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Your search for courses for 23/WI and with Curricular Exploration: HI found 48 courses.

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AMST 115.00 Introduction to American Studies 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 24, Waitlist: 6

Leighton 402

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 64034

Christopher M Elias

This overview of the "interdisciplinary discipline" of American Studies will focus on the ways American Studies engages with and departs from other scholarly fields of inquiry. We will study the stories of those who have been marginalized in the social, political, cultural, and economic life of the United States due to their class, race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, religion, citizenship, and level of ability. We will explore contemporary American Studies concerns like racial and class formation, the production of space and place, the consumption and circulation of culture, and transnational histories.

Sophomore Priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: AMST 115.WL0 (Synonym 64035)

AMST 238.00 9/11 and the War on Terror in American Culture 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 25, Waitlist: 2

Willis 203

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 65830

Christopher M Elias

An exploration of how the terrorist attacks of 9/11/2001 and the subsequent War on Terror impacted American culture. We will focus on issues of both form (the elements determining the look and feel of post-9/11 artwork) and content (the social and moral concerns driving post-9/11 culture). Shared texts will include novels, short stories, poetry, music, art, and films. Particular attention will be paid to themes such as race and racism, religion and religious discrimination, immigration and xenophobia, debates over American exceptionalism, critiques of American capitalism, the "death of irony," attempts to define "truth," and the spread of conspiracy theories. 

ASST 130.07 Globalization & Local Responses in India Program: Tourism and Development in India 3 credits, S/CR/NC only

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 11, Waitlist: 0

Synonym: 63901

Brendan P LaRocque

This course will examine concepts and practices regarding socio-economic development in India, with a special focus on the role of tourism as part of the process of globalization. We will study the scholarly writings and debates around the varied agendas and ideologies concerning development, and analyze the different approaches to economic growth that have historically been dominant in India. As part of our learning process, we will visit numerous sites wherein economic development is being undertaken, including urban and rural locales as well as tourist and pilgrimage sites. This course will include scholarly readings, instructor and guest lectures, and require student presentations of their work.

OCS India Program

CCST 208.00 International Coffee and News 2 credits, S/CR/NC only

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 202

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm
Synonym: 65067

David G Tompkins

Have you just returned from Asia, Africa, Europe, or South America? This course is an excellent way to keep in touch with the culture (and, when appropriate, the language) you left behind. Relying on magazines and newspapers around the world, students will discuss common topics and themes representing a wide array of regions. You may choose to read the press in the local language, or read English-language media about your region, meeting once each week for conversational exchange. (Language of conversation is English.)

Prerequisite: Students must have participated in an off-campus study program (Carleton or non-Carleton) or instructor permission

CCST 398.00 The Cross-Cultural Panorama: A Capstone Workshop 2 credits, S/CR/NC only

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 12, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 202

MTWTHF
3:10pm4:20pm
Synonym: 65070

David G Tompkins, Paul Petzschmann

The work of Cross-Cultural Studies traverses many disciplines, often engaging with experiences that are difficult to capture in traditional formats. In this course students will create an ePortfolio that reflects, deepens, and narrates the various forms of cross-cultural experience they have had at Carleton, drawing on coursework and off-campus study, as well as such extra-curricular activities as talks, service learning, internships and fellowships. Guided by readings and prompts, students will write a reflective essay articulating the coherence of the parts, describing both the process and the results of their pathway through the minor. Considered a capstone for CCST, but for anyone looking to thread together their experiences across culture. Course is taught as a workshop. 

CGSC 330.00 Embodied Cognition 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 11, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 036

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 65657

Jonathan R McKinney

This seminar will consider recent work in philosophy, cognitive science and linguistics critical of views of human cognition as "disembodied" and Cartesian. Philosophical sources of the early critiques of symbolic AI and "cartesianism" will be considered (Merleau-Ponty, Dewey), as will the enactive (Cuffari, Di Paolo, and De Jaegher) and ecological (Chemero, Cowley, Steffensen) critiques of language, and current work on embodied cognition by Eleanor Rosch, Hubert Dreyfus, John Haugeland, Andy Clark and Evan Thompson. The seminar will include materials relevant to students in philosophy, linguistics, psychology and cognitive science.

