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Your search for courses for 23/WI and with Overlay: IS found 74 courses.

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ARCN 211.00 Coercion and Exploitation: Material Histories of Labor 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 6, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 121

MTWTHF
8:15am10:00am8:15am10:00am
Synonym: 64057

Sarah A Kennedy

What do antebellum plantations, Spanish missions, British colonies in Australia, mining camps in Latin America, and Roman estates all have in common? All are examples of unfair/unfree and forced labor in colonial and imperial settings. This class will review archaeological, archival, and ethnographic cases of past coerced and exploitative labor, and compare them with modern cases such as human trafficking, child slavery, bonded labor, and forced marriage. Case studies include the Andes under Inka and Spanish rule, North American and Caribbean plantations, British colonial Australia, and Dutch colonial Asia.

ARTH 102.00 Introduction to Art History II 6 credits

Open: Size: 60, Registered: 27, Waitlist: 0

Boliou 104 / Boliou 161

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 64063

Kathleen M Ryor, Baird E Jarman

An introduction to the art and architecture of various geographical areas around the world from the fifteenth century through the present. The course will provide foundational skills (tools of analysis and interpretation) as well as general, historical understanding. It will focus on a select number of major developments in a range of media and cultures, emphasizing the way that works of art function both as aesthetic and material objects and as cultural artifacts and forces. Issues include, for example, humanist and Reformation redefinitions of art in the Italian and Northern Renaissance, realism, modernity and tradition, the tension between self-expression and the art market, and the use of art for political purposes.

ARTH 155.00 Islamic Art and Architecture 6 credits

Jessica F Keating

This course surveys the art and architecture of societies where Muslims were dominant or where they formed significant minorities from the seventh through the nineteenth centuries. It examines the form and function of architecture and works of art as well as the social, historical and cultural contexts, patterns of use, and evolving meanings attributed to art by the users. The course follows a chronological order, where selected visual materials are treated along chosen themes. Themes include the creation of a distinctive visual culture in the emerging Islamic polity; cultural interconnections along trade and pilgrimage routes; and westernization.

ARTH 220.00 The Origins of Manga: Japanese Prints 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 25, Waitlist: 2

Boliou 161

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 64066

Kathleen M Ryor

Pictures of the floating world, or ukiyoe, were an integral part of popular culture in Japan and functioned as illustrations, advertisements, and souvenirs. This course will examine the development of both style and subject matter in Japanese prints within the socio-economic context of the seventeenth through twentieth centuries. Emphasis will be placed on the prominent position of women and the nature of gendered activity in these prints.

ARTS 275.07 Studio Art Program: The Physical and Cultural Environment 6 credits, S/CR/NC only

Closed: Size: 26, Registered: 26, Waitlist: 0

Other Tags:

Synonym: 63910

Eleanor M Jensen

This is a wide-ranging course that asks students to engage with their surroundings and make broad connections during the South Pacific program. It examines ecological topics, such as natural history, invasive species, conservation efforts, and how the physical landscape has changed since colonialism. Students will also study indigenous people’s history, culture, art, and profound relationship to landscape. This course includes readings, films, local speakers, and diverse site visits.

Prerequisite: Acceptance to Carleton OCS program

OCS South Pacific Program

ASST 130.07 Globalization & Local Responses in India Program: Tourism and Development in India 3 credits, S/CR/NC only

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 11, Waitlist: 0

Synonym: 63901

Brendan P LaRocque

This course will examine concepts and practices regarding socio-economic development in India, with a special focus on the role of tourism as part of the process of globalization. We will study the scholarly writings and debates around the varied agendas and ideologies concerning development, and analyze the different approaches to economic growth that have historically been dominant in India. As part of our learning process, we will visit numerous sites wherein economic development is being undertaken, including urban and rural locales as well as tourist and pilgrimage sites. This course will include scholarly readings, instructor and guest lectures, and require student presentations of their work.

OCS India Program

CAMS 214.00 Film History III 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 25, Waitlist: 4

Weitz Center 133

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 64235

Jay S Beck

This course is designed to introduce students to recent film history, 1970-present, and the multiple permutations of cinema around the globe. The course charts the development of national cinemas since the 1970s while considering the effects of media consolidation and digital convergence. Moreover, the course examines how global cinemas have reacted to and dealt with the formal influence and economic domination of Hollywood on international audiences. Class lectures, screenings, and discussions will consider how cinema has changed from a primarily national phenomenon to a transnational form in the twenty-first century.

Extra Time required. Evening Screenings.

CAMS 246.00 Documentary Studies 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 24, Waitlist: 4

Weitz Center 132

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 64230

Cecilia M Cornejo

This course explores the relevance and influence of documentary films by closely examining the aesthetic concerns and ethical implications inherent in these productions. We study these works both as artistic undertakings and as documents produced within a specific time, culture, and ideology. Central to our understanding of the form are issues of technology, methodology, and ethics, which are examined thematically as well as chronologically. The course offers an overview of the major historical movements in documentary film along more recent works; it combines screenings, readings, and discussions with the goal of preparing students to both understand and analyze documentary films.

Extra Time Required, weekly evening in-person screenings Tuesdays

CCST 208.00 International Coffee and News 2 credits, S/CR/NC only

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 202

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm
Synonym: 65067

David G Tompkins

Have you just returned from Asia, Africa, Europe, or South America? This course is an excellent way to keep in touch with the culture (and, when appropriate, the language) you left behind. Relying on magazines and newspapers around the world, students will discuss common topics and themes representing a wide array of regions. You may choose to read the press in the local language, or read English-language media about your region, meeting once each week for conversational exchange. (Language of conversation is English.)

