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Your search for courses for 23/WI and with code: FFSTSOCSCI found 3 courses.

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POSC 251.00 Modern Political Philosophy: Liberalism and Its Critics 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 13, Waitlist: 0

Laird 205

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 63978

Laurence D Cooper

Liberalism has been the dominant political philosophy of our age, and we who live in a liberal polity have been shaped by it. But liberalism has been, and continues to be, the target of sharp critique. What is liberalism, and what can be said both for and against it? In this course we will examine liberalism’s philosophic roots and engage with some of its most forceful advocates and most profound critics. Readings will be drawn from authors such as Locke, Montesquieu, Rousseau, Marx, Mill, and Tocqueville.

POSC 348.00 Strangers, Foreigners and Exiles* 6 credits

Mihaela Czobor-Lupp

The course explores the role that strangers play in human life, the challenges that foreigners create for democratic politics, the promises they bring to it, as well as the role of exiles in improving the cultural capacity of societies to live with difference. We will read texts by Arendt, Kafka, Derrida, Sophocles, Said, Joseph Conrad, Tzvetan Todorov, and Julia Kristeva. Special attention will be given to the plight of Roma in Europe, as a typical case of strangers that are still perceived nowadays as a menace to the modern sedentary civilization.

SOAN 256.00 Africa: Representation and Conflict 6 credits

Pamela Feldman-Savelsberg

Pairing classics in Africanist anthropology with contemporary re-studies, we explore changes in African societies and in the questions anthropologists have posed about them. We address issues of representation and self-presentation in written ethnographies as well as in African portrait photography. We then turn from the visual to the invisible realm of African witchcraft. Initiation rituals, war, and migration place selfhood and belonging back in this-world contexts. In-depth case studies include, among others: the Cameroon Grassfields, the Bemba of Zambia, and the Nuer of South Sudan.

Prerequisite: The department strongly recommends that Sociology/Anthropology 110 or 111 be taken prior to enrolling in courses numbered 200 or above

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except Quantitative Reasoning, which requires 3 courses.
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