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Your search for courses for 23/WI and in AND 036 found 10 courses.

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CGSC 330.00 Embodied Cognition 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 12, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 036

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 65657

Jonathan R McKinney

This seminar will consider recent work in philosophy, cognitive science and linguistics critical of views of human cognition as "disembodied" and Cartesian. Philosophical sources of the early critiques of symbolic AI and "cartesianism" will be considered (Merleau-Ponty, Dewey), as will the enactive (Cuffari, Di Paolo, and De Jaegher) and ecological (Chemero, Cowley, Steffensen) critiques of language, and current work on embodied cognition by Eleanor Rosch, Hubert Dreyfus, John Haugeland, Andy Clark and Evan Thompson. The seminar will include materials relevant to students in philosophy, linguistics, psychology and cognitive science.

Prerequisite: Cognitive Science 130, or Cognitive Science/Psychology 232 or permission of the instructor.

CHEM 224.52 Principles of Chemistry II and Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 24, Registered: 16, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 036 / Anderson Hall 229

MTWTHF
8:30am9:40am1:00pm5:00pm8:30am9:40am8:30am9:30am

Other Tags:

Synonym: 64436

Deborah S Gross, Rachel E Horness

A more advanced study of several core introductory chemistry principles. This course is suitable for students with advanced placement in chemistry or students who have completed Chemistry 123 or 128. Topics include coordination chemistry, advanced bonding models, spectroscopy, advanced acid/base and redox equilibria, and electrochemistry. The topics will be taught from varying perspectives using examples from biochemistry, the environment, energy, or materials chemistry. The lab will focus on developing computational, quantitative, and synthetic skills and will prepare students for more advanced laboratory work in chemistry.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 123 or Chemistry 128

CHEM 224.57 Principles of Chemistry II and Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 24, Registered: 18, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 036 / Anderson Hall 229

MTWTHF
8:30am9:40am8:00am12:00pm8:30am9:40am8:30am9:30am

Other Tags:

Synonym: 64437

Deborah S Gross, Rachel E Horness

A more advanced study of several core introductory chemistry principles. This course is suitable for students with advanced placement in chemistry or students who have completed Chemistry 123 or 128. Topics include coordination chemistry, advanced bonding models, spectroscopy, advanced acid/base and redox equilibria, and electrochemistry. The topics will be taught from varying perspectives using examples from biochemistry, the environment, energy, or materials chemistry. The lab will focus on developing computational, quantitative, and synthetic skills and will prepare students for more advanced laboratory work in chemistry.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 123 or Chemistry 128

IDSC 250.00 Color! 6 credits

Open: Size: 36, Registered: 27, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 036

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 63943

Marty Baylor, Jason A Decker, Julia F Strand

If you had to explain to a blind person the nature of color, how would you describe it? Is it a property of objects, oscillations of an electric field, a feature of how the eye generates electrochemical signals to send to the brain, or perhaps a property of the experiences themselves? This team-taught course takes  a multidisciplinary approach to color, drawing from physics, psychology, and philosophy. We will explore topics such as the nature of light, visual anatomy, the process by which light is converted to a neural code, color mixing, linguistic differences in color processing, and how color leads us to confront the tension that sometimes exists between appearance and reality.

Prerequisite: Any introductory PHIL or PSYC course higher than 110 or any term of introductory PHYS course higher than 130 (PHYS 131 and 151 or 152 or a 10 week introductory course)

PHYS 144.54 Astrophysical Systems: Mechanics and Relativity and Lab 6 credits

Closed: Size: 24, Registered: 22, Waitlist: 1

Anderson Hall 036 / Anderson Hall 021

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:00pm5:00pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 65150

Ryan C Terrien

This course begins by considering basic principles of physics in the realm of planetary systems, black holes and dark matter in the universe. Conservation of energy and momentum will be used to explore large-scale phenomena in the cosmos. The course moves beyond the Newtonian framework to address topics including special relativity and also selected applications to atomic, nuclear, and particle physics. Comfort with algebra and the integration and differentiation of elementary functions is assumed. Weekly laboratory work.

