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Your search for courses for 23/WI and in WILL 203 found 6 courses.

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AMST 238.00 9/11 and the War on Terror in American Culture 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 22, Waitlist: 0

Willis 203

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 65830

Christopher M Elias

An exploration of how the terrorist attacks of 9/11/2001 and the subsequent War on Terror impacted American culture. We will focus on issues of both form (the elements determining the look and feel of post-9/11 artwork) and content (the social and moral concerns driving post-9/11 culture). Shared texts will include novels, short stories, poetry, music, art, and films. Particular attention will be paid to themes such as race and racism, religion and religious discrimination, immigration and xenophobia, debates over American exceptionalism, critiques of American capitalism, the "death of irony," attempts to define "truth," and the spread of conspiracy theories. 

ECON 110.02 Principles of Macroeconomics 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 25, Waitlist: 0

Willis 203

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am

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Synonym: 64621

Yingtong Xie

This course gives students a foundation in the general principles of economics as a basis for effective citizenship and, when combined with 111, as a preparation for all advanced study in economics. Topics include analysis of the measurement, level, and distribution of national income; the concepts of inflation and depression; the role and structure of the banking system; fiscal and monetary stabilization techniques; implications of and limits to economic growth; and international economic relations.

ECON 267.00 Behavioral Economics 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 21, Waitlist: 9

Willis 203

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 64634

Jonathan M Lafky

This course introduces experimental economics and behavioral economics as two complementary approaches to understanding economic decision making. We will study the use of controlled experiments to test and critique economic theories, as well as how these theories can be improved by introducing psychologically plausible assumptions to our models. We will read a broad survey of experimental and behavioral results, including risk and time preferences, prospect theory, other-regarding preferences, the design of laboratory and field experiments, and biases in decision making.

Prerequisite: Economics 110 and 111

ENTS 275.00 The Arts and Environmental Justice 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 9, Waitlist: 0

Willis 203

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm

Requirements Met:

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Synonym: 65879

Colleen M Carpenter

How are artists today engaging with climate change, pollution, and other aspects of the planet’s environmental crisis? And are their creative works making any difference? In The Great Derangement, novelist and social anthropologist Amitav Ghosh argues that today’s literary fiction has failed to engage climate change in a meaningful and transformative way: we will read several “climate novels” to test his claim. We will also look at visual arts and music, including work by Maya Lin, Patricia Johanson, and collaborative artist/science/community projects such as those led by CALL, City as Living Laboratory.

LING 216.00 Generative Approaches to Syntax 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 9, Waitlist: 0

Willis 203

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 64576

Morgan Rood

This course has two primary goals: to provide participants with a forum to continue to develop their analytical skills (i.e. to 'do syntax'), and to acquaint them with generative syntactic theory, especially the Principles and Parameters approach. Participants will sharpen their technological acumen, through weekly problem solving, and engage in independent thinking and analysis, by means of formally proposing novel syntactic analyses for linguistic phenomena. By the conclusion of the course, participants will be prepared to read and critically evaluate primary literature couched within this theoretical framework.

Prerequisite: Linguistics 115

POSC 212.00 Political Psychology of Elites 3 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 14, Waitlist: 0

Willis 203

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 65834

Dan Stevens

When we study the decisions of political leaders, we often consider them in terms of power relations between states. The class examines psychological explanations of leaders’ decision-making. We focus on political elites’ actions, especially in foreign policy asking, why otherwise intelligent and savvy individuals and groups often make very poor decisions. Students will learn about different theoretical perspectives and how to apply them to different historical examples in the study of elite decision-making from the Cuban Missile Crisis, to the Covid pandemic. Students will evaluate contending theories, joining theory and practice to explain elites’ motives and decisions shaping world politics.

2nd 5 weeks

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