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Your search for courses for 23/WI and with code: EUSTTRANNATL found 17 courses.

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ARTH 102.00 Introduction to Art History II 6 credits

Open: Size: 60, Registered: 27, Waitlist: 0

Boliou 104 / Boliou 161

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 64063

Kathleen M Ryor, Baird E Jarman

An introduction to the art and architecture of various geographical areas around the world from the fifteenth century through the present. The course will provide foundational skills (tools of analysis and interpretation) as well as general, historical understanding. It will focus on a select number of major developments in a range of media and cultures, emphasizing the way that works of art function both as aesthetic and material objects and as cultural artifacts and forces. Issues include, for example, humanist and Reformation redefinitions of art in the Italian and Northern Renaissance, realism, modernity and tradition, the tension between self-expression and the art market, and the use of art for political purposes.

ARTH 240.00 Art Since 1945 6 credits

Ross K Elfline

Art from abstract expressionism to the present, with particular focus on issues such as the modernist artist-hero; the emergence of alternative or non-traditional media; the influence of the women's movement and the gay/lesbian liberation movement on contemporary art; and postmodern theory and practice.

Prerequisite: Any one term of art history

CAMS 214.00 Film History III 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 25, Waitlist: 4

Weitz Center 133

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 64235

Jay S Beck

This course is designed to introduce students to recent film history, 1970-present, and the multiple permutations of cinema around the globe. The course charts the development of national cinemas since the 1970s while considering the effects of media consolidation and digital convergence. Moreover, the course examines how global cinemas have reacted to and dealt with the formal influence and economic domination of Hollywood on international audiences. Class lectures, screenings, and discussions will consider how cinema has changed from a primarily national phenomenon to a transnational form in the twenty-first century.

Extra Time required. Evening Screenings.

CCST 270.00 Creative Travel Writing Workshop 6 credits, S/CR/NC only

Closed: Size: 16, Registered: 16, Waitlist: 8

Language & Dining Center 330

MTWTHF
1:50pm4:50pm
Synonym: 65069

Scott D Carpenter

Travelers write. Whether it be in the form of postcards, text messages, blogs, or articles, writing serves to anchor memory and process difference, making foreign experience understandable to us and accessible to others. While examining key examples of the genre, you will draw on your experiences off-campus for your own work. Student essays will be critiqued in a workshop setting, and all work will be revised before final submission. Some experimentation with blended media is also encouraged.

Prerequisite: Students must have participated in an off-campus study program (Carleton or non-Carleton) or instructor permission

ENGL 114.00 Introduction to Medieval Narrative 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 10, Waitlist: 0

Laird 206

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 64704

George G Shuffelton

This class will focus on three of the most popular and closely connected modes of narrative enjoyed by medieval audiences: the epic, the romance, and the saint's life. Readings, drawn primarily from the English and French traditions, will include BeowulfThe Song of Roland, the Arthurian romances of Chretien de Troyes, and legends of St. Alexis and St. Margaret. We will consider how each narrative mode influenced the other, as we encounter warriors and lovers who suffer like saints, and saints who triumph like warriors and lovers. Readings will be in translation or highly accessible modernizations.

ENGL 219.00 Global Shakespeare 3 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 13, Waitlist: 0

Laird 205

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 64719

Pierre Hecker

Shakespeare’s plays have been reimagined and repurposed all over the world, performed on seven continents, and translated into over 100 languages. The course explores how issues of globalization, nationalism, translation (both cultural and linguistic), and (de)colonization inform our understanding of these wonderfully varied adaptations and appropriations. We will examine the social, political, and aesthetic implications of a range of international stage, film, and literary versions as we consider how other cultures respond to the hegemonic original. No prior experience with Shakespeare is necessary.

Second 5 weeks

FREN 206.00 Contemporary French and Francophone Culture 6 credits

Open: Size: 20, Registered: 8, Waitlist: 0

Language & Dining Center 243

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 64773

Chérif Keïta

Through texts, images and films coming from different continents, this class will present Francophone cultures and discuss the connections and tensions that have emerged between France and other French speaking countries. Focused on oral and written expression this class aims to strengthen students’ linguistic skills while introducing them to the academic discipline of French and Francophone studies. The theme will be school and education in the Francophone world.

Prerequisite: French 204 or equivalent

FREN 347.00 Gender and Sexuality in the Francophone World 6 credits

Open: Size: 20, Registered: 11, Waitlist: 0

Language & Dining Center 205

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 64774

Cathy Yandell

Conceptions of gender and sexuality are essential to the study of Francophone cultures, as can be observed in works by the African poet Léopold Senghor and the recent recipient of the Nobel Prize for Literature, Annie Ernaux, among many others. Through the genres of novel, film, graphic novel, and song, we will examine historical and contemporary manifestations of gender (female, male, trans, two-spirit, and others), including the intersectional questions of race and class in context. Particular attention will be given to France, Francophone Africa, and Québec. Conducted in French.