Prerequisite: Students must have participated in an off-campus study program (Carleton or non-Carleton) or instructor permission

CCST 270.00 Creative Travel Writing Workshop 6 credits, S/CR/NC only

Closed: Size: 16, Registered: 16, Waitlist: 8

Language & Dining Center 330

MTWTHF
1:50pm4:50pm
Synonym: 65069

Scott D Carpenter

Travelers write. Whether it be in the form of postcards, text messages, blogs, or articles, writing serves to anchor memory and process difference, making foreign experience understandable to us and accessible to others. While examining key examples of the genre, you will draw on your experiences off-campus for your own work. Student essays will be critiqued in a workshop setting, and all work will be revised before final submission. Some experimentation with blended media is also encouraged.

Prerequisite: Students must have participated in an off-campus study program (Carleton or non-Carleton) or instructor permission

CCST 398.00 The Cross-Cultural Panorama: A Capstone Workshop 2 credits, S/CR/NC only

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 12, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 202

MTWTHF
3:10pm4:20pm
Synonym: 65070

David G Tompkins, Paul Petzschmann

The work of Cross-Cultural Studies traverses many disciplines, often engaging with experiences that are difficult to capture in traditional formats. In this course students will create an ePortfolio that reflects, deepens, and narrates the various forms of cross-cultural experience they have had at Carleton, drawing on coursework and off-campus study, as well as such extra-curricular activities as talks, service learning, internships and fellowships. Guided by readings and prompts, students will write a reflective essay articulating the coherence of the parts, describing both the process and the results of their pathway through the minor. Considered a capstone for CCST, but for anyone looking to thread together their experiences across culture. Course is taught as a workshop. 

CHIN 250.00 Chinese Popular Culture in Translation 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 24, Waitlist: 0

Language & Dining Center 104

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 64519

Shaohua Guo

This course (taught in English) provides an overview of Chinese popular culture from 1949 to the contemporary era, including popular literature, film, posters, music, and blog entries. The course examines both old and new forms of popular culture in relation to social change, cultural spaces, new media technologies, the state, individual expressions, and gender politics. Throughout this course, special attention is paid to the alliance between popular literature and the booming entertainment industry, the making of celebrity culture, and the role digital media plays in shaping China's cultural landscape. The course requires no prior knowledge of Chinese language, literature, or culture.

In translation

CLAS 240.00 Rome: From Village to Superpower 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 24, Waitlist: 5

Language & Dining Center 104

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 64403

Jake N Morton

This class will investigate how Rome rose from a humble village of outcasts and refugees to become the preeminent power in the entire Mediterranean. We will trace Rome's political evolution from kings to the Republic, alongside their gradual takeover of the Italian peninsula. We will study how Rome then swiftly overpowered what had been the most powerful kingdoms in the Mediterranean and established themselves as dominant. Who were these Romans and what were their political, military, religious, and social systems that enabled them to accomplish so much? What critical events shaped their development and ultimately led to total political control of the Mediterranean world?

ECON 240.00 Microeconomics of Development 6 credits

Faress F Bhuiyan

This course explores household behavior in developing countries. We will cover areas including fertility decisions, health and mortality, investment in education, the intra-household allocation of resources, household structure, and the marriage market. We will also look at the characteristics of land, labor, and credit markets, particularly technology adoption; land tenure and tenancy arrangements; the role of agrarian institutions in the development process; and the impacts of alternative politics and strategies in developing countries. The course complements Economics 241.

Prerequisite: Economics 111

ENGL 214.00 Revenge Tragedy 3 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 16, Waitlist: 0

Laird 205

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 64718

Pierre Hecker

Madness, murder, conspiracy, poison, incest, rape, ghosts, and lots of blood: the fashion for revenge tragedy in Elizabethan and Jacobean England led to the creation of some of the most brilliant, violent, funny, and deeply strange plays in the history of the language. Authors may include Cary, Chapman, Ford, Marston, Middleton, Kyd, Tourneur, and Webster.

1st 5 weeks

ENGL 219.00 Global Shakespeare 3 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 13, Waitlist: 0

Laird 205

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 64719

Pierre Hecker

Shakespeare’s plays have been reimagined and repurposed all over the world, performed on seven continents, and translated into over 100 languages. The course explores how issues of globalization, nationalism, translation (both cultural and linguistic), and (de)colonization inform our understanding of these wonderfully varied adaptations and appropriations. We will examine the social, political, and aesthetic implications of a range of international stage, film, and literary versions as we consider how other cultures respond to the hegemonic original. No prior experience with Shakespeare is necessary.

Second 5 weeks

ENGL 281.07 London Program: London as City: Londinium to the Anthropocene 6 credits

Peter J Balaam

Readings in literature, urban studies, and the environmental humanities will ground practical exercises helping students to explore cosmopolitan theories of walking, mapping, paying attention, and reading the city. Honing practices of journeying, observing, curating, and collecting, students will make themselves locally expert on one or more of London’s streets or neighborhoods. Designated film screenings, lectures, exhibits, and the natural and built environment will help us to read London’s ever-changing human text over the last two millenia. What human processes are at work on any street in London; and how might they include you?

Prerequisite: Participation in OCS London Program

For students participating in OCS London Program

ENGL 282.07 London Program: London Theater 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 25, Waitlist: 0

Synonym: 64725

Peter J Balaam

Students will attend productions of both classic and contemporary plays in London and Stratford-on-Avon and do related reading. Class discussions will focus on dramatic genres and themes, dramaturgy, acting styles, and design. Guest speakers may include actors, critics, and directors. Students will take backstage tours, keep a theater journal, and work on theater criticism and reviews.

