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Asian Languages and Literatures (ASLL)

Chair: Professor Mariko Kaga

Professors: Mark Hansell, Mariko Kaga, Kathryn W. Sparling, Qiguang Zhao

Assistant Professors: Noboru Tomonari, Hong Zeng

Visiting Instructor: Hsin-Tzu Liu

The department of Asian Languages and Literatures offers introductory, intermediate, and advanced courses in Chinese and Japanese language, plus a variety of courses in traditional and modern Chinese and Japanese literature in English translation and some linguistics courses related to Asian Languages. Accommodation can be made for students who can speak, but cannot read or write the languages. At the intermediate level, students are encouraged to participate in one of several approved academic programs in China or Japan. A major in Chinese or Japanese is available by petition.

Certificate of Advanced Study in Foreign Language and Literature or Area Studies: In order to receive the Certificate of Advanced Study in Asian Languages students must fulfill the general requirements (refer to Academic Regulations) in the following course distribution: six courses beyond 204, choosing either Japanese or Chinese as the target language. At least four of the six courses must be taught in the target language; at least one must be a course in literature or linguistics related to the target language and conducted in English, and the remaining course may be chosen from either category. Although courses for the certificate may be taken on a S/CR/NC basis, "D" or "CR" level work will not be sufficient to satisfy course requirements.

Language Houses: Students have the opportunity to immerse themselves in the language by living in the Language House. The Associate is a native speaker, and students organize and participate in numerous cultural activities in the language houses.

Asian Language Courses (ASLN)

ASLN 111. Writing Systems The structure and function of writing systems, with emphasis on a comparison of East Asian writing systems (Chinese, Japanese, Korean) to Western alphabetic systems. Topics covered include classification of writing systems, historical development, diffusion and borrowing of writing systems, and comparison with non-writing symbol systems. 6 cr., SS, Not offered in 2006-2007.

ASLN 231. Intercultural Texts: Japanese and Indian Women Writing Abroad A close look at a variety of novels and short stories that present one culture to another and (defamiliarized, often in translation) to itself. The Indian texts were written in English, largely about India. The Japanese texts were originally written in Japanese and are set in Australia, France, and the U.S. Cultural phenomena such as mutual exoticism, bicultural families, cultural (dis)integration, and racial prejudice, are central to all the texts chosen. They give fundamental place to contemporary women living outside their "mother" cultures. No prerequisites, no knowledge of Japan or India required. 6 cr., AL, Not offered in 2006-2007.

ASLN 237. Tao of Wisdom in Asian Literature: Chinese Roots, Lebanese Prophets, and Indian Stray Birds We will enter the poetic and philosophical world formed by Lao Tzu's Tao Te Ching, Hong Yingming's Roots of Wisdom, Gibran's Prophet and Tagore's Stray Birds. These Chinese, Lebanese and Indian writers have found a common tool by which liberty, health, and joy may be shaped through words and images. They urge us to be patient towards all that is unsolved and to love questions themselves like the books written in their wise and aphoristic tongues. Together with these Asian thinkers, we will find the beauty hidden in the mysteries of nature. All readings are in English translation. 6 cr., AL, SpringQ. Zhao

ASLN 260. Historical Linguistics Concepts and techniques of historical linguistics, especially methods used in the discovery of family relationships between languages and the reconstruction of ancestral forms. Other topics include grammatical, semantic, and lexical change, processes of sound change, language contact, and the use of linguistic evidence in cultural reconstruction. In addition to the more familiar Indo-European languages, data will come from Western Pacific and Australian languages, and especially East Asian languages. Prerequisite: previous experience in linguistics or instructor's permission. 6 cr., SS, SpringM. Hansell

Chinese Courses (CHIN)

CHIN 101, 102, 103. Elementary Chinese Introduction to Chinese sentence structure and writing system, together with the development of basic aural/oral skills, with attention to the cultural context. Students who have learned spoken Mandarin Chinese at home or in another context, but who are unable to read or write, are encouraged to consult the department about the possibility of an independent study in Chinese Literacy given fall term. This six credit independent study will cover all the Chinese characters introduced in Chinese 101-204. Successful completion will allow the student to register for Chinese 205 winter term. 6 cr., ND, Fall,Winter,SpringStaff

CHIN 115. The Taoist Way of Health and Longevity: Taichi and Other Forms We will study Taichi's theory, practice its movements, explore its invisible thoughts, and read texts concerning it. The course also includes other ways to health and longevity, such as traditional mind-breath meditation and other forms. This course stresses not only mental and physical well-being but also the philosophical roots of health and wisdom formulated in Chinese classics. All readings in English translation. No prerequisites. 6 cr., S/CR/NC, AL, RAD, Not offered in 2006-2007.

CHIN 204, 205. Intermediate Chinese Equal emphasis on the development of the four skills: reading, writing, speaking, and listening comprehension, with special attention to activization. The college language requirement is met in Chinese with the completion of Chinese 205. 6 cr., ND, Fall,WinterStaff

CHIN 206. Chinese in Cultural Context This course advances students' proficiency in oral and written Chinese, at the same time integrating elements of traditional Chinese civilization and modern Chinese society. Emphasis is on cultural understanding and appropriate language use. Prerequisite: Chinese 205 or the equivalent. 6 cr., ND, SpringLiu, Ruby

CHIN 207. Tianjin Program: Intermediate Chinese Language This course builds oral and written proficiency, emphasizing expressive ability, accuracy of grammar, and pronunciation. Students learn to read, write, and speak Chinese inside and outside of the classroom. Prerequisite: Chinese 103 or the equivalent. 9 cr., ND, FallQ. Zhao

CHIN 212. Tianjin Program: Chinese Culture Local masters will teach Chinese calligraphy, art, Peking opera, Taichi, and/or other martial arts to students, immersing them in the Chinese artistic and spiritual world. 3 cr., S/CR/NC, AL, FallQ. Zhao

CHIN 235. Beauty, Good, and Evil in Chinese Literature in Translation This course will focus on the themes of beauty, good, and evil in some well-known Tang and Song poems and tales, and modern short fiction by Lu Xun, Lao She, and other writers. The course will explore both modern and classical Chinese in its cultural and historical context. All readings in English translation. No prerequisites. 6 cr., AL, RAD, Not offered in 2006-2007.