Prerequisite: Cognitive Science 130, or Cognitive Science/Psychology 232 or permission of the instructor.

CLAS 240.00 Rome: From Village to Superpower 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 24, Waitlist: 5

Language & Dining Center 104

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 64403

Jake N Morton

This class will investigate how Rome rose from a humble village of outcasts and refugees to become the preeminent power in the entire Mediterranean. We will trace Rome's political evolution from kings to the Republic, alongside their gradual takeover of the Italian peninsula. We will study how Rome then swiftly overpowered what had been the most powerful kingdoms in the Mediterranean and established themselves as dominant. Who were these Romans and what were their political, military, religious, and social systems that enabled them to accomplish so much? What critical events shaped their development and ultimately led to total political control of the Mediterranean world?

DGAH 110.00 Hacking the Humanities 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 32, Waitlist: 1

CMC 110

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 64408

Austin P Mason

The digital world is infiltrating the academy and profoundly disrupting the arts and humanities, posing fundamental challenges to traditional models of university education, scholarly research, academic publication and creative production. This core course for the Digital Arts & Humanities minor introduces the key concepts, debates and technologies that shape DGAH, including text encoding, digital mapping (GIS), network analysis, data visualization, 3D imaging and basic programming languages. Students will learn to hack the humanities by making a collaborative, publishable DH project, while acquiring the skills and confidence necessary to actively participate in the digital world, both in college and beyond.

ENTS 215.00 Environmental Ethics 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 24, Waitlist: 2

Weitz Center 230

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 65800

Colleen M Carpenter

This course is an introduction to the central ethical debates in environmental policy and practice, as well as some of the major traditions of environmental thought. It investigates such questions as whether we can have moral duties towards animals, ecosystems, or future generations; what is the ethical basis for wilderness preservation; and what is the relationship between environmentalism and social justice.

EUST 110.00 The Power of Place: Memory and Counter-Memory in the European City 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 16, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 305

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 64322

Paul Petzschmann, Baird E Jarman, Mihaela Czobor-Lupp,

This team-taught interdisciplinary course explores the relationship between memory, place and power in Europe’s cities. It examines the practices through which individuals and groups imagine, negotiate and contest their past in public spaces through art, literature, film and architecture. The instructors will draw on their research and teaching experience in urban centers of Europe after a thorough introduction to the study of memory across different disciplines. Students will be challenged to think critically about larger questions regarding the possibility of national and local memories as the foundation of identity and pride but also of guilt and shame. 

FREN 210.00 Coffee and News 2 credits, S/CR/NC only

Closed: Size: 15, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 1

Language & Dining Center 335

MTWTHF
3:10pm4:20pm
Synonym: 64766

Cathy Yandell

Keep up your French while learning about current issues in France, as well as world issues from a French perspective. Class meets once a week for an hour. Requirements include reading specific sections of leading French newspapers, (Le Monde, Libération, etc.) on the internet, and then meeting once a week to exchange ideas over coffee with a small group of students.

Prerequisite: French 204 or instructor approval

Sophomore Priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: FREN 210.WL0 (Synonym 64767)

GWSS 398.00 Capstone: Race, Gender, and Sexuality in Popular Culture 6 credits

Candace I Moore

This capstone seminar reads representations of racial, gender, and sexual minorities in popular culture through the lenses of feminist, critical race, queer, and trans theories. Kimberlé Crenshaw coined the term “intersectionality” in the late 1980s to describe an approach to oppression that considered how structures of power act multiply on individuals based upon their interlocking racial, class, gender, sexual, and other identities. This seminar takes up the charge of intersectional analysis—rejecting essentialist theories of difference while exploring pluralities—to interpret diversity (or lack thereof) in forms of art and entertainment, focusing on film, TV, and digital media.