Participation in OCS London Program

ENGL 381.07 London as a City: Londinium to the Anthropocene 6 credits

Peter J Balaam

Readings in literature, urban studies, and the environmental humanities will ground practical exercises helping students to explore cosmopolitan theories of walking, mapping, paying attention, and reading the city. Honing practices of journeying, observing, curating, and collecting, students will make themselves locally expert on one or more of London’s streets or neighborhoods. Designated film screenings, lectures, exhibits, and the natural and built environment will help us to read London’s ever-changing human text over the last two millenia. What human processes are at work on any street in London; and how might they include you?

Prerequisite: One English foundations course and one other 6 credit English course or permission of instructor

For students pariticipating in OCS London Program

ENTS 212.00 Global Food Systems 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 8, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 132

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 64745

Tsegaye H Nega

The course offers a survey of the world's food systems--and its critics--from the initial domestication of plants and animals to our day. We will begin by examining the critical theoretical and foundational issues on the subject, and then turn to a series of case studies that illuminate major themes around the world. Topics will include land and animal husbandry, the problem of food security, food politics, the Green Revolution, biotechnology, and the implications of global climate change. Throughout the course, students will assess and seek to integrate differing disciplinary and methodological approaches. The class will include field experiences.

ENTS 244.00 Biodiversity Conservation and Development 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 9, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 132

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 64746

Tsegaye H Nega

How can the need for intensive human social and economic development be reconciled with the conservation of biodiversity? This course explores the wide range of actions that people take at a local, national, and international level to address this question. We will use political ecology and conservation biology as theoretical frameworks to examine the role of traditional and indigenous approaches to biodiversity conservation as well as contemporary debates about integrated conservation development across a spectrum of cultures in North America, Africa, Latin America, and Asia.

ENTS 251.00 Field Study in Sustainability in Oaxaca 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 18, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 402

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 63880

Daniel Hernández, Constanza C Ocampo-Raeder

A field-based investigation of socio-ecological systems in Oaxaca, Mexico that will allow students to draw compaisons with similar systems in Minnesota. During winter break, we will visit the city of Oaxaca and neighboring villages to document and research systems of agriculture, sustainable forestry, and ecotourism, emphasizing the integration of methodologies in anthropology and ecology. Following the winter break trip, students will complete and present their research projects. This course is the second part of a two term sequence beginning with Environmental Studies 250.

Prerequisite: Prior term registration in Environmental Studies 250. At least one term of introductory Spanish (or equivalent proficiency) is required

Winter Break Program in Oaxaca Mexico

EUST 110.00 The Power of Place: Memory and Counter-Memory in the European City 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 16, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 305

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 64322

Paul Petzschmann, Baird E Jarman, Mihaela Czobor-Lupp,

This team-taught interdisciplinary course explores the relationship between memory, place and power in Europe’s cities. It examines the practices through which individuals and groups imagine, negotiate and contest their past in public spaces through art, literature, film and architecture. The instructors will draw on their research and teaching experience in urban centers of Europe after a thorough introduction to the study of memory across different disciplines. Students will be challenged to think critically about larger questions regarding the possibility of national and local memories as the foundation of identity and pride but also of guilt and shame. 

FREN 206.00 Contemporary French and Francophone Culture 6 credits

Open: Size: 20, Registered: 8, Waitlist: 0

Language & Dining Center 243

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 64773

Chérif Keïta

Through texts, images and films coming from different continents, this class will present Francophone cultures and discuss the connections and tensions that have emerged between France and other French speaking countries. Focused on oral and written expression this class aims to strengthen students’ linguistic skills while introducing them to the academic discipline of French and Francophone studies. The theme will be school and education in the Francophone world.

Prerequisite: French 204 or equivalent

FREN 210.00 Coffee and News 2 credits, S/CR/NC only

Closed: Size: 15, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 1

Language & Dining Center 335

MTWTHF
3:10pm4:20pm
Synonym: 64766

Cathy Yandell

Keep up your French while learning about current issues in France, as well as world issues from a French perspective. Class meets once a week for an hour. Requirements include reading specific sections of leading French newspapers, (Le Monde, Libération, etc.) on the internet, and then meeting once a week to exchange ideas over coffee with a small group of students.

Prerequisite: French 204 or instructor approval

Sophomore Priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: FREN 210.WL0 (Synonym 64767)

FREN 347.00 Gender and Sexuality in the Francophone World 6 credits

Open: Size: 20, Registered: 11, Waitlist: 0

Language & Dining Center 205

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 64774

Cathy Yandell

Conceptions of gender and sexuality are essential to the study of Francophone cultures, as can be observed in works by the African poet Léopold Senghor and the recent recipient of the Nobel Prize for Literature, Annie Ernaux, among many others. Through the genres of novel, film, graphic novel, and song, we will examine historical and contemporary manifestations of gender (female, male, trans, two-spirit, and others), including the intersectional questions of race and class in context. Particular attention will be given to France, Francophone Africa, and Québec. Conducted in French.

Prerequisite: One course beyond French 204 or instructor permission

GERM 214.00 What’s New: The Latest Works in German-Speaking Media 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 7, Waitlist: 0

Hulings 316

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 63940

Juliane Schicker

What products in literature, film, and other media did German-speaking audiences consume in the recent past? What topics do artists address and media outlets discuss? In this course, we will read, watch, and examine various texts and films that were published or premiered in the last ten years or so in the German language. These works, written by a diverse range of artists, reflect on and respond to the turbulent recent history not only in Germany, Austria, and Switzerland, but also more globally. They will help us determine how people express their most urgent challenges and how these texts participate in public debates. 

Prerequisite: German 204 or the equivalent.

