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Your search for courses for 23/WI and with code: PPOLEP found 7 courses.

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BIOL 210.00 Global Change Biology 6 credits

Open: Size: 48, Registered: 24, Waitlist: 0

CMC 206

MTWTHF
8:15am10:00am8:15am10:00am

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 64167

John L Berini

Environmental problems are caused by a complex mix of physical, biological, social, economic, political, and technological factors. This course explores how these environmental problems affect life on Earth by examining the biological processes underlying natural ecological systems and the effects of global environmental changes such as resources consumption and overharvesting, land-use change, climate warming, pollution, extinction and biodiversity loss, and invasive species.

Prerequisite: One introductory science lab course (Biology 125, 126, Chemistry 123, 128, Geology 110, 115 or 120)

Sophomore Priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: BIOL 210.WL0 (Synonym 64168)

ECON 271.00 Economics of Natural Resources and the Environment 6 credits

Mark T Kanazawa

This course focuses on environmental economics, energy economics, and the relationship between them. Economic incentives for pollution abatement, the industrial organization of energy production, optimal depletion rates of energy sources, and the environmental and economic consequences of alternate energy sources are analyzed.

Prerequisite: Economics 111

ENTS 212.00 Global Food Systems 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 5, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 132

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 64745

Tsegaye H Nega

The course offers a survey of the world's food systems--and its critics--from the initial domestication of plants and animals to our day. We will begin by examining the critical theoretical and foundational issues on the subject, and then turn to a series of case studies that illuminate major themes around the world. Topics will include land and animal husbandry, the problem of food security, food politics, the Green Revolution, biotechnology, and the implications of global climate change. Throughout the course, students will assess and seek to integrate differing disciplinary and methodological approaches. The class will include field experiences.

ENTS 215.00 Environmental Ethics 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 23, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 230

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 65800

Colleen M Carpenter

This course is an introduction to the central ethical debates in environmental policy and practice, as well as some of the major traditions of environmental thought. It investigates such questions as whether we can have moral duties towards animals, ecosystems, or future generations; what is the ethical basis for wilderness preservation; and what is the relationship between environmentalism and social justice.

ENTS 244.00 Biodiversity Conservation and Development 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 7, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 132

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 64746

Tsegaye H Nega

How can the need for intensive human social and economic development be reconciled with the conservation of biodiversity? This course explores the wide range of actions that people take at a local, national, and international level to address this question. We will use political ecology and conservation biology as theoretical frameworks to examine the role of traditional and indigenous approaches to biodiversity conservation as well as contemporary debates about integrated conservation development across a spectrum of cultures in North America, Africa, Latin America, and Asia.

HIST 205.00 American Environmental History 6 credits

George H Vrtis

Environmental concerns, conflicts, and change mark the course of American history, from the distant colonial past to our own day. This course will consider the nature of these eco-cultural developments, focusing on the complicated ways that human thought and perception, culture and society, and natural processes and biota have all combined to forge Americans' changing relationship with the natural world. Topics will include Native American subsistence strategies, Euroamerican settlement, industrialization, urbanization, consumption, and the environmental movement. As we explore these issues, one of our overarching goals will be to develop an historical context for thinking deeply about contemporary environmental dilemmas.

HIST 308.00 American Cities and Nature 6 credits

George H Vrtis

Since the nation's founding, the percentage of Americans living in cities has risen nearly sixteenfold, from about five percent to the current eighty-one percent. This massive change has spawned legions of others, and all of them have bearing on the complex ways that American cities and city-dwellers have shaped and reshaped the natural world. This course will consider the nature of cities in American history, giving particular attention to the dynamic linkages binding these cultural epicenters to ecological communities, environmental forces and resource flows, to eco-politics and social values, and to those seemingly far-away places we call farms and wilderness. 

Prerequisite: History 205 is recommended but not required

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You must take 6 credits of each of these.
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You must take 6 credits of each of these,
except Quantitative Reasoning, which requires 3 courses.
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