Prerequisite: Gender, Women's & Sexuality Studies 110 or 212 or Cinema and Media Studies 110 or Women's and Gender Studies 110 or 112 or instructor consent

HIST 111.00 Uncharted Waters: The History of Society and the Sea 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 29, Waitlist: 6

Leighton 304

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 63964

Antony E Adler

This course introduces students to maritime history, marine environmental history, and issues in contemporary marine policy. While traditional histories have framed the sea as an empty space and obstacle to be traversed, or as a battleground, we will approach the ocean as a contact zone, a space of labor, and as the site of focused scientific research, thereby emphasizing human interaction with the oceans. We will examine how people have come to know, utilize, and govern the world’s oceans across time and space, and we will explore how this history informs contemporary issues in maritime law, governance, and ocean conservation.

HIST 125.00 African American History I: From Africa to the Civil War 6 credits

Rebecca J Brueckmann

This course is a survey of early African American history. It will introduce students to major themes and events while also covering historical interpretations and debates in the field. Core themes of the course include migration, conflict, and culture. Beginning with autonomous African politics, the course traces the development of the United States through the experiences of enslaved and free African American women and men to the Civil War. The main aim of the course is for students to become familiar with key issues and developments in African American history and their centrality to understanding U.S. history.

HIST 151.00 History of Modern Japan 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 17, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 402

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 65031

Seungjoo Yoon

This course explores the modern transformation of Japanese society, politics, economy and culture from the Meiji Restoration of 1868 to the present. It is designed to provide students with an opportunity to explore basic issues and problems relating to modern Japanese history and international relations. Topics include the intellectual crisis of the late Tokugawa period, the Meiji Constitution, the development of an interior democracy, class and gender, the rise of Japanese fascism, the Pacific War, and postwar developments.

HIST 170.00 Modern Latin America 1810-Present 6 credits

Pedro F Quijada

Modern Latin American history is marked by both violent divisions and creative cooperation, nationalist proclamations and imperialist incursions, and democratic pursuits and dictatorial repression. This course offers a survey of this complex regional history from independence movements at the beginning of the nineteenth century through globalization in the twenty-first century. It addresses methodological issues that include the significance of multiple historical perspectives and the interpretation of sources. It considers the relationship between individuals and larger social contexts with an emphasis on race, ethnicity, class, citizenship status, and gender. It places Latin American culture and politics in regional and global contexts. 

HIST 205.00 American Environmental History 6 credits

George H Vrtis

Environmental concerns, conflicts, and change mark the course of American history, from the distant colonial past to our own day. This course will consider the nature of these eco-cultural developments, focusing on the complicated ways that human thought and perception, culture and society, and natural processes and biota have all combined to forge Americans' changing relationship with the natural world. Topics will include Native American subsistence strategies, Euroamerican settlement, industrialization, urbanization, consumption, and the environmental movement. As we explore these issues, one of our overarching goals will be to develop an historical context for thinking deeply about contemporary environmental dilemmas.

HIST 212.00 The Era of the American Revolution 6 credits

Serena R Zabin

How Revolutionary was the American Revolution? This class will examine the American Revolution as both a process and a phenomenon. For whom, for what, and how was the United States created? We will consider the relationship of the American Revolution to social, cultural, economic, political, and ideological change in the lives of Americans from the founding fathers to the disenfranchised, focusing on the period 1750-1790. 

HIST 220.00 From Blackface to Blaxploitation: Black History and/in Film 6 credits

Rebecca J Brueckmann

This course focuses on the representation of African American history in popular US-American movies. It will introduce students to the field of visual history, using cinema as a primary source. Through films from the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, the seminar will analyze African American history, (pop-)cultural depictions, and memory culture. We will discuss subjects, narrative arcs, stylistic choices, production design, performative and film industry practices, and historical receptions of movies. The topics include slavery, racial segregation and white supremacy, the Black Freedom Movement, controversies and conflicts in Black communities, Black LGBTQIA+ history, ghettoization and police brutality, Black feminism, and Afrofuturism.

HIST 231.00 Mapping the World Before Mercator 6 credits

Victoria Morse

This course will explore early maps primarily in medieval and early modern Europe. After an introduction to the rhetoric of maps and world cartography, we will examine the functions and forms of medieval European and Islamic maps and then look closely at the continuities and transformations in map-making during the period of European exploration. The focus of the course will be on understanding each map within its own cultural context and how maps can be used to answer historical questions. We will work closely with the maps in Gould Library Special Collections to expand campus awareness of the collection.

Extra time is required for a one-time map show in the library during 6a which we will schedule at the beginning of term.