HIST 111.00 Uncharted Waters: The History of Society and the Sea 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 29, Waitlist: 6

Leighton 304

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 63964

Antony E Adler

This course introduces students to maritime history, marine environmental history, and issues in contemporary marine policy. While traditional histories have framed the sea as an empty space and obstacle to be traversed, or as a battleground, we will approach the ocean as a contact zone, a space of labor, and as the site of focused scientific research, thereby emphasizing human interaction with the oceans. We will examine how people have come to know, utilize, and govern the world’s oceans across time and space, and we will explore how this history informs contemporary issues in maritime law, governance, and ocean conservation.

HIST 151.00 History of Modern Japan 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 17, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 402

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 65031

Seungjoo Yoon

This course explores the modern transformation of Japanese society, politics, economy and culture from the Meiji Restoration of 1868 to the present. It is designed to provide students with an opportunity to explore basic issues and problems relating to modern Japanese history and international relations. Topics include the intellectual crisis of the late Tokugawa period, the Meiji Constitution, the development of an interior democracy, class and gender, the rise of Japanese fascism, the Pacific War, and postwar developments.

HIST 170.00 Modern Latin America 1810-Present 6 credits

Pedro F Quijada

Modern Latin American history is marked by both violent divisions and creative cooperation, nationalist proclamations and imperialist incursions, and democratic pursuits and dictatorial repression. This course offers a survey of this complex regional history from independence movements at the beginning of the nineteenth century through globalization in the twenty-first century. It addresses methodological issues that include the significance of multiple historical perspectives and the interpretation of sources. It considers the relationship between individuals and larger social contexts with an emphasis on race, ethnicity, class, citizenship status, and gender. It places Latin American culture and politics in regional and global contexts. 

HIST 231.00 Mapping the World Before Mercator 6 credits

Victoria Morse

This course will explore early maps primarily in medieval and early modern Europe. After an introduction to the rhetoric of maps and world cartography, we will examine the functions and forms of medieval European and Islamic maps and then look closely at the continuities and transformations in map-making during the period of European exploration. The focus of the course will be on understanding each map within its own cultural context and how maps can be used to answer historical questions. We will work closely with the maps in Gould Library Special Collections to expand campus awareness of the collection.

Extra time is required for a one-time map show in the library during 6a which we will schedule at the beginning of term.

HIST 250.00 Modern Germany 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 8, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 426

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 65034

David G Tompkins

This course offers a comprehensive examination of German history in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. We will look at the German-speaking peoples of Central Europe through the prism of politics, society, culture, and the economy. Through a range of readings, we will grapple with the many complex and contentious issues that have made German history such an interesting area of intellectual inquiry.

HIST 258.00 Korean History in Films & Testimonies 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 7, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 301

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 65482

Seungjoo Yoon

What are the limits and promises of putting history on screen, and vice versa? What would be a better way to convey the sentiments of a human being who must make a moral choice in a distinctive historical circumstance? This course explores the dynamic relationship between testimony-giving and filmmaking about the lived experience in Korea in the recent past. We will focus on the voices of ordinary people, especially those shaped by female and downtrodden citizens. Drawing examples from films, diaries, memoirs, autobiographies, eyewitnesses, and/or novels, students will analyze an enduring value orientation of a historical figure of their choice.

Extra Time Required

HIST 267.00 Muslims and Modernity 6 credits

Adeeb Khalid

Through readings in primary sources in translation, we will discuss the major intellectual and cultural movements that have influenced Muslim thinkers from the nineteenth century on. Topics include modernism, nationalism, socialism, and fundamentalism.

Through readings in primary sources in translation, we will discuss the major intellectual and cultural movements that have influenced Muslim thinkers from the nineteenth century on. Topics include modernism, nationalism, socialism, and fundamentalism.

HIST 268.07 Globalization & Local Responses in India Program: History, Globalization, and Politics in Modern India 6 credits

Open: Size: 20, Registered: 11, Waitlist: 0

Synonym: 63900

Brendan P LaRocque

Indian democracy presents a complicated social and political terrain that is being reshaped and remapped by a wide variety of efforts to bring about economic development, social change, political representation, justice, and equality. In this course we will examine, among other topics, the history of modern India with a focus on political movements centered on issues of colonialism, nationalism, class, gender, and caste. We will also examine changes in contemporary India brought about by globalization, and study how particular groups and communities have reacted and adapted to these developments.

Prerequisite: Acceptance into the India OCS Program required

OCS India Program

HIST 279.00 Central American Revolutions 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 14, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 202

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 65712

Pedro F Quijada

Throughout the 1970s and 1980s, civil war and political violence swept the Central American isthmus. The impact of these conflicts is still felt in the region as well as in the United States. This course examines the regional as well as the international factors that contributed to the rise of these armed conflicts. Through the examination of print and audio-visual primary sources as well as scholarship students will learn about the origins, development, and legacies of these revolutions. We will examine the colonial legacies, capitalist development, ethnic and racial conflict, foreign intervention, civil wars, and, finally, the consequential waves of migration to the U.S. and to other parts of the world.

HIST 289.00 Gender and Ethics in Late Medieval France 6 credits

William L North

Acknowledged by contemporaries as one of the leading intellects of her time, Christine de Pizan (ca. 1364-ca. 1431) became an author of unusual literary range, personal resilience, and perceptiveness in a time of ongoing warfare, civil strife, and intellectual ferment. In addition to composing romances, poetry, quasi-autobiographical works, royal biography, and political theory, she became an articulate critic of the patriarchy and misogyny of her world, contemporary patterns and cultures of violence, and a critical voice in defense of female capability. Using Christine's writings together with other contemporary voices, we will examine how contemporaries confronted fundamental questions of identity, status, violence, ethics, and love in domestic and public spheres in late medieval France. 

