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Your search for courses for 23/WI and in WCC 132 found 5 courses.

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CAMS 225.00 Film Noir: The Dark Side of the American Dream 6 credits

Carol Donelan

After Americans grasped the enormity of the Depression and World War II, the glossy fantasies of 1930s cinema seemed hollow indeed. During the 1940s, the movies, our true national pastime, took a nosedive into pessimism. The result? A collection of exceptional films populated with tough guys and dangerous women lurking in the shadows of nasty urban landscapes. This course focuses on classic American noir as well as neo-noir from a variety of perspectives, including mode and genre, visual style and narrative structure, postwar culture and politics, and race, gender, and sexuality. Requirements include two screenings per week and several short papers.

Extra Time required. Evening Screenings.

CAMS 246.00 Documentary Studies 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 24, Waitlist: 4

Weitz Center 132

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 64230

Cecilia M Cornejo

This course explores the relevance and influence of documentary films by closely examining the aesthetic concerns and ethical implications inherent in these productions. We study these works both as artistic undertakings and as documents produced within a specific time, culture, and ideology. Central to our understanding of the form are issues of technology, methodology, and ethics, which are examined thematically as well as chronologically. The course offers an overview of the major historical movements in documentary film along more recent works; it combines screenings, readings, and discussions with the goal of preparing students to both understand and analyze documentary films.

Extra Time Required, weekly evening in-person screenings Tuesdays

CAMS 371.00 Advanced Production Workshop II 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 11, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 132

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:35pm1:50pm3:35pm

Requirements Met:

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Synonym: 64231

Laska Jimsen

Advanced Production Workshop II is taken in conjunction with CAMS 400 for students completing production comps. Production projects are inherently collaborative; this course supports collaboration through workshops, crewing, and informed critique. This course is the second in the advanced production workshop sequence with a focus on production and post-production. Please contact instructor for further information.

Prerequisite: Cinema and Media Studies 370 or instructor consent

Project Proposal required, Extra Time Required

ENTS 212.00 Global Food Systems 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 8, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 132

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 64745

Tsegaye H Nega

The course offers a survey of the world's food systems--and its critics--from the initial domestication of plants and animals to our day. We will begin by examining the critical theoretical and foundational issues on the subject, and then turn to a series of case studies that illuminate major themes around the world. Topics will include land and animal husbandry, the problem of food security, food politics, the Green Revolution, biotechnology, and the implications of global climate change. Throughout the course, students will assess and seek to integrate differing disciplinary and methodological approaches. The class will include field experiences.

ENTS 244.00 Biodiversity Conservation and Development 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 9, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 132

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 64746

Tsegaye H Nega

How can the need for intensive human social and economic development be reconciled with the conservation of biodiversity? This course explores the wide range of actions that people take at a local, national, and international level to address this question. We will use political ecology and conservation biology as theoretical frameworks to examine the role of traditional and indigenous approaches to biodiversity conservation as well as contemporary debates about integrated conservation development across a spectrum of cultures in North America, Africa, Latin America, and Asia.

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You must take 6 credits of each of these.
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