HIST 250.00 Modern Germany 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 8, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 426

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 65034

David G Tompkins

This course offers a comprehensive examination of German history in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. We will look at the German-speaking peoples of Central Europe through the prism of politics, society, culture, and the economy. Through a range of readings, we will grapple with the many complex and contentious issues that have made German history such an interesting area of intellectual inquiry.

HIST 258.00 Korean History in Films & Testimonies 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 7, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 301

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 65482

Seungjoo Yoon

What are the limits and promises of putting history on screen, and vice versa? What would be a better way to convey the sentiments of a human being who must make a moral choice in a distinctive historical circumstance? This course explores the dynamic relationship between testimony-giving and filmmaking about the lived experience in Korea in the recent past. We will focus on the voices of ordinary people, especially those shaped by female and downtrodden citizens. Drawing examples from films, diaries, memoirs, autobiographies, eyewitnesses, and/or novels, students will analyze an enduring value orientation of a historical figure of their choice.

Extra Time Required

HIST 267.00 Muslims and Modernity 6 credits

Adeeb Khalid

Through readings in primary sources in translation, we will discuss the major intellectual and cultural movements that have influenced Muslim thinkers from the nineteenth century on. Topics include modernism, nationalism, socialism, and fundamentalism.

Through readings in primary sources in translation, we will discuss the major intellectual and cultural movements that have influenced Muslim thinkers from the nineteenth century on. Topics include modernism, nationalism, socialism, and fundamentalism.

HIST 268.07 Globalization & Local Responses in India Program: History, Globalization, and Politics in Modern India 6 credits

Open: Size: 20, Registered: 11, Waitlist: 0

Synonym: 63900

Brendan P LaRocque

Indian democracy presents a complicated social and political terrain that is being reshaped and remapped by a wide variety of efforts to bring about economic development, social change, political representation, justice, and equality. In this course we will examine, among other topics, the history of modern India with a focus on political movements centered on issues of colonialism, nationalism, class, gender, and caste. We will also examine changes in contemporary India brought about by globalization, and study how particular groups and communities have reacted and adapted to these developments.

Prerequisite: Acceptance into the India OCS Program required

OCS India Program

HIST 279.00 Central American Revolutions 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 14, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 202

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 65712

Pedro F Quijada

Throughout the 1970s and 1980s, civil war and political violence swept the Central American isthmus. The impact of these conflicts is still felt in the region as well as in the United States. This course examines the regional as well as the international factors that contributed to the rise of these armed conflicts. Through the examination of print and audio-visual primary sources as well as scholarship students will learn about the origins, development, and legacies of these revolutions. We will examine the colonial legacies, capitalist development, ethnic and racial conflict, foreign intervention, civil wars, and, finally, the consequential waves of migration to the U.S. and to other parts of the world.

HIST 289.00 Gender and Ethics in Late Medieval France 6 credits

William L North

Acknowledged by contemporaries as one of the leading intellects of her time, Christine de Pizan (ca. 1364-ca. 1431) became an author of unusual literary range, personal resilience, and perceptiveness in a time of ongoing warfare, civil strife, and intellectual ferment. In addition to composing romances, poetry, quasi-autobiographical works, royal biography, and political theory, she became an articulate critic of the patriarchy and misogyny of her world, contemporary patterns and cultures of violence, and a critical voice in defense of female capability. Using Christine's writings together with other contemporary voices, we will examine how contemporaries confronted fundamental questions of identity, status, violence, ethics, and love in domestic and public spheres in late medieval France. 

HIST 298.00 Junior Colloquium 6 credits

Open: Size: 18, Registered: 12, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 301

MTWTHF
3:10pm4:55pm3:10pm4:55pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 65035

Adeeb Khalid

In the junior year, majors must take this six-credit reading and discussion course taught each year by different members of the department faculty. The course is also required for the History minor. The general purpose of History 298 is to help students reach a more sophisticated understanding of the nature of history as a discipline and of the approaches and methods of historians. A major who is considering off-campus study in the junior year should consult with their adviser on when to take History 298.

Prerequisite: At least two six credit courses in History (excluding HIST 100 and Independents) at Carleton.