HIST 360.00 Muslims and Modernity 6 credits

Adeeb Khalid

Through readings in primary sources in translation, we will discuss the major intellectual and cultural movements that have influenced Muslim thinkers from the nineteenth century on. Topics include modernism, nationalism, socialism, and fundamentalism.

Prerequisite: At least one prior course in the history of the Middle East or Central Asia or Islam

Not open to first year students. First year students should register in HIST 267.

JAPN 254.00 World of Japanese Manga in Translation 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 28, Waitlist: 0

Language & Dining Center 104

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 64503

Noboru Tomonari

This course will examine manga (Japanese comic books that first appeared in post-World War II Japan). Manga are avidly read in Japan as a main component of Japanese popular culture. They have a huge influence on other media such as films and anime. The genre has greatly expanded its readership outside of Japan during the last decade. We will read a variety of manga aimed at different gender and age groups, in English translation. The texts will be interpreted as a means of understanding the world-views of the Japanese, and how Japanese society has evolved in recent decades.

In Translation

LCST 101.07 Globalizaton & Local Responses in India Program: Elementary Hindi 3 credits, S/CR/NC only

Open: Size: 20, Registered: 11, Waitlist: 0

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 63902

Brendan P LaRocque

This course will introduce students to the basics of spoken and written Hindi. This will give students an investment in Indian culture and allow them to interact with their surroundings with some degree of familiarity.

Prerequisite: Enrollment in Globalization & Local Responses in India Program

OCS India Program, not open to students who have taken ASST 101

LCST 245.00 The Critical Toolbox: Who's Afraid of Theory? 6 credits

Seth E Peabody

This class introduces students to the various theoretical frameworks and the many approaches scholars can use when analyzing a text (whether this text is a film, an image, a literary piece or a performance). What do words like ‘structuralism,’ ‘ecocriticism,’ 'cultural studies,' and ‘postcolonial studies’ refer to? Most importantly, how do they help us understand the world around us? This class will be organized around interdisciplinary theoretical readings and exercises in cultural analysis.

Prerequisite: At least one 200- or 300-level course in Literary/Artistic Analysis (in any language) or instructor permission

MELA 230.00 Jewish Collective Memory 6 credits

Stacy N Beckwith

Judaism emphasizes transmitting memory from one generation to the next. How have pivotal events and experiences in Jewish history lived on in Jewish collective memory? How do they continue to speak through artistic/literary composition and museum/memorial design? How does Jewish collective memory compare with recorded Jewish history? We will study turning points in Jewish history including the Exodus from Egypt, Jewish expulsion from medieval Spain, the Holocaust, and Israeli independence, as Jews in different times and places have interpreted them with lasting influence. Research includes work with print, film, and other visual/ performative media.

MUSC 188.00 Carleton Chinese Music Ensemble 1 credit, S/CR/NC only

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 10, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center M104

MTWTHF
4:30pm6:00pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 64012

Gao Hong

The ensemble will use indigenous instruments and a Chinese approach to musical training in order to learn and perform music from China. In addition to the Wednesday meeting time, there will be one sectional rehearsal each week.

Prerequisite: Previous experience in a music ensemble, Chinese Musical instruments or instructor permission

MUSC 213.00 J-Pop: Listening to Music in Modern Japan 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 23, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 230

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 65237

Brooke H McCorkle

Japanese popular music encompasses a wide variety of genres, from World War II propaganda tunes to anime soundtracks. But how does this music relate to the history of modern Japan? What is “modern” (or post-modern) about this specific music? This class will examine the creation and consumption of Japanese popular music from around 1945 to present, focusing on how popular music worked in the cultural and political milieu. Through the study of Japanese folk, jazz, rock, hip-hop, bubble gum pop, and film music, students will engage with broader historical trajectories in society. We will discuss music as it relates to issues of race, gender, and pop culture in Japan and around the world.

PHIL 272.00 Early Modern Philosophy: Seventeenth and Eighteenth Century Philosophy 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 18, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 304

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 63953

Hope C Sample

We will read selections of writings from various seventeenth and eighteenth century philosophers on metaphysics, epistemology, and ethics. This course will not be limited to any geographic region, as it is open to philosophical traditions from Europe, the Americas, Africa, and Asia. On the metaphysical side, we will cover topics such as time and space, freedom, and divinity. Ethical issues that we will cover include, but are not limited to, moral responsibility, virtue, suffering, and the good life. Further, we will cover epistemic issues concerning belief, perception, and knowledge. In sum, we will gain a deeper insight into perennial philosophical problems as well as an awareness of the assumptions that drive their solutions, given the author’s personal, social, political, and philosophical context.

PHIL 274.00 Existentialism 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 24, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 426

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 65007

Anna Moltchanova

We will consider the emergence and development of major themes of existentialism in the works of Kierkegaard and Nietzsche, as well as "classical" existentialists such as Heidegger, Sartre and De Beauvoir. We will discuss key issues put forward by the existentialist movement, such as "the question of being" and human historicity, freedom and responsibility and look at how different authors analyzed the nature and ambitions of the Self and diverse aspects of subjectivity.

POSC 120.00 Democracy and Dictatorship 6 credits

Closed: Size: 35, Registered: 34, Waitlist: 4

Anderson Hall 329

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 65110

Juan Diego Prieto

An introduction to the array of different democratic and authoritarian political institutions in both developing and developed countries. We will also explore key issues in contemporary politics in countries around the world, such as nationalism and independence movements, revolution, regime change, state-making, and social movements.