Prerequisite: Previous completion or concurrent registration in Mathematics 120 or 121. Not open to students who have completed Physics 131, 143, 145 or 151 at Carleton.

Held for First year students. Appropriate for students with prior calculus-based physics course such as an AP or IB course.

Waitlist for Sophomores, Juniors and Seniors: PHYS 144.WL4 (Synonym 65152)

PHYS 144.57 Astrophysical Systems: Mechanics and Relativity and Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 24, Registered: 16, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 036 / Anderson Hall 021

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm8:00am12:00pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 65151

Ryan C Terrien

This course begins by considering basic principles of physics in the realm of planetary systems, black holes and dark matter in the universe. Conservation of energy and momentum will be used to explore large-scale phenomena in the cosmos. The course moves beyond the Newtonian framework to address topics including special relativity and also selected applications to atomic, nuclear, and particle physics. Comfort with algebra and the integration and differentiation of elementary functions is assumed. Weekly laboratory work.

Prerequisite: Previous completion or concurrent registration in Mathematics 120 or 121. Not open to students who have completed Physics 131, 143, 145 or 151 at Carleton.

Held for First year students. Appropriate for students with prior calculus-based physics course such as an AP or IB course.

Waitlist for Sophomores, Juniors and Seniors: PHYS 144.WL7 (Synonym 65153)

PHYS 165.54 Introduction to Electricity, Magnetism, and Optics and Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 24, Registered: 21, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 036 / Anderson Hall 027

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am1:00pm5:00pm9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 65154

Melissa Eblen-Zayas, Valerie Fox

A study of the principles of electricity, magnetism, and optics with an emphasis on real-world applications including electronics, laser physics, astronomy, and medicine. Topics include electric and magnetic fields, electric potentials, DC and AC circuits, geometric and wave optics, and relevant properties of matter. Designed for science majors who want additional background in physics. Comfort with algebra and the integration and differentiation of elementary functions is assumed. One laboratory per week.

Prerequisite: Physics 131, 143, 144, or 145. Mathematics 120 or 121 suggested

PHYS 165.57 Introduction to Electricity, Magnetism, and Optics and Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 24, Registered: 19, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 036 / Anderson Hall 027

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am8:00am12:00pm9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 65155

Melissa Eblen-Zayas

A study of the principles of electricity, magnetism, and optics with an emphasis on real-world applications including electronics, laser physics, astronomy, and medicine. Topics include electric and magnetic fields, electric potentials, DC and AC circuits, geometric and wave optics, and relevant properties of matter. Designed for science majors who want additional background in physics. Comfort with algebra and the integration and differentiation of elementary functions is assumed. One laboratory per week.

Prerequisite: Physics 131, 143, 144, or 145. Mathematics 120 or 121 suggested

PHYS 231.00 Analytical and Computational Mechanics 6 credits

Open: Size: 32, Registered: 31, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 036

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 65156

Arjendu K Pattanayak

An analytical and computational treatment of classical mechanics using Lagrangian and Hamiltonian formalisms. A variety of systems, including some whose equations of motion cannot be solved analytically, will be explored. Possible examples include harmonic oscillators, central-force problems, chaotic dynamics, astrophysical systems, and medieval siege engines.

Prerequisite: Physics 131, 143 or 144 and Mathematics 210 or 211 or instructor permission

Formerly PHYS 229/230

PHYS 335.00 Quantum Mechanics 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 22, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 036

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 65157

Jay D Tasson

An examination of the structure of non-relativistic quantum mechanics and how this theory differs from those of classical physics. Topics include the mathematics of Hilbert space, the postulates of quantum mechanics, the motion of a particle in one dimension (including the free particle and the simple harmonic oscillator), the Heisenberg uncertainty principle, and spin. Multidimensional applications will include the harmonic oscillator, the hydrogen atom. Approximation techniques and applications will be presented.

Prerequisite: Physics 226 or 228, and Physics 231 and Mathematics 232. Familiarity with matrix algebra is assumed

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except Quantitative Reasoning, which requires 3 courses.
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