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  • Falling short? (Login Required)

    Admitting a position outside of the echo chamber

  • Navigating my frustration with identity politics (Login Required)

    What hurts the most, however, is that those who accuse me of wallowing in the world of white America forget that I, in many parts of this country that I love, am still viewed with suspicion and even hatred. There are some people who think of me as an outsider, a parasite who has to be “returned” to the land where I really belong. Those who play the game of identity politics conveniently forget that I at times have faced onslaughts of racial slurs that many readers of this column are most likely, and most unfortunately, all too familiar with.

  • A daily protest (Login Required)

    Not only does food construct community, memories, and satiated appetites, eating it is one of the most intimate ways to reconnect to nature.

  • When the streets go quiet (Login Required)

    What we do may seem radical, but it is actually simple. For example, if a patient must keep the abortion a secret from their family, we can look them in the eye to provide comfort. This isn’t a special role; it is being human. Being a doula can mean wiping away a tear, chatting about the weather, or breathing alongside patients. As human beings, we doulas are sensitive to the array of emotions that one in every three women will experience at some point in their life.

  • Between criticism and acceptance (Login Required)

    Ultimately, I want to recognize that the agreeable style of protesting that characterizes Food Truth and the Benedictine nuns and the aggressively honest style of my crazy English teacher are both important. Because ideas cannot be simultaneously subverted and promoted, there can’t be a “right” way to protest when dealing with contentious issues like food. When the need to appeal to an audience clashes with the need to spread new values, activists must choose a way to protest that feels comfortable to them and then contribute within those bounds.

  • If it gets the point across... (Login Required)

    By stopping traffic, these people in their cars are temporarily struggling through circumstances that they cannot control. BLM uses this tactic as a way of representing the struggles the black community suffers through, struggles that they too cannot control.

  • The difficulty of keeping Passover at Carleton (Login Required)

    Jewish law, for all its restrictions, insists on individual health and safety above all other practices. So I stopped observing Passover. But that should never have happened to begin with. On a residential campus, I expect my meal plan to cover my dietary needs. Yet for over a week, one thirtieth of Carleton’s academic year, this was not true.

  • Transcending sovereignty (Login Required)

    It is absurd that this debate still exists. In the face of one of history’s worst humanitarian crises, the answer should be so clear that the need to ask the question should disappear. Indeed, the whole idea of asking the question – should we intervene, or should we remain on the sidelines – is itself an anachronism, a holdover of the 17th century.

  • Pax Americana: The need for U.S. intervention (Login Required)

    There are moments where eloquently written speeches and diplomatic resolutions at the United Nations fall short, and that is when the time for kinetic action begins.

  • Curiosity, remoteness and the anti-science moment (Login Required)

    We face a long-lived and lively anti-science and anti-expert moment, which unsurprisingly comes as the term "alternative facts" has entered the lexicon.

  • It gets people's attention... (Login Required)

    My point is that people generally only pay attention to information presented in an interesting way.

  • Conservative crisis in popular culture (Login Required)

    I cannot think of any conservative-leaning comedians that have a modicum of talent, and that is troubling.