questions we will consider are: How have the parameters of free expression changed and developed over time? What is the relationship between free speech and political protest? How has free speech itself been weaponized? How does an understanding of the history of free speech help us think about the challenges of combating hatred and misinformation in today’s internet age?

Applies to multiple history fields, consult the instructor

HIST 263.00 Plagues of Empire 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 426

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 65044

Amna Khalid

The globalization of disease is often seen as a recent phenomenon aided by high-speed communication and travel. This course examines the history of the spread of infectious diseases by exploring the connection between disease, medicine and European imperial expansion. We consider the ways in which European expansion from 1500 onwards changed the disease landscape of the world and how pre-existing diseases in the tropics shaped and thwarted imperial ambitions. We will also question how far Western medicine can be seen as a benefit by examining its role in facilitating colonial expansion and constructing racial and gender difference.

HIST 275.00 Latin American Immigration to the US 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 426

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 65711

Pedro F Quijada

Immigration from Latin America has historically been, and continues to be, a topic of concern and controversy in the United States. This course seeks to provide a clear and informed understanding of the phenomenon. It surveys various migration waves from Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean, and South America. Through a variety of audio-visual sources, scholarship, testimonies/memoirs, and other materials, students will examine the political and economic factors that pushed people out of their countries and pulled them into the United States; the migrants' perilous journey to the north; and the everyday life of these migrants once they are in the U.S.

LING 110.00 Introduction to Linguistics 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 426

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 64580

Jenna T Conklin

The capacity to acquire and use natural languages such as English is surely one of the more remarkable features of human nature. In this course, we explore several aspects of this ability. Topics include the sound systems of natural languages, the structure of words, principles that regulate word order, the course of language acquisition in children, and what these reveal about the nature of the mind.

Sophomore Priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: LING 110.WL0 (Synonym 64581)

LING 115.00 Introduction to the Theory of Syntax 6 credits

Open: Size: 20, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 426

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 64582

Morgan Rood

This course is organized to enable the student to actively participate in the construction of a rather elaborate theory of the nature of human cognitive capacity to acquire and use natural languages. In particular, we concentrate on one aspect of that capacity: the unconscious acquisition of a grammar that enables a speaker of a language to produce and recognize sentences that have not been previously encountered. In the first part of the course, we concentrate on gathering notation and terminology intended to allow an explicit and manageable description. In the second part, we depend on written and oral student contributions in a cooperative enterprise of theory construction.

Sophomore Priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: LING 115.WL0 (Synonym 64583)

PHIL 289.00 Death, Dinner, and Discussion 3 credits, S/CR/NC only

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 426

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 65009

Daniel M Groll

We're all going to die. We all know that. But we seem to spend a lot of our lives avoiding thinking and talking about it. This course aims to remedy that. We will meet weekly to talk about death and, more specifically, the choices we think we might want to make about how we will die and how we want to live at the end of our lives. Students in the class will be asked to think seriously and share their thoughts about these issues. Students will read some popular books that invite people to think about the end of their lives, hold a Death Over Dinner discussion as a class (with the professor), and hold (and write about) a Death Over Dinner discussion with some of their peers outside of class. Be ready to talk and to listen! We'll provide the Kleenex. 

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You must take 6 credits of each of these.
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except Quantitative Reasoning, which requires 3 courses.
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