CHIN 241. Twentieth Century Chinese Literature and Film in Translation The course examines the literary legacy of May 4th writers, such as Lu Xun, Sheng Congwen, Ding Ling, and their impact on contemporary writers, especially on writers creating after the June 4th event. Themes include: cultural cannibalism, imaginary nostalgia, female subjectivity, and historical/dehistoricized violence. Chinese films (from the first to the sixth generation) were selected to match the thematic concerns of the literature. In English translation. 6 cr., AL, RAD, WinterH. Zeng

CHIN 250. Contemporary Chinese Literature and Film in Translation This course studies various currents of contemporary Chinese literature since the Cultural Revolution. Works include prose and poetry of representative writers from Literature of Rightists, Literature of the Wounded, Literature of Re-educated Youth, Misty Poetry, Root-searching Literature, Avant-garde Fiction, New Realism and works of women writers. It will also study Chinese films from the fourth generation on to New Wave and post New Wave films. Historical motivation, ideological assertion, literary influence (both Chinese and Western), and stylistic experiments of writers are examined. The literary works and films are matched for overlapping thematic concern, stylistic affinity or source of adaptation. Readings are in English translation. 6 cr., AL, Not offered in 2006-2007.

CHIN 282. Tianjin Program: Chinese Civilization This lecture course includes a general introduction to Chinese literature, history, geography, and society. It examines the social, ideological, and literary basis of Chinese civilization and society. The course will be conducted in English accompanied by some Chinese vocabulary with its English translation. 6 cr., AL, RAD, FallQ. Zhao

CHIN 307. Tianjin Program: Advanced Chinese Language This course builds oral and written proficiency, emphasizing expressive ability, accuracy of grammar, and pronunciation. Students learn to read, write, and speak Chinese inside and outside of the classroom. 9 cr., ND, FallQ. Zhao

CHIN 345. Advanced Readings in Chinese Literature: Selected Prose Introduction to well-known modern Chinese prose in the original, with exposure to a variety of themes, genres, and styles. Critical reading, writing, and discussion. Prerequisite: Chinese 206 or the equivalent. 6 cr., AL, Not offered in 2006-2007.

CHIN 346. Advanced Readings in Chinese Fiction Readings from well-known writers such as Ba Jin, Lao She, Lu Xun, Cao Xueqin and contemporary authors. The course will expose students to excerpts from modern Chinese novels and short stories. Emphasis on reading, writing, and speaking. Some practice in discussion, translation, review, literary criticism and dramatization. Some readings of classical fiction and other genres like essays and poetry will be included. Prerequisite: Chinese 206 or the equivalent. 6 cr., AL, Not offered in 2006-2007.

CHIN 347. Advanced Readings in Contemporary Chinese Prose: Newspapers Readings from PRC and Taiwan newspapers will expose students to formal written Chinese. Emphasis is on vocabulary expansion, text comprehension strategies, and differences between colloquial and written usage. Active use of the language (including oral discussion and regular written compositions) will be stressed. Prerequisite: Chinese 206 or the equivalent. 6 cr., AL, FallM. Hansell

CHIN 348. Advanced Chinese: The Mass Media This conversation and composition course will be centered around a Chinese feature film, with additional materials including TV shows, TV commercials, and written materials. Emphasis will be on culturally appropriate language use, and on discussion of the social issues that are implicitly and explicitly addressed on the Chinese-language media. 6 cr., AL, Not offered in 2006-2007.

CHIN 349. Advanced Chinese: Social Commentary This course will focus on increasing students' ability to read, write, and speak about contemporary social issues through readings, essay writing, oral presentations, and class discussion. Readings will be from leading twentieth century Chinese reformers and social critics. 6 cr., AL, Not offered in 2006-2007.

CHIN 350. Advanced Chinese: Poems and Stories Introduction to traditional and modern Chinese poems and short stories. The most beautiful poems ever written by the Chinese language help students to experience beauty, inspiration, and emotional purification. Selected stories read and discussed in detail will advance students' proficiency in oral and written Chinese. 6 cr., AL, SpringQ. Zhao

CHIN 355. Contemporary Chinese Short Stories and Films An advanced Chinese language course that will introduce contemporary short stories and films in the orginal language. The selected stories represent the writing styles of some well-known contemporary Chinese writers such as Yu Hua, Su Tong, Wang Meng, Liang Sizosheng, and Wang Anyi. The selected films were mainly directed by the acclaimed fifth generation film directors such as Cheng Kaige and Zhang Yimou. The historical, cultural and literary forces that shape these creations will be examined. 6 cr., AL, Not offered in 2006-2007.

CHIN 356. Modern and Contemporary Women Writers The course materials encompass the extremely diverse beauty of prose works and poetry by representative modern and contemporary Chinese women writers, including Zