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Your search for courses for 24/WI and with Special Interest: SPECINTAPPACAD or SPECINTTHEOACAD found 22 courses.

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ARTH 262.07 Architectural Studies in Europe Program: Community-Engaged Design 3 credits

Open: Size: 26, Registered: 25, Waitlist: 0

Synonym: 65715

Ross Elfline

In recent years, architects and urban planners have increasingly moved away from the total-design methods that often typified the Modern Movement of architecture in which the master planner oversaw every aspect of design “from the teaspoon to the city.” In its place, many designers have engaged local resources and forms of knowledge rooted in communities as the basis for architecture and urban planning schemes. This course considers case studies in community-based design practices by looking at both the products of such labor as well as the distinct processes that empowered residents to refashion their own surroundings from the ground up.

Prerequisite: Participation in Architectural Studies in Europe program

Requires participation in OCS Program: Architectural Studies in Europe

BIOL 310.00 Immunology 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 23, Waitlist: 0

Hulings 316

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 68720

Debby Walser-Kuntz

This course will examine the role of the immune system in defense, allergic reactions, and autoimmunity. Topics to be covered include the structure and function of antibodies, cytokines, the role of the major histocompatibility complex in antigen presentation, cellular immunity, immunodeficiencies, and current techniques used to study immune responses.

Prerequisite: Biology 125 and 126 and either Biology 240 or 280

CCST 275.00 I'm A Stranger Here Myself 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 5, Waitlist: 0

Language & Dining Center 205

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 67470

Eva Posfay

What do enculturation, tourism, culture shock, "going native," haptics, cross-cultural adjustment, and third culture kids have in common? How do intercultural transitions shape identity? What is intercultural competence? This course explores theories about intercultural contact and tests their usefulness by applying them to the analysis of world literature, case studies, and the visual arts, and by employing students' intercultural experiences as evidence. From individualized, self-reflective exercises to community-oriented group endeavors, our activities will promote new intercultural paradigms in the classroom and the wider community. Course designed for off-campus returnees, students who have lived abroad, or who have experienced being outsiders.

CS 400.01 Integrative Exercise 3 credits, S/CR/NC only

Open: Size: 8, Registered: 6, Waitlist: 0

Olin 312

MTWTHF
9:15am10:15am
Synonym: 67594

Eric Alexander

Beginning with the prototypes developed in the Senior Seminar (CS 399), project teams will complete their project and present it to the department. Required of all senior majors. Each CS 400 is paired with a particular section of CS 399, and the prerequisite for CS 400 must be filled by satisfactory completion of that CS 399.

Prerequisite: Computer Science 399

CS 400.03 Integrative Exercise 3 credits, S/CR/NC only

Open: Size: 8, Registered: 5, Waitlist: 0

Olin 312

MTWTHF
2:25pm3:25pm
Synonym: 67596

Eric Alexander

Beginning with the prototypes developed in the Senior Seminar (CS 399), project teams will complete their project and present it to the department. Required of all senior majors. Each CS 400 is paired with a particular section of CS 399, and the prerequisite for CS 400 must be filled by satisfactory completion of that CS 399.

Prerequisite: Computer Science 399

HIST 139.00 Foundations of Modern Europe 6 credits

Susannah Ottaway

Witch hunts, religious reforms, economic transformation, global expansion... all of these phenomena exemplify the dynamic centuries c. 1500-1750, known as the early modern period in Europe. This course surveys the history of Western Europe from the Renaissance and Reformation through the era of the Scientific Revolution and Enlightenment. We compare the development of states and societies across Western Europe in the larger context of expanding global trade and exchange with the Americas, Africa, South Asia and Japan.

HIST 200.00 Historians for Hire 3 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 10, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 303

MTWTHF
3:10pm4:55pm
Synonym: 67670

Susannah Ottaway

Designed to give students experiences and skills in public history and history education, this three-credit course offers students a choice among projects connected to local organizations and some partners farther afield. Students will have the opportunity to develop skills connected to archiving, building online materials such as maps and websites, and learning historical methods like oral history interviews or exhibit design. Most projects involve close collaborations with local community organizations, allowing students to become more connected with organizations outside of Carleton.

Extra Time Required

HIST 316.00 Presenting America's Founding 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 13, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 236

MTWTHF
8:15am10:00am8:15am10:00am
Synonym: 67678

Serena Zabin

This course is the second half of a two-course sequence focused on the study of the founding of the United States in American public life. The course will begin with a two-week off-campus study program during winter break in Washington, D.C and Boston, where we will visit world-class museums and historical societies, meet with museum professionals, and learn about the goals and challenges of history museums, the secrets to successful exhibitions, and the work of museum curators and directors. The course will culminate in the winter term with the completion of an exhibit created in conjunction with one of the museums located on Boston’s Freedom Trail.

Prerequisite: History 315

Participation in Winter Break History Program

IDSC 258.00 Consensus or Contentious? Controversies in Science Then and Now 2 credits

Closed: Size: 15, Registered: 12, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 323

MTWTHF
2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 68920

Antony Adler, Rika Anderson

Almost every global challenge confronting humankind requires some level of engagement with science and technology. However, finding solutions to our most pressing problems also requires an understanding of how science operates within its social, political, and cultural context. This course will explore the relationship between science and society by examining a series of controversies in science from both the past and the present. We will investigate topics such as biological and social concepts of race, the use of unethically obtained scientific results, the ethics of genomics research, legislation over vaccination mandates, “parachute” science, and climate change denial. Examining the role of science in society will help us understand issues related to the use of evidence, expertise, and the relationship between science and politics. By wrestling with current and historic scientific controversies, we will examine the ways in which scientific disagreements are often as much about values as they are about research methods.

IDSC 298.00 FOCUS Sophomore Colloquium 1 credit, S/CR/NC only

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 20, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 329

MTWTHF
3:10pm4:20pm
Synonym: 68863

Mija Van Der Wege

This colloquium is designed for sophomore students participating in the Focusing on Cultivating Scientists program. It will provide an opportunity to participate in STEM-based projects on campus and in the community. The topics of this project-based colloquium will vary each term.

Prerequisite: Interdisciplinary Studies 198 as first year student

Prior registration in IDSC 198

MUSC 126.00 America's Music 6 credits

Victoria Aschheim

A survey of American music with particular attention to the interaction of the folk, popular, and classical realms. No musical experience required.

MUSC 339.00 Music and Humanitarianism 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 6, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 231

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 69259

Melissa Scott

Can music be a form of international aid? How do humanitarian interventions inform musical encounters? This course approaches these questions by considering the ethical and political ambivalence of humanitarian projects in global perspective. As we will explore, musicians navigate this ambivalence when performing in televised fundraisers and music festivals, alongside international NGO programs, and throughout their own experiences of displacement. We will study musical recordings, film, and critical readings in order to discover how music offers multi-sensory perspectives for engaging with the anthropology of humanitarianism and Critical Refugee Studies.

PE 340.07 Sport and Globalization in London and Seville Program: Introductory Coaching Practicum 4 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 23, Waitlist: 0

Synonym: 67221

Bob Carlson

Designed for students who may or may not have any previous playing or coaching experience, this course will cover introductory methods of coaching and teaching young athletes. Specifically, students will practice methods of teaching skills, structure, and strategies of team-oriented sports. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the coaching profession at different levels, developing coaching skills and creating a philosophy of coaching in a cross-cultural setting.

Requires participation in OCS Program: Sport and Globalization in London and Seville

POSC 120.00 Democracy and Dictatorship 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 26, Waitlist: 0

CMC 301

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 68058

Huan Gao

An introduction to the array of different democratic and authoritarian political institutions in both developing and developed countries. We will also explore key issues in contemporary politics in countries around the world, such as nationalism and independence movements, revolution, regime change, state-making, and social movements.

Sophomore Priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: POSC 120.WL0 (Synonym 68059)

POSC 288.07 Politics and Public Policy in Washington, D.C., Program: Global Politics & Pub Policy in Washington DC 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 17, Waitlist: 0

Synonym: 67152

Greg Marfleet

Students will participate in a seminar centered around meetings with experts in areas of global politics and policy. Over the course of the term they will collaborate in groups to produce a presentation exploring the political dimensions of public policy with a focus on how problem identification, institutional capacity, and stakeholder interests combine to shape policy options.

Prerequisite: Mathematics 215, Statistics 120 or other statistics courses and participation in Washington DC OCS program

Requires participation in OCS Program: Politics and Public Policy in Washington, D.C.

POSC 289.07 Politics and Public Policy in Washington, D.C., Program: Politics & Public Policy in Washington DC 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 17, Waitlist: 0

Synonym: 66104

Greg Marfleet

Students will participate in a seminar centered around meetings with experts in areas of U.S. politics and policy. Over the course of the term they will collaborate in groups to produce a presentation exploring the political dimensions of public policy with a focus on how problem identification, institutional capacity, and stakeholder interests combine to shape policy options.