Sophomore Priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: POSC 120.WL0 (Synonym 65111)

POSC 170.00 International Relations and World Politics 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 30, Waitlist: 0

CMC 209

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 65113

Tun Myint

What are the foundational theories and practices of international relations and world politics? This course addresses topics of a geopolitical, commercial and ideological character as they relate to global systems including: great power politics, polycentricity, and international organizations. It also explores the dynamic intersection of world politics with war, terrorism, nuclear weapons, national security, human security, human rights, and the globalization of economic and social development.

POSC 251.00 Modern Political Philosophy: Liberalism and Its Critics 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 11, Waitlist: 0

Laird 205

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 63978

Laurence D Cooper

Liberalism has been the dominant political philosophy of our age, and we who live in a liberal polity have been shaped by it. But liberalism has been, and continues to be, the target of sharp critique. What is liberalism, and what can be said both for and against it? In this course we will examine liberalism’s philosophic roots and engage with some of its most forceful advocates and most profound critics. Readings will be drawn from authors such as Locke, Montesquieu, Rousseau, Marx, Mill, and Tocqueville.

POSC 257.00 Marxist Political Thought 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 17, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 330

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 65601

Paul Petzschmann

A discussion seminar focussed on an in-depth reading of Karl Marx’s “Capital” as well as an exploration of "Marxism after Marx” in the work of Engels, Lenin and Bernstein. The second part of the course will focus on themes raised by Marx in the Political Economy literature today: economic growth and inequality, the role of the state, taxation and redistribution.

POSC 265.00 Public Policy and Global Capitalism 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 23, Waitlist: 0

HASE 105

MTWTHF
8:30am9:40am8:30am9:40am8:30am9:30am
Synonym: 65128

Alfred P Montero

This course provides a comprehensive introduction to comparative and international public policy. It examines major theories and approaches to public policy design and implementation in several major areas: international policy economy (including the study of international trade and monetary policy, financial regulation, and comparative welfare policy), global public health and comparative healthcare policy, institutional development (including democratic governance, accountability systems, and judicial reform), and environmental public policy.

Prerequisite: Statistics 120 (formerly Mathematics 215) strongly recommended, or instructor permission

POSC 282.00 Terrorism and Counterterrorism 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 22, Waitlist: 0

HASE 105

MTWTHF
8:15am10:00am8:15am10:00am
Synonym: 65555

Jon R Olson

This course focuses on the historic and modern use of violence or the threat of violence by non-state actors to secure political outcomes. We will review the strategy and tactics of various terror groups, use case studies to understand the logic of terrorism, assess why some groups succeed while others fail, and study terrorist organizations’ efforts at recruitment and indoctrination. These topics will be addressed from theoretical and practical perspectives, with input from expert guest speakers. Finally, we will assess counterterrorism measures, including the moral, ethical, legal, and practical approaches to creating security in the modern world.

POSC 283.00 Separatist Movements 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 25, Waitlist: 0

HASE 105

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 65133

Dev Gupta

This course explores the emergence and resolution of separatist movements around the world. While separatist movements are often associated with the violent dissolution of states, not all separatist movements result in violence and not all separatist movements seek independence. We will investigate the conditions under which separatist pressures are most likely to develop and when such pressures result in actual separation. We will contrast the tactics of movements, from peaceful approaches in places like contemporary Quebec or Scotland, to peaceful outcomes like the "velvet divorce" of Czechoslovakia, to violent insurrections in places like the Philippines, Spain, and Northern Ireland.

POSC 335.00 Navigating Environmental Complexity—Challenges to Democratic Governance and Political Communication 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 12, Waitlist: 0

HASE 109

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 65470

Barbara Allen

How can we design democratic institutions to deal with environmental and social problems? Are there universal approaches to solving political problems in physically and socially diverse communities? Do people come up with different institutional ways to address shared problems because of environmental or cultural differences? Our seminar considers current thinking about complex social-ecological systems and how we communicate and work collectively to address the problems of local and global commons.  

POSC 348.00 Strangers, Foreigners and Exiles* 6 credits

Mihaela Czobor-Lupp

The course explores the role that strangers play in human life, the challenges that foreigners create for democratic politics, the promises they bring to it, as well as the role of exiles in improving the cultural capacity of societies to live with difference. We will read texts by Arendt, Kafka, Derrida, Sophocles, Said, Joseph Conrad, Tzvetan Todorov, and Julia Kristeva. Special attention will be given to the plight of Roma in Europe, as a typical case of strangers that are still perceived nowadays as a menace to the modern sedentary civilization.

POSC 361.00 Approaches to Development* 6 credits

Tun Myint

The meaning of "development" has been contested across multiple disciplines. The development and continual existence of past civilizations has been at the core of the discourse among those who study factors leading to the rise and fall of civilizations. Can we reconcile the meaning of development in economic terms with cultural, ecological, political, religious, social and spiritual terms? How can we measure it quantitatively? What and how do the UNDP Human Development Indexes and the World Development Reports measure? What are the exemplary cases that illustrate development? How do individual choices and patterns of livelihood activities link to development trends?

Extra Time Required

POSC 372.00 Mansions and Shantytowns: Politics of the Spaces We Live In* 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 14, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 230

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 65117

Huan Gao

This course explores theories about spaces/places and investigates the impact of our physical environment on a broad range of social and political issues. We will look at how parks, monuments, residential communities, and other features of our cities and towns are made, who makes them, and in turn, their effects on our daily lives. Students will engage with important contemporary issues such as residential segregation, public space management, protest policing, etc. Most of the course will focus on urban politics, with a brief foray into rural issues. The goal of this course is to encourage students to think about everyday environmental features in a more systematic and theoretic manner and design social scientific inquiries into spatial issues.

