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Your search for courses for 23/WI and in HASE 105 found 7 courses.

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CHEM 289.00 Climate & Health: From Science to Practice in Ethiopia 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 12, Waitlist: 0

HASE 105

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 63878

Deborah S Gross, Tsegaye H Nega

This course is the second part of a two-term course sequence beginning with ENTS 289. This course will start with a multi-week trip to Ethiopia. While there, we will carry out a research program to assess the impact of cooking technologies on air quality in peoples’ homes, investigate the connections between regional and national environmental impacts and individual choices, and meet with national and international organizations working on these issues. We will work in both urban Addis Ababa and a rural area, Wolkite, to explore both types of settings. Back on campus during winter term, we will reflect on our experiences, analyze data, prepare and make public presentations, and propose appropriate follow-up projects.

Prerequisite: Enrollment in ENTS 289 the term before

Ethiopia Winter Break Program

CHEM 400.05 Integrative Exercise 5 credits, S/CR/NC only

Open: Size: 10, Registered: 9, Waitlist: 0

HASE 105

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 64463

Joe Chihade

Three alternatives exist for the department comprehensive exercise. Most students elect to join a discussion group that studies the research of a distinguished chemist or particular research problem in depth. Other students elect to write a long paper based on research in the primary literature, or write a paper expanding on their own research investigations. Most of the work for Chemistry 400 is expected to be accomplished during winter term. Students should enroll for five credits of Chemistry 400 during the winter, receive a "CI" at the end of that term, and then enroll for one credit during the spring, with the final evaluation and grade being awarded during spring term. Starting with the class of 2024, Chemistry majors will be required to attend at least 10 seminars between the term in which they declare and the end of winter term of their senior year to ensure breadth in the exposure to the ways chemists approach their work.

LCST 245.00 The Critical Toolbox: Who's Afraid of Theory? 6 credits

Seth E Peabody

This class introduces students to the various theoretical frameworks and the many approaches scholars can use when analyzing a text (whether this text is a film, an image, a literary piece or a performance). What do words like ‘structuralism,’ ‘ecocriticism,’ 'cultural studies,' and ‘postcolonial studies’ refer to? Most importantly, how do they help us understand the world around us? This class will be organized around interdisciplinary theoretical readings and exercises in cultural analysis.

Prerequisite: At least one 200- or 300-level course in Literary/Artistic Analysis (in any language) or instructor permission

POSC 265.00 Public Policy and Global Capitalism 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 23, Waitlist: 0

HASE 105

MTWTHF
8:30am9:40am8:30am9:40am8:30am9:30am
Synonym: 65128

Alfred P Montero

This course provides a comprehensive introduction to comparative and international public policy. It examines major theories and approaches to public policy design and implementation in several major areas: international policy economy (including the study of international trade and monetary policy, financial regulation, and comparative welfare policy), global public health and comparative healthcare policy, institutional development (including democratic governance, accountability systems, and judicial reform), and environmental public policy.

Prerequisite: Statistics 120 (formerly Mathematics 215) strongly recommended, or instructor permission

POSC 271.00 Constitutional Law I 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 24, Waitlist: 7

HASE 105

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 65129

Steven G Poskanzer

This course will explore the United States Constitution and the legal doctrines that have emerged from it, using them as lenses through which to understand the history—and shape the future—of this country. Using prominent Supreme Court opinions as teaching tools and loci of debate (including cases on the Court’s recent and current docket), this course will explore the different kind of theoretical approaches with which to make Constitutional arguments and interpret the Constitution. It is one of two paired courses (the other being POSC 272) that complement each other. Both courses will address the structure and functioning of the United States government, and will explore in greater depth the historic Constitutional “trends” towards greater equality and more liberty (albeit slowly, haltingly, and with steps both forward and backward). This course will focus in particular on how matters of racial justice have been a Constitutional issue from the very beginning of the nation—and very much remain unfinished legal work. In exploring matters of personal liberty, this course will focus in particular on First Amendment freedom of religion.  Finally, in examining governmental structures, this course will emphasize federalism and the distribution of power between the national and state governments, including the rise of a nationwide economic system and the modern administrative state. The course will require close reading of judicial opinions and other texts, and learning how to construct arguments using logic and precedent. A special feature of this course will be detailed examination and intra-class mock debate of the cases the Supreme Court will hear this fall challenging raced-based affirmative action programs at private and public universities. 

POSC 282.00 Terrorism and Counterterrorism 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 22, Waitlist: 0

HASE 105

MTWTHF
8:15am10:00am8:15am10:00am
Synonym: 65555

Jon R Olson

This course focuses on the historic and modern use of violence or the threat of violence by non-state actors to secure political outcomes. We will review the strategy and tactics of various terror groups, use case studies to understand the logic of terrorism, assess why some groups succeed while others fail, and study terrorist organizations’ efforts at recruitment and indoctrination. These topics will be addressed from theoretical and practical perspectives, with input from expert guest speakers. Finally, we will assess counterterrorism measures, including the moral, ethical, legal, and practical approaches to creating security in the modern world.

POSC 283.00 Separatist Movements 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 25, Waitlist: 0

HASE 105

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 65133

Dev Gupta

This course explores the emergence and resolution of separatist movements around the world. While separatist movements are often associated with the violent dissolution of states, not all separatist movements result in violence and not all separatist movements seek independence. We will investigate the conditions under which separatist pressures are most likely to develop and when such pressures result in actual separation. We will contrast the tactics of movements, from peaceful approaches in places like contemporary Quebec or Scotland, to peaceful outcomes like the "velvet divorce" of Czechoslovakia, to violent insurrections in places like the Philippines, Spain, and Northern Ireland.

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Requirements
You must take 6 credits of each of these.
Overlays
You must take 6 credits of each of these,
except Quantitative Reasoning, which requires 3 courses.
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