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Your search for courses for 23/WI and with code: DGAHREFLECTN found 7 courses.

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ARTS 244.00 Alternative Processes 6 credits

Open: Size: 12, Registered: 10, Waitlist: 0

Boliou 130

MTWTHF
12:30pm3:00pm12:30pm3:00pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 65440

Xavier Tavera Castro

Over the last half century, the media environment has become dominantly digital, and the practice of photography has been transformed into a digital one. In response, contemporary artists and image makers have recently been pursuing analog practices in a search for more engaging material output.  In this course, students will be introduced to a series of alternative printing methods that will result in tangible works.  Instruction will be given in cyanotype, liquid light, Van Dyke brown printing, and Platinum Palladium. Experimentation and creative departures will be highly encouraged.

Prerequisite: Previous Studio Art course

CAMS 214.00 Film History III 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 25, Waitlist: 4

Weitz Center 133

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 64235

Jay S Beck

This course is designed to introduce students to recent film history, 1970-present, and the multiple permutations of cinema around the globe. The course charts the development of national cinemas since the 1970s while considering the effects of media consolidation and digital convergence. Moreover, the course examines how global cinemas have reacted to and dealt with the formal influence and economic domination of Hollywood on international audiences. Class lectures, screenings, and discussions will consider how cinema has changed from a primarily national phenomenon to a transnational form in the twenty-first century.

Extra Time required. Evening Screenings.

CAMS 246.00 Documentary Studies 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 24, Waitlist: 4

Weitz Center 132

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 64230

Cecilia M Cornejo

This course explores the relevance and influence of documentary films by closely examining the aesthetic concerns and ethical implications inherent in these productions. We study these works both as artistic undertakings and as documents produced within a specific time, culture, and ideology. Central to our understanding of the form are issues of technology, methodology, and ethics, which are examined thematically as well as chronologically. The course offers an overview of the major historical movements in documentary film along more recent works; it combines screenings, readings, and discussions with the goal of preparing students to both understand and analyze documentary films.

Extra Time Required, weekly evening in-person screenings Tuesdays

CHIN 250.00 Chinese Popular Culture in Translation 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 24, Waitlist: 0

Language & Dining Center 104

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 64519

Shaohua Guo

This course (taught in English) provides an overview of Chinese popular culture from 1949 to the contemporary era, including popular literature, film, posters, music, and blog entries. The course examines both old and new forms of popular culture in relation to social change, cultural spaces, new media technologies, the state, individual expressions, and gender politics. Throughout this course, special attention is paid to the alliance between popular literature and the booming entertainment industry, the making of celebrity culture, and the role digital media plays in shaping China's cultural landscape. The course requires no prior knowledge of Chinese language, literature, or culture.

In translation

ENGL 362.00 Narrative Theory 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 9, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 233

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 64726

Susan Jaret McKinstry

"Does the world really present itself to perception in the form of well-made stories?" asks Hayden White, metahistoriographer. To try to answer that question, we will read contemporary narrative theory by critics from several disciplines and apply their theories to literary texts, films, and cultural objects such as graphic novels, television shows, advertisements, and music videos.

Prerequisite: One 6-credit English foundations course and one additional 6-credit English course or permission of the instructor

LCST 245.00 The Critical Toolbox: Who's Afraid of Theory? 6 credits

Seth E Peabody

This class introduces students to the various theoretical frameworks and the many approaches scholars can use when analyzing a text (whether this text is a film, an image, a literary piece or a performance). What do words like ‘structuralism,’ ‘ecocriticism,’ 'cultural studies,' and ‘postcolonial studies’ refer to? Most importantly, how do they help us understand the world around us? This class will be organized around interdisciplinary theoretical readings and exercises in cultural analysis.

Prerequisite: At least one 200- or 300-level course in Literary/Artistic Analysis (in any language) or instructor permission

SPAN 345.00 Culture, Capitalism and the Commons 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 19, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 235

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 64986

Palmar Álvarez-Blanco

Have you ever wondered if not capitalism, then what? In this course we will critically approach the historical background, the causes and, most importantly, the consequences of the civil and ecological crisis unleashed globally in 2008. Both in its origin and its consequences, this crisis went beyond the financial field, extending into the realms of politics, economics, culture, media and ecology. In light of this context, we will take a transdisciplinary approach to the study of capitalist culture and analyze the main changes that have developed from the cycle of social mobilizations surrounding the "indignados" movement or Spanish 15M in 2011. With a primary focus on Spain, we will concentrate on analyzing cultural artifacts that mark a paradigm shift from a capitalist culture towards the development of a culture of the commons that seeks to improve the living conditions of the social majority, defending both human rights and ecological justice.

Prerequisite: Spanish 205 or equivalent

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except Quantitative Reasoning, which requires 3 courses.
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