RELG 153.00 Introduction to Buddhism 6 credits

Jonathan H Dickstein

This course offers a survey of Buddhism from its inception in India some 2500 years ago to the present. We first address fundamental Buddhist ideas and practices, then their elaboration in the Mahayana and tantric movements, which emerged in the first millennium CE in India. We also consider the diffusion of Buddhism throughout Asia and to the West. Attention will be given to both continuity and diversity within Buddhism--to its commonalities and transformations in specific historical and cultural settings. We also will address philosophical, social, political, and ethical problems that are debated among Buddhists and scholars of Buddhism today.

RELG 257.00 Asian Religions and Ecology 6 credits

Jonathan H Dickstein

How “eco-friendly” are Asian religious traditions? What does “eco-friendly” even mean? This course begins with an overview of the major religious traditions of South, Southeast, Central, and East Asia. From this foundation, we turn to modern and contemporary ecological thinkers, movements, and policies and discuss their indebtedness to, and divergence from, various religious heritages. We will also explore how modernity, capitalism, industrialization, climate collapse, and Western environmental movements have influenced eco-advocacy in contemporary Asia.

RUSS 205.00 Russian in Cultural Contexts 6 credits

Open: Size: 20, Registered: 8, Waitlist: 0

Language & Dining Center 302

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 65059

Anna M Dotlibova

In this course students continue to develop skills of narration, listening comprehension, and writing, while exploring issues of contemporary Russian life and consciousness. The issues are examined from the position of two cultures: American and Russian. The course draws on a variety of sources for reading and viewing, including the periodic press, film, and music.

Prerequisite: Russian 204 or equivalent

RUSS 237.00 Beyond Beef Stroganoff: Food in Russian Culture 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 12, Waitlist: 0

Language & Dining Center 330

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 65064

Laura Goering

How did the Russian peasant stove shape culinary culture? Why did Catherine the Great force her subjects to cultivate potatoes? How did the October Revolution change the way Soviet citizens ate? In this course we will study key aspects of Russian history and culture through the lens of culinary history. Topics will include: food and fasting in Russian Orthodoxy; food, class and power under the tsars; high Russian (or is it French?) culture of the nineteenth century; Soviet policies for feeding the worker; non-Russian cuisines in the Soviet Union; drinking culture and anti-alcohol campaigns; food and nationalism in the twenty-first century. Includes hands-on sessions on Russian food preparation. In English.

In translation

RUSS 239.00 The Warped Soul of Putin's Russia 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 8, Waitlist: 0

Language & Dining Center 242

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 65885

Victoria Y Thorstensson

What is Russia’s problem? Why is the country famous for its great “soul” and culture waging a bloody war and becoming increasingly anti-Western? This course explores the cultural mythology that characterizes the state of contemporary Russian society and its “soul,” using critical approaches from trauma and memory studies, as well as theories of ressentiment and nostalgia. Authors to be studied include ideologues of Putin’s Russia (Surkov, Prilepin), its critics (Sorokin), and other writers, artists, and filmmakers who reflect, define, question, and challenge the direction in which country is moving and give it a cultural diagnosis. In English.

In translation

RUSS 332.00 Chekhov in Film, Film in Chekhov 3 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 7, Waitlist: 0

Language & Dining Center 243

MTWTHF
3:10pm4:55pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 63945

Anna M Dotlibova

Chekhov’s literary oeuvre appeared at the same moment as the birth of cinematography, and the two are closely intertwined. His art rests on what Sergei Eisenstein called the central principle of film: montage, visuality, the constant changing of shots, and dislocation in time and space. It is no wonder that Chekhov’s stories were adapted for the screen in record numbers: to date we count 235 film adapatations plus 10 animated films. In this course we will read several of his best short stories, view films based on his works, and analyze the cinematographic qualities of Chekhov’s prose.

Prerequisite: Russian 205 (previous or concurrent) or instructor's permission

SOAN 110.00 Introduction to Anthropology 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 28, Waitlist: 2

Leighton 305

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 64852

Colin McLaughlin-Alcock

Anthropology is the study of all human beings in all their diversity, an exploration of what it means to be human throughout the globe. This course helps us to see ourselves, and others, from a new perspective. By examining specific analytic concepts—such as culture—and research methods—such as participant observation—we learn how anthropologists seek to understand, document, and explain the stunning variety of human cultures and ways of organizing society. This course encourages you to consider how looking behind cultural assumptions helps anthropologists solve real world dilemmas.

Sophomore Priority.

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: SOAN 110.WL0 (Synonym 64853)

SOAN 228.00 Public Sociology of Religion 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 11, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 202

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 64867

Wes D Markofski

This course focuses on special topics in the public sociology of religion.  We will look at the intersection of race, religion, and politics in the U.S.; the intersection of science and religion in Indigenous-led environmental movements; and varieties of public religion around the world—including Islamic feminism and democracy in Egypt and Indonesia, Coptic Christianity and the Muslim Brotherhood, orthodox Jewish movements in Israel, American evangelicals in the U.S., and Black church mobilization in the U.S. civil rights movement.  As we do so, we will examine core theoretical perspectives and empirical developments in the contemporary sociology of religion.     

Prerequisite: The department recommends that Sociology/Anthropology 110 or 111 be taken prior to enrolling in courses number 200 or above

SOAN 233.00 Anthropology of Food 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 25, Waitlist: 11

Leighton 236

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 64856

Constanza C Ocampo-Raeder

Food is the way to a person's heart but perhaps even more interesting, the window into a society's soul. Simply speaking understating a society's foodways is the best way to comprehend the complexity between people, culture and nature. This course explores how anthropologists use food to understand different aspects of human behavior, from food procurement and consumption practices to the politics of nutrition and diets. In doing so we hope to elucidate how food is more than mere sustenance and that often the act of eating is a manifestation of power, resistance, identity, and community.

