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Your search for courses for 23/WI and with code: HISTMODERN found 13 courses.

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HIST 125.00 African American History I: From Africa to the Civil War 6 credits

Rebecca J Brueckmann

This course is a survey of early African American history. It will introduce students to major themes and events while also covering historical interpretations and debates in the field. Core themes of the course include migration, conflict, and culture. Beginning with autonomous African politics, the course traces the development of the United States through the experiences of enslaved and free African American women and men to the Civil War. The main aim of the course is for students to become familiar with key issues and developments in African American history and their centrality to understanding U.S. history.

HIST 151.00 History of Modern Japan 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 402

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 65031

Seungjoo Yoon

This course explores the modern transformation of Japanese society, politics, economy and culture from the Meiji Restoration of 1868 to the present. It is designed to provide students with an opportunity to explore basic issues and problems relating to modern Japanese history and international relations. Topics include the intellectual crisis of the late Tokugawa period, the Meiji Constitution, the development of an interior democracy, class and gender, the rise of Japanese fascism, the Pacific War, and postwar developments.

HIST 170.00 Modern Latin America 1810-Present 6 credits

Pedro F Quijada

Modern Latin American history is marked by both violent divisions and creative cooperation, nationalist proclamations and imperialist incursions, and democratic pursuits and dictatorial repression. This course offers a survey of this complex regional history from independence movements at the beginning of the nineteenth century through globalization in the twenty-first century. It addresses methodological issues that include the significance of multiple historical perspectives and the interpretation of sources. It considers the relationship between individuals and larger social contexts with an emphasis on race, ethnicity, class, citizenship status, and gender. It places Latin American culture and politics in regional and global contexts. 

HIST 205.00 American Environmental History 6 credits

George H Vrtis

Environmental concerns, conflicts, and change mark the course of American history, from the distant colonial past to our own day. This course will consider the nature of these eco-cultural developments, focusing on the complicated ways that human thought and perception, culture and society, and natural processes and biota have all combined to forge Americans' changing relationship with the natural world. Topics will include Native American subsistence strategies, Euroamerican settlement, industrialization, urbanization, consumption, and the environmental movement. As we explore these issues, one of our overarching goals will be to develop an historical context for thinking deeply about contemporary environmental dilemmas.

HIST 212.00 The Era of the American Revolution 6 credits

Serena R Zabin

How Revolutionary was the American Revolution? This class will examine the American Revolution as both a process and a phenomenon. For whom, for what, and how was the United States created? We will consider the relationship of the American Revolution to social, cultural, economic, political, and ideological change in the lives of Americans from the founding fathers to the disenfranchised, focusing on the period 1750-1790. 

HIST 220.00 From Blackface to Blaxploitation: Black History and/in Film 6 credits

Rebecca J Brueckmann

This course focuses on the representation of African American history in popular US-American movies. It will introduce students to the field of visual history, using cinema as a primary source. Through films from the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, the seminar will analyze African American history, (pop-)cultural depictions, and memory culture. We will discuss subjects, narrative arcs, stylistic choices, production design, performative and film industry practices, and historical receptions of movies. The topics include slavery, racial segregation and white supremacy, the Black Freedom Movement, controversies and conflicts in Black communities, Black LGBTQIA+ history, ghettoization and police brutality, Black feminism, and Afrofuturism.

HIST 250.00 Modern Germany 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 7, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 426

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 65034

David G Tompkins

This course offers a comprehensive examination of German history in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. We will look at the German-speaking peoples of Central Europe through the prism of politics, society, culture, and the economy. Through a range of readings, we will grapple with the many complex and contentious issues that have made German history such an interesting area of intellectual inquiry.

HIST 258.00 Korean History in Films & Testimonies 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 7, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 301

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 65482

Seungjoo Yoon

What are the limits and promises of putting history on screen, and vice versa? What would be a better way to convey the sentiments of a human being who must make a moral choice in a distinctive historical circumstance? This course explores the dynamic relationship between testimony-giving and filmmaking about the lived experience in Korea in the recent past. We will focus on the voices of ordinary people, especially those shaped by female and downtrodden citizens. Drawing examples from films, diaries, memoirs, autobiographies, eyewitnesses, and/or novels, students will analyze an enduring value orientation of a historical figure of their choice.

Extra Time Required

HIST 267.00 Muslims and Modernity 6 credits

Adeeb Khalid

Through readings in primary sources in translation, we will discuss the major intellectual and cultural movements that have influenced Muslim thinkers from the nineteenth century on. Topics include modernism, nationalism, socialism, and fundamentalism.

Through readings in primary sources in translation, we will discuss the major intellectual and cultural movements that have influenced Muslim thinkers from the nineteenth century on. Topics include modernism, nationalism, socialism, and fundamentalism.

HIST 268.07 Globalization & Local Responses in India Program: History, Globalization, and Politics in Modern India 6 credits

Open: Size: 20, Registered: 10, Waitlist: 0

Synonym: 63900

Brendan P LaRocque

Indian democracy presents a complicated social and political terrain that is being reshaped and remapped by a wide variety of efforts to bring about economic development, social change, political representation, justice, and equality. In this course we will examine, among other topics, the history of modern India with a focus on political movements centered on issues of colonialism, nationalism, class, gender, and caste. We will also examine changes in contemporary India brought about by globalization, and study how particular groups and communities have reacted and adapted to these developments.

Prerequisite: Acceptance into the India OCS Program required

OCS India Program

HIST 279.00 Central American Revolutions 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 12, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 202

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 65712

Pedro F Quijada

Throughout the 1970s and 1980s, civil war and political violence swept the Central American isthmus. The impact of these conflicts is still felt in the region as well as in the United States. This course examines the regional as well as the international factors that contributed to the rise of these armed conflicts. Through the examination of print and audio-visual primary sources as well as scholarship students will learn about the origins, development, and legacies of these revolutions. We will examine the colonial legacies, capitalist development, ethnic and racial conflict, foreign intervention, civil wars, and, finally, the consequential waves of migration to the U.S. and to other parts of the world.

HIST 308.00 American Cities and Nature 6 credits

George H Vrtis

Since the nation's founding, the percentage of Americans living in cities has risen nearly sixteenfold, from about five percent to the current eighty-one percent. This massive change has spawned legions of others, and all of them have bearing on the complex ways that American cities and city-dwellers have shaped and reshaped the natural world. This course will consider the nature of cities in American history, giving particular attention to the dynamic linkages binding these cultural epicenters to ecological communities, environmental forces and resource flows, to eco-politics and social values, and to those seemingly far-away places we call farms and wilderness. 

Prerequisite: History 205 is recommended but not required

HIST 360.00 Muslims and Modernity 6 credits

Adeeb Khalid

Through readings in primary sources in translation, we will discuss the major intellectual and cultural movements that have influenced Muslim thinkers from the nineteenth century on. Topics include modernism, nationalism, socialism, and fundamentalism.

Prerequisite: At least one prior course in the history of the Middle East or Central Asia or Islam

Not open to first year students. First year students should register in HIST 267.

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except Quantitative Reasoning, which requires 3 courses.
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