Prerequisite: Mathematics 215, Statistics 120 or other statistics course and participation in Washington DC OCS program

Requires participation in OCS Program: Politics and Public Policy in Washington, D.C.

POSC 293.07 Politics and Public Policy in Washington, D.C., Program: Practical Experience in DC 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 17, Waitlist: 0

Synonym: 67223

Greg Marfleet

All students will intern at an office in Washington or participate in some form of sustained civic engagement activity with instructor approval. In the past students have worked for legislators, executive agencies, interest groups and media outlets. Part of this experience involves keeping a weekly journal and writing a reflective summary paper.

Prerequisite: Participation in Washington DC OCS program

Requires participation in OCS Program: Politics and Public Policy in Washington, D.C. Extra time required

POSC 315.00 Polarization and Democratic Decline in the United States 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 8, Waitlist: 0

Laird 007

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 69270

Ryan Dawkins

The United States is more politically polarized today than at any time since the late nineteenth century, leaving lawmakers, journalists, and experts increasingly concerned that the toxicity in our politics is making the country vulnerable to political instability, violence, and democratic decline. Moreover, citizens are increasingly willing to call into question the legitimacy of this country’s core electoral and governing institutions. How did the U.S. get to this point? What can be done about it? This course will examine political polarization as a central feature of American politics and the consequences for American democracy.

RELG 233.00 Gender and Power in the Catholic Church 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 24, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 330

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 67725

Sonja Anderson

How does power flow and concentrate in the Catholic Church? What are the gendered aspects of the Church’s structure, history, and theology? Through readings, discussions, and analysis of current media, students will develop the ability to critically and empathetically interpret issues of gender, sexuality, and power in the Catholic Church, especially as these issues appear in official Vatican texts. Topics include: God, suffering, sacraments, salvation, damnation, celibacy, homosexuality, the family, saints, the ordination of women as priests, feminist theologies, canon law, the censuring of “heretical” theologians, Catholic hospital policy, and the clerical sex abuse crisis.

SOAN 214.00 Neighborhoods and Cities: Inequalities and Identities 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 20, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 426

MTWTHF
3:10pm4:55pm3:10pm4:55pm
Synonym: 68232

Daniel Williams

Inequalities and identities are well understood yet too often disconnected from the context of space and place. In this class, we discuss the ways that neighborhoods and cities are sites of inequality as well as identity. Neighborhoods are linked to the amount of wealth we hold; the schools we attend; the goods, services, and resources we have access to; and who our neighbors are. Neighborhoods are also spaces where identities and community are created, claimed, and contested. They can also be sites of conflict as they change through gentrification or other processes that often reflect inequalities of power, resources, and status. In this course, special attention will be paid to how race, gender and sexuality, and immigration shape inequalities and identity in neighborhoods and cities. This course will also include an academic civic engagement component, collaborating with local communities in Minnesota.

Prerequisite: The department strongly recommends that Sociology/Anthropology 110 or 111 be taken prior to enrolling in courses numbered 200 or above.

SPAN 244.00 Spain Today: Recent Changes through Narrative and Film 6 credits

Palmar Alvarez-Blanco

Since the death of Franco in 1975, Spain has undergone huge political, socio-economic, and cultural transformations. Changes in the traditional roles of women, the legalization of gay marriage, the decline of the Catholic church, the increase of immigrants, Catalan and Basque nationalisms, and the integration of Spain in the European Union, have all challenged the definition of a national identity. Through contemporary narrative and film, this course will examine some of these changes and how they contribute to the creation of what we call Spain today.

Prerequisite: Spanish 204 or equivalent

STAT 285.00 Statistical Consulting 2 credits, S/CR/NC only

Closed: Size: 0, Registered: 11, Waitlist: 0

CMC 304

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 67932

Adam Loy

Students will apply their statistical knowledge by analyzing data problems solicited from the Northfield community. Students will also learn basic consulting skills, including communication and ethics.

Prerequisite: Statistics 230 and instructor permission

All interested students are encouraged to add to the waitlist and the instructor will reach out after registration. This course is repeatable, but if the instructor cannot admit every student on the waitlist, priority will be given first to Statistics majors who have not previously taken the course and then to other students who have not taken the course.

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Requirements
You must take 6 credits of each of these.
Overlays
You must take 6 credits of each of these,
except Quantitative Reasoning, which requires 3 courses.
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