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  • Big Freedia performed at The Cave.

    Photo feature: Big Freedia

    The self-proclaimed “Queen Diva” of Bounce Music came to Carleton last week, giving a talk as well as performing at The Cave.

  • Students and administrators watch presentations made during last Wednesday’s Town Hall meeting.

    CSA hosts town hall meeting on traditions

    Traditions were the subject of the town hall meeting held by CSA last Wednesday. Traditions are usually at the will of the community from which they originate. As Eric Hillman, the Carleton Archivist, says, “Tradition is what’s formed in a community over time” and Carleton has its fair share of different traditions.

  • R. Dale Guthrie delivering last week’s convocation on paleothic art.

    Paleobiologist explains paleolithic art

    “What was our natural life history? Can it tell us something about our morals, love, and even our religion today?” This was the question that renowned paleobiologist R. Dale Guthrie posed as he delivered convocation last Friday, October 15.

  • Mahmud Rahman

    Mahmud Rahman reads experts from his work

    Soft-spoken but articulate, petite but forceful, Mahmud Rahman stood in the Anthenaeum last Thursday, Oct. 14 as he read to an audience of about twenty people. He gave a reading of four separate excerpts from his collection of short fiction, entitled “Killing the Water”, which was published last January.

  • An artist's rendering of a pulsar.

    Andrea Lommen ‘91 notices a wrinkle in the cosmos

    Creases in the fabric of space-time. Though the notion seems to forbode some daunting task involving abstract phenomena, the theory is not so remote. On Thurs., Oct. 14, Carleton alumnus and astrophysicist Andrea Lommen ‘91 presented a lecture regarding the modern employment of pulsars in detecting “folds” in gravitational waves.

  • Professor Fred Hagstrom

    Hagstrom presents on story of Frank Shigemura

    This past Wednesday, Professor Fred Hagstrom gave a presentation entitled “From Minidoka to Minnesota” about the story of Frank Shigemura, a Japanese-American who came to Carleton from an internment camp during World War II as part of a scholarship created to help remove students from internment camps.

  • Flood causes $3.2 million in damage

    Sediment on West FieldNow that the waters have fully receded back into the Cannon River, Carleton has begun to address the extent of damage to the college and begun to replace and repair ruined items. According to an email sent out to Carleton staff, faculty, and students on October 8, the current damage estimate rests at $3.2 million, most of which should be insured.

  • Karen Tei Yamashita

    Carleton alum finalist for 2010 National Book Award

    Karen Tei Yamashita '73 has been named a finalist for the 2010 National Book Award for the novel I Hotel, Yamashita’s fifth book. The book is about struggles for civil rights set in San Francisco’s Chinatown from 1968-1977.

  • Cafeteria tray

    Trayless Tuesdays coming to LDC

    As you walk into the LDC next Tuesday, be prepared to make a few changes in your eating habits. The food will be the same, but the trays will be gone. With the leadership of the Sustainability Assistants (STAs) and the support of more than 570 Carleton students, the CSA passed a resolution to eliminate trays from the East Dining Hall (LDC) on Tuesdays.

  • Ben Katchor

    Graphic Artist Katchor presents comic on cafeterias

    Aboard the musty 15-minute Chicago train ride he took each day, Ben Katchor needed to find a way to channel his boredom. Observing the beauty in the blur of buildings that passed through the window, he was inspired to begin working on comic strips.

  • Bon Appetit logo

    Bon Appetit Fellows present “Stories from the Fields,” explain farming industry

    Last Tuesday, two Fellows from the Bon Appétit Management Company Foundation gave a presentation titled “Stories from the Field”, which covered Carleton’s food service’s methodology, farm workers’ rights, how Bon Appétit tries to provide sustainable food for its patrons, and American farmers’ working conditions.

  • Sandra Cisneros delivers the Convocation.

    Cisneros delivers convo in pajamas

    Award-winning American author Sandra Cisneros, famous for her acclaimed first novel The House on Mango Street – which she wrote just out of undergraduate studies – enthusiastically delivered a convocation speech about writing, death, and spiritual health, all while wearing her brand new blue pajamas.