Prerequisite: One course beyond French 204 or instructor permission

HIST 231.00 Mapping the World Before Mercator 6 credits

Victoria Morse

This course will explore early maps primarily in medieval and early modern Europe. After an introduction to the rhetoric of maps and world cartography, we will examine the functions and forms of medieval European and Islamic maps and then look closely at the continuities and transformations in map-making during the period of European exploration. The focus of the course will be on understanding each map within its own cultural context and how maps can be used to answer historical questions. We will work closely with the maps in Gould Library Special Collections to expand campus awareness of the collection.

Extra time is required for a one-time map show in the library during 6a which we will schedule at the beginning of term.

MELA 230.00 Jewish Collective Memory 6 credits

Stacy N Beckwith

Judaism emphasizes transmitting memory from one generation to the next. How have pivotal events and experiences in Jewish history lived on in Jewish collective memory? How do they continue to speak through artistic/literary composition and museum/memorial design? How does Jewish collective memory compare with recorded Jewish history? We will study turning points in Jewish history including the Exodus from Egypt, Jewish expulsion from medieval Spain, the Holocaust, and Israeli independence, as Jews in different times and places have interpreted them with lasting influence. Research includes work with print, film, and other visual/ performative media.

MUSC 211.00 Race, Gender, and Classical Music 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 7, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 231

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 64372

Brooke H McCorkle

This course examines the history of Western classical music through the lens of race and gender. The social, political, economic and cultural ecosystems in which Western classical music evolved provide frameworks for understanding the complex relationships between composers, performers, and audiences both past and present. Through a variety of assignments including forum posts, quizzes, and a final project, students will develop critical thinking, research, and communication skills to help them better understand the role of Western classical music in the world today.

PHIL 272.00 Early Modern Philosophy: Seventeenth and Eighteenth Century Philosophy 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 18, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 304

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 63953

Hope C Sample

We will read selections of writings from various seventeenth and eighteenth century philosophers on metaphysics, epistemology, and ethics. This course will not be limited to any geographic region, as it is open to philosophical traditions from Europe, the Americas, Africa, and Asia. On the metaphysical side, we will cover topics such as time and space, freedom, and divinity. Ethical issues that we will cover include, but are not limited to, moral responsibility, virtue, suffering, and the good life. Further, we will cover epistemic issues concerning belief, perception, and knowledge. In sum, we will gain a deeper insight into perennial philosophical problems as well as an awareness of the assumptions that drive their solutions, given the author’s personal, social, political, and philosophical context.

PHIL 274.00 Existentialism 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 24, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 426

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 65007

Anna Moltchanova

We will consider the emergence and development of major themes of existentialism in the works of Kierkegaard and Nietzsche, as well as "classical" existentialists such as Heidegger, Sartre and De Beauvoir. We will discuss key issues put forward by the existentialist movement, such as "the question of being" and human historicity, freedom and responsibility and look at how different authors analyzed the nature and ambitions of the Self and diverse aspects of subjectivity.

POSC 120.00 Democracy and Dictatorship 6 credits

Closed: Size: 35, Registered: 34, Waitlist: 4

Anderson Hall 329

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 65110

Juan Diego Prieto

An introduction to the array of different democratic and authoritarian political institutions in both developing and developed countries. We will also explore key issues in contemporary politics in countries around the world, such as nationalism and independence movements, revolution, regime change, state-making, and social movements.

Sophomore Priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: POSC 120.WL0 (Synonym 65111)

POSC 257.00 Marxist Political Thought 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 17, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 330

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 65601

Paul Petzschmann

A discussion seminar focussed on an in-depth reading of Karl Marx’s “Capital” as well as an exploration of "Marxism after Marx” in the work of Engels, Lenin and Bernstein. The second part of the course will focus on themes raised by Marx in the Political Economy literature today: economic growth and inequality, the role of the state, taxation and redistribution.

POSC 265.00 Public Policy and Global Capitalism 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 23, Waitlist: 0

HASE 105

MTWTHF
8:30am9:40am8:30am9:40am8:30am9:30am
Synonym: 65128

Alfred P Montero

This course provides a comprehensive introduction to comparative and international public policy. It examines major theories and approaches to public policy design and implementation in several major areas: international policy economy (including the study of international trade and monetary policy, financial regulation, and comparative welfare policy), global public health and comparative healthcare policy, institutional development (including democratic governance, accountability systems, and judicial reform), and environmental public policy.

Prerequisite: Statistics 120 (formerly Mathematics 215) strongly recommended, or instructor permission

POSC 283.00 Separatist Movements 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 25, Waitlist: 0

HASE 105

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 65133

Dev Gupta

This course explores the emergence and resolution of separatist movements around the world. While separatist movements are often associated with the violent dissolution of states, not all separatist movements result in violence and not all separatist movements seek independence. We will investigate the conditions under which separatist pressures are most likely to develop and when such pressures result in actual separation. We will contrast the tactics of movements, from peaceful approaches in places like contemporary Quebec or Scotland, to peaceful outcomes like the "velvet divorce" of Czechoslovakia, to violent insurrections in places like the Philippines, Spain, and Northern Ireland.

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You must take 6 credits of each of these.
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You must take 6 credits of each of these,
except Quantitative Reasoning, which requires 3 courses.
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