Required for History majors and minors

HIST 308.00 American Cities and Nature 6 credits

George H Vrtis

Since the nation's founding, the percentage of Americans living in cities has risen nearly sixteenfold, from about five percent to the current eighty-one percent. This massive change has spawned legions of others, and all of them have bearing on the complex ways that American cities and city-dwellers have shaped and reshaped the natural world. This course will consider the nature of cities in American history, giving particular attention to the dynamic linkages binding these cultural epicenters to ecological communities, environmental forces and resource flows, to eco-politics and social values, and to those seemingly far-away places we call farms and wilderness. 

Prerequisite: History 205 is recommended but not required

HIST 360.00 Muslims and Modernity 6 credits

Adeeb Khalid

Through readings in primary sources in translation, we will discuss the major intellectual and cultural movements that have influenced Muslim thinkers from the nineteenth century on. Topics include modernism, nationalism, socialism, and fundamentalism.

Prerequisite: At least one prior course in the history of the Middle East or Central Asia or Islam

Not open to first year students. First year students should register in HIST 267.

HIST 398.00 Advanced Historical Writing 6 credits, S/CR/NC only

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 13, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 202

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 65038

Annette R Igra

This course is designed to support majors in developing advanced skills in historical research and writing. Through a combination of class discussion, small group work, and one-on-one interactions with the professor, majors learn the process of constructing sophisticated, well-documented, and well-written historical arguments within the context of an extended project of their own design. They also learn and practice strategies for engaging critically with contemporary scholarship and effective techniques of peer review and the oral presentation of research. Concurrent enrollment in History 400 required. By permission of the instructor only.

HIST 400 required.

IDSC 251.01 Windows on the Good Life 2 credits, S/CR/NC only

Closed: Size: 18, Registered: 16, Waitlist: 6

HASE 109

MTWTHF
8:00pm9:45pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 65418

Laurence D Cooper, Alan Rubenstein

Human beings are always and everywhere challenged by the question: What should I do to spend my mortal time well? One way to approach this ultimate challenge is to explore some of the great cultural products of our civilization--works that are a delight to read for their wisdom and artfulness. This series of two-credit courses will explore a philosophical dialogue of Plato in the fall, a work from the Bible in the winter, and a pair of plays by Shakespeare in the spring. The course can be repeated for credit throughout the year and in subsequent years.

IDSC 251.02 Windows on the Good Life 2 credits, S/CR/NC only

Closed: Size: 18, Registered: 16, Waitlist: 10

HASE 109

MTWTHF
3:10pm4:45pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 65419

Laurence D Cooper, Alan Rubenstein

Human beings are always and everywhere challenged by the question: What should I do to spend my mortal time well? One way to approach this ultimate challenge is to explore some of the great cultural products of our civilization--works that are a delight to read for their wisdom and artfulness. This series of two-credit courses will explore a philosophical dialogue of Plato in the fall, a work from the Bible in the winter, and a pair of plays by Shakespeare in the spring. The course can be repeated for credit throughout the year and in subsequent years.

MELA 230.00 Jewish Collective Memory 6 credits

Stacy N Beckwith

Judaism emphasizes transmitting memory from one generation to the next. How have pivotal events and experiences in Jewish history lived on in Jewish collective memory? How do they continue to speak through artistic/literary composition and museum/memorial design? How does Jewish collective memory compare with recorded Jewish history? We will study turning points in Jewish history including the Exodus from Egypt, Jewish expulsion from medieval Spain, the Holocaust, and Israeli independence, as Jews in different times and places have interpreted them with lasting influence. Research includes work with print, film, and other visual/ performative media.

PHIL 119.00 Meaning of Life 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 30, Waitlist: 1

Leighton 304

MTWTHF
3:10pm4:55pm3:10pm4:55pm
Synonym: 63952

Hope C Sample

Does life have a meaning? To answer this, we will first inquire into more basic questions about agency that provide a foundation for our topic: Is everything fated? Is fate compatible with free will? Can we always do the right thing without moral remainder, or are there genuine moral dilemmas? Are there grey zones of compromised responsibility due to structures of oppression, or other factors? How do we know what lives are meaningful for us? Is there any objective truth about the meaning of life? After developing your ideas on the answers to those questions, we will turn to various approaches to meaning in life, both those that affirm meaning and deny it. We will cover, for example, approaches to the meaning of life grounded in narrative, divinity, creativity, and more.