Sophomore priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: SOAN 233.WL0 (Synonym 64857)

SOAN 256.00 Africa: Representation and Conflict 6 credits

Pamela Feldman-Savelsberg

Pairing classics in Africanist anthropology with contemporary re-studies, we explore changes in African societies and in the questions anthropologists have posed about them. We address issues of representation and self-presentation in written ethnographies as well as in African portrait photography. We then turn from the visual to the invisible realm of African witchcraft. Initiation rituals, war, and migration place selfhood and belonging back in this-world contexts. In-depth case studies include, among others: the Cameroon Grassfields, the Bemba of Zambia, and the Nuer of South Sudan.

Prerequisite: The department strongly recommends that Sociology/Anthropology 110 or 111 be taken prior to enrolling in courses numbered 200 or above

SOAN 257.07 Culture and Politics in India 6 credits

Meera Sehgal

India is a region of immense diversity where more than one billion people live. We will explore social structures in India--through a focus on key areas of everyday life such as family, religion, economy, systems of stratification and social movements. Close attention will be given to religious nationalism, globalization and militarism as dominant trends affecting contemporary India. We will consider: How has India been represented in the Western imagination and why do such representations matter? What are the forces of modernity and tradition in India? What are the similarities and differences in systems of stratification in India and the United States?

Requires participation in OCS India Program

SOAN 262.00 Anthropology of Health and Illness 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 14, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 236

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 64858

Pamela Feldman-Savelsberg

An ethnographic approach to beliefs and practices regarding health and illness in numerous societies worldwide. This course examines patients, practitioners, and the social networks and contexts through which therapies are managed to better understand medical systems as well as the significance of the anthropological study of misfortune. Specific topics include the symbolism of models of illness, the ritual management of misfortune and of life crisis events, the political economy of health, therapy management, medical pluralism, and cross-cultural medical ethics.

Prerequisite: The department strongly recommends that Sociology/Anthropology 110 or 111 be taken prior to enrolling in courses numbered 200 or above

SOAN 331.00 Anthropological Thought and Theory 6 credits

Closed: Size: 15, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 6

Leighton 236

MTWTHF
8:15am10:00am8:15am10:00am
Synonym: 64861

Constanza C Ocampo-Raeder

Our ways of perceiving and acting in the world emerge simultaneously from learned and shared orientations of long duration, and from specific contexts and contingencies of the moment. This applies to the production of anthropological ideas and of anthropology as an academic discipline. This course examines anthropological theory by placing the observers and the observed in the same comparative historical framework, subject to the ethnographic process and to historical conditions in and out of academe. We seek to understand genealogies of ideas, building on and/or reacting to previous anthropological approaches. We highlight the diversity of voices who thought up these ideas, and have influenced anthropological thought through time. We attend to the intellectual and political context in which anthropologists conducted research, wrote, and published their works, as well as which voices did/did not reach academic audiences. The course thus traces the development of the core issues, central debates, internecine battles, and diversity of anthropological thought and of anthropologists that have animated anthropology since it first emerged as a distinct field of inquiry to present-day efforts at intellectual decolonization. 

Prerequisite: Socilogy/Anthropology 110 or 111, and at least one 200- or 300-level SOAN course, or permission of instructor.

SPAN 205.01 Conversation and Composition 6 credits

Closed: Size: 20, Registered: 18, Waitlist: 2

Language & Dining Center 242

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 64979

Humberto R Huergo

A course designed to develop the student's oral and written mastery of Spanish. Advanced study of grammar. Compositions and conversations based on cultural and literary topics. There is also an audio-video component focused on current affairs.

Prerequisite: Spanish 204 or equivalent

SPAN 208.00 Coffee and News 2 credits, S/CR/NC only

Closed: Size: 10, Registered: 9, Waitlist: 8

Willis 114

MTWTHF
1:10pm2:10pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 64980

Silvia López

An excellent opportunity to brush up your Spanish while learning about current issues in Spain and Latin America. The class meets only once a week for an hour. Class requirements include reading specific sections of Spain's leading newspaper, El País, everyday on the internet (El País), and then meeting once a week to exchange ideas over coffee with a small group of students like yourself.

Prerequisite: Spanish 204 or equivalent

SPAN 242.00 Introduction to Latin American Literature 6 credits

Silvia López

An introductory course to reading major texts in Spanish provides an historical survey of the literary movements within Latin American literature from the pre-Hispanic to the contemporary period. Recommended as a foundation course for further study. Not open to seniors.

Prerequisite: Spanish 204 or proficiency

Not open to seniors

SPAN 345.00 Culture, Capitalism and the Commons 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 19, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 235

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 64986

Palmar Álvarez-Blanco

Have you ever wondered if not capitalism, then what? In this course we will critically approach the historical background, the causes and, most importantly, the consequences of the civil and ecological crisis unleashed globally in 2008. Both in its origin and its consequences, this crisis went beyond the financial field, extending into the realms of politics, economics, culture, media and ecology. In light of this context, we will take a transdisciplinary approach to the study of capitalist culture and analyze the main changes that have developed from the cycle of social mobilizations surrounding the "indignados" movement or Spanish 15M in 2011. With a primary focus on Spain, we will concentrate on analyzing cultural artifacts that mark a paradigm shift from a capitalist culture towards the development of a culture of the commons that seeks to improve the living conditions of the social majority, defending both human rights and ecological justice.

Prerequisite: Spanish 205 or equivalent

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