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Your search for courses for 23/WI and with code: BIOLELECTIVE found 9 courses.

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BIOC 301.00 Survey of Biochemistry 6 credits

Open: Size: 40, Registered: 16, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 305

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 64136

Rachel E Horness

This course applies the principles of chemistry to explore the molecular basis of biological processes. It provides students with a foundational knowledge of biochemistry, with an emphasis on the structure and function of biological macromolecules including nucleic acids and proteins.  Topics include enzyme catalysis and kinetics, bioenergetics, and the organization and regulation of metabolic pathways. Biology majors must also complete BIOC 311 in order for BIOC 301 to count towards the Biology major.

Prerequisite: Biology 126, Chemistry 224, Chemistry 234

Not open to students who have taken CHEM 320 or BIOL 380

BIOL 210.00 Global Change Biology 6 credits

Open: Size: 48, Registered: 24, Waitlist: 0

CMC 206

MTWTHF
8:15am10:00am8:15am10:00am

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 64167

John L Berini

Environmental problems are caused by a complex mix of physical, biological, social, economic, political, and technological factors. This course explores how these environmental problems affect life on Earth by examining the biological processes underlying natural ecological systems and the effects of global environmental changes such as resources consumption and overharvesting, land-use change, climate warming, pollution, extinction and biodiversity loss, and invasive species.

Prerequisite: One introductory science lab course (Biology 125, 126, Chemistry 123, 128, Geology 110, 115 or 120)

Sophomore Priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: BIOL 210.WL0 (Synonym 64168)

BIOL 240.00 Genetics 6 credits

Open: Size: 40, Registered: 28, Waitlist: 0

Hulings 316

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 64169

Jennifer M Ross-Wolff

A study of the transmission of genetic information between generations of organisms, and of the mechanism of expression of information within an individual organism. The main emphasis will be on the physical and chemical basis of heredity; mutational, transmissional and functional analysis of the genetic material, and gene expression.

Prerequisite: Biology 125 and 126 or instructor permission

BIOL 248.00 Behavioral Ecology 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 31, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 236

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 64172

Annie L Bosacker

Behavioral ecologists strive to understand the complex ways that ecological pressures influence the evolution of behavioral strategies. It can be argued that animals face a relatively small set of basic challenges: they must acquire food, water, and mates, and they must avoid danger. Yet we see a rich diversity of solutions to these problems. Consider foraging behavior, for example. All animals must acquire energy, but some filter particles out of sea water, others graze on nearly inedible grasses, while still others hunt in cooperative packs. In this course we will consider such topics as foraging, communication, sociality, and conflict. By focusing on the functions and evolutionary histories of behaviors, we strive to better understand the puzzle of behavioral diversity.

Prerequisite: Biology 125 and 126

BIOL 310.00 Immunology 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 27, Waitlist: 2

Language & Dining Center 104

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 64173

Debby R Walser-Kuntz

This course will examine the role of the immune system in defense, allergic reactions, and autoimmunity. Topics to be covered include the structure and function of antibodies, cytokines, the role of the major histocompatibility complex in antigen presentation, cellular immunity, immunodeficiencies, and current techniques used to study immune responses.

Prerequisite: Biology 125 and 126 and either Biology 240 or 280

No lab

BIOL 332.00 Human Physiology 6 credits

Open: Size: 48, Registered: 40, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 235

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 64174

Matt S Rand, Amy H Moore

Human Physiology seeks to understand the fundamental mechanisms responsible for the diverse functions of the body. Course topics include the function and regulation of the various physiological systems (nervous, circulatory, endocrine, excretory, respiratory, digestive, etc.), biochemistry, cellular physiology, homeostasis and acid-base chemistry. The study of human physiology provides the principal groundwork for internal medicine, pharmacology, and other related health fields. The laboratory includes a variety of experiments focusing on the function and regulation of the human body.

Prerequisite: Biology 125 and 126; Concurrent registration in Biology 333

BIOL 333 required. Students should waitlist for BOTH 333 (lab) and 332 (lecture) to be considered for enrollment from either waitlist.

BIOL 378.00 Seminar: The Origin and Early Evolution of Life 6 credits

Closed: Size: 0, Registered: 12, Waitlist: 0

Olin 104

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 64190

Rika E Anderson

The Earth formed four and a half billion years ago. Evidence suggests that within 700 million years, life had gained a foothold on this planet. We will delve into the primary literature to explore fundamental questions about the origin and evolution of life: How did life arise from non-life on the dynamic young Earth? Where on Earth did life begin? Did life only arise once? What did the first living organisms look like? What was the nature of our last universal common ancestor? How did life alter the planet on which it arose? Could life originate elsewhere in the cosmos?

Prerequisite: Biology 125 and 126 and one additional 200- or 300-level Biology course, or permission of the instructor

Waitlist only

BIOL 385.00 Seminar: Microbial Pathology 6 credits

Closed: Size: 0, Registered: 10, Waitlist: 0

Olin 104

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 64194

Raka M Mitra

Microbes are the most abundant organisms on earth, and microbial pathogens have caused human and plant disease epidemics worldwide. This course will focus upon the pathogenic strategy of a variety of well-studied microbes in order to illustrate our understanding of the molecular and cellular nature of microbial disease. We will analyze current and seminal papers in the primary literature focusing on mechanisms employed by microbes to attack hosts.

Prerequisite: Biology 125 and 126 and either Biology 240 or 280

Waitlist only

IDSC 258.00 Consensus or Contentious? Controversies in Science Then and Now 2 credits

Closed: Size: 15, Registered: 9, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 323

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm
Synonym: 64027

Antony E Adler, Rika E Anderson

Almost every global challenge confronting humankind requires some level of engagement with science and technology. However, finding solutions to our most pressing problems also requires an understanding of how science operates within its social, political, and cultural context. This course will explore the relationship between science and society by examining a series of controversies in science from both the past and the present. We will investigate topics such as biological and social concepts of race, the use of unethically obtained scientific results, the ethics of genomics research, legislation over vaccination mandates, “parachute” science, and climate change denial. Examining the role of science in society will help us understand issues related to the use of evidence, expertise, and the relationship between science and politics. By wrestling with current and historic scientific controversies, we will examine the ways in which scientific disagreements are often as much about values as they are about research methods. 

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Requirements
You must take 6 credits of each of these.
Overlays
You must take 6 credits of each of these,
except Quantitative Reasoning, which requires 3 courses.
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