PHIL 211.00 Being, Time and Identity 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 8, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 303

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 65006

Anna Moltchanova

The aim of metaphysics has traditionally been to identify the nature and structure of reality. The topics of this course are the topology of time, identity of things and individuals, causality, free will, and the referents of general terms. We will read a variety of classic and contemporary texts, which are organized topically.

Prerequisite: 100-level Philosophy course or instructor permission

PHIL 272.00 Early Modern Philosophy: Seventeenth and Eighteenth Century Philosophy 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 18, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 304

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 63953

Hope C Sample

We will read selections of writings from various seventeenth and eighteenth century philosophers on metaphysics, epistemology, and ethics. This course will not be limited to any geographic region, as it is open to philosophical traditions from Europe, the Americas, Africa, and Asia. On the metaphysical side, we will cover topics such as time and space, freedom, and divinity. Ethical issues that we will cover include, but are not limited to, moral responsibility, virtue, suffering, and the good life. Further, we will cover epistemic issues concerning belief, perception, and knowledge. In sum, we will gain a deeper insight into perennial philosophical problems as well as an awareness of the assumptions that drive their solutions, given the author’s personal, social, political, and philosophical context.

PHIL 274.00 Existentialism 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 24, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 426

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 65007

Anna Moltchanova

We will consider the emergence and development of major themes of existentialism in the works of Kierkegaard and Nietzsche, as well as "classical" existentialists such as Heidegger, Sartre and De Beauvoir. We will discuss key issues put forward by the existentialist movement, such as "the question of being" and human historicity, freedom and responsibility and look at how different authors analyzed the nature and ambitions of the Self and diverse aspects of subjectivity.

POSC 251.00 Modern Political Philosophy: Liberalism and Its Critics 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 11, Waitlist: 0

Laird 205

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 63978

Laurence D Cooper

Liberalism has been the dominant political philosophy of our age, and we who live in a liberal polity have been shaped by it. But liberalism has been, and continues to be, the target of sharp critique. What is liberalism, and what can be said both for and against it? In this course we will examine liberalism’s philosophic roots and engage with some of its most forceful advocates and most profound critics. Readings will be drawn from authors such as Locke, Montesquieu, Rousseau, Marx, Mill, and Tocqueville.

RELG 110.00 Understanding Religion 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 23, Waitlist: 1

Leighton 330

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 65346

Sonja G Anderson

How can we best understand the role of religion in the world today, and how should we interpret the meaning of religious traditions--their texts and practices--in history and culture? This class takes an exciting tour through selected themes and puzzles related to the fascinating and diverse expressions of religion throughout the world. From politics and pop culture, to religious philosophies and spiritual practices, to rituals, scriptures, gender, religious authority, and more, students will explore how these issues emerge in a variety of religions, places, and historical moments in the U.S. and across the globe.

RELG 130.00 Native American Religions 6 credits

Michael D McNally

This course explores the history and contemporary practice of Native American religious traditions, especially as they have developed amid colonization and resistance. While surveying a broad variety of ways that Native American traditions imagine land, community, and the sacred, the course focuses on the local traditions of the Ojibwe and Lakota communities. Materials include traditional beliefs and practices, the history of missions, intertribal new religious movements, and contemporary issues of treaty rights, religious freedom, and the revitalization of language and culture.

RELG 153.00 Introduction to Buddhism 6 credits

Jonathan H Dickstein

This course offers a survey of Buddhism from its inception in India some 2500 years ago to the present. We first address fundamental Buddhist ideas and practices, then their elaboration in the Mahayana and tantric movements, which emerged in the first millennium CE in India. We also consider the diffusion of Buddhism throughout Asia and to the West. Attention will be given to both continuity and diversity within Buddhism--to its commonalities and transformations in specific historical and cultural settings. We also will address philosophical, social, political, and ethical problems that are debated among Buddhists and scholars of Buddhism today.

RELG 220.00 Justice and Responsibility 6 credits

Lori K Pearson

How have religious thinkers understood the demands of justice, the work of love, and the relation of both to power and politics? Is resistance or compromise the most appropriate way to bring justice to human relations? How should the ideals of faith inform questions about political authority, struggles for equality, and engagement with difference? This course draws on Christian theology, African American religious thought, and Jewish thought to explore a range of questions about ethics and social change. Along the way, we encounter diverse models of human selfhood, moral obligation, and the role of religion in public life.

RELG 257.00 Asian Religions and Ecology 6 credits

Jonathan H Dickstein

How “eco-friendly” are Asian religious traditions? What does “eco-friendly” even mean? This course begins with an overview of the major religious traditions of South, Southeast, Central, and East Asia. From this foundation, we turn to modern and contemporary ecological thinkers, movements, and policies and discuss their indebtedness to, and divergence from, various religious heritages. We will also explore how modernity, capitalism, industrialization, climate collapse, and Western environmental movements have influenced eco-advocacy in contemporary Asia.

RELG 300.00 Theories and Methods in the Study of Religion 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 9, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 301

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 65356

Lori K Pearson

What, exactly, is religion and what conditions of modernity have made it urgent to articulate such a question in the first place? Why does religion exert such force in human society and history? Is it an opiate of the masses or an illusion laden with human wish-fulfillment? Is it a social glue? A subjective experience of the sacred? Is it simply a universalized Protestant Christianity in disguise, useful in understanding, and colonizing, the non-Christian world? This seminar, for junior majors and advanced majors from related fields, explores generative theories from anthropology, sociology, psychology, literary studies, and the history of religions.

RELG 344.00 Lived Religion in America 6 credits

Michael D McNally

The practices of popular, or local, or lived religion in American culture often blur the distinction between the sacred and profane and elude religious studies frameworks based on the narrative, theological, or institutional foundations of "official" religion. This course explores American religion primarily through the lens of the practices of lived religion with respect to ritual, the body, the life cycle, the market, leisure, and popular culture. Consideration of a wide range of topics, including ritual healing, Christmas, cremation, and Elvis, will nourish an ongoing discussion about how to make sense of lived religion.

RELG 399.00 Senior Research Seminar 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 6, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 303

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 65357

Kristin C Bloomer

This seminar will acquaint students with research tools in various fields of religious studies, provide an opportunity to present and discuss research work in progress, hone writing skills, and improve oral presentation techniques.

Prerequisite: Religion 300 and acceptance of proposal for senior integrative exercise and instructor permission.

RUSS 237.00 Beyond Beef Stroganoff: Food in Russian Culture 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 12, Waitlist: 0

Language & Dining Center 330

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 65064

Laura Goering

How did the Russian peasant stove shape culinary culture? Why did Catherine the Great force her subjects to cultivate potatoes? How did the October Revolution change the way Soviet citizens ate? In this course we will study key aspects of Russian history and culture through the lens of culinary history. Topics will include: food and fasting in Russian Orthodoxy; food, class and power under the tsars; high Russian (or is it French?) culture of the nineteenth century; Soviet policies for feeding the worker; non-Russian cuisines in the Soviet Union; drinking culture and anti-alcohol campaigns; food and nationalism in the twenty-first century. Includes hands-on sessions on Russian food preparation. In English.

In translation

SPAN 345.00 Culture, Capitalism and the Commons 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 19, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 235

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 64986

Palmar Álvarez-Blanco

Have you ever wondered if not capitalism, then what? In this course we will critically approach the historical background, the causes and, most importantly, the consequences of the civil and ecological crisis unleashed globally in 2008. Both in its origin and its consequences, this crisis went beyond the financial field, extending into the realms of politics, economics, culture, media and ecology. In light of this context, we will take a transdisciplinary approach to the study of capitalist culture and analyze the main changes that have developed from the cycle of social mobilizations surrounding the "indignados" movement or Spanish 15M in 2011. With a primary focus on Spain, we will concentrate on analyzing cultural artifacts that mark a paradigm shift from a capitalist culture towards the development of a culture of the commons that seeks to improve the living conditions of the social majority, defending both human rights and ecological justice.

Prerequisite: Spanish 205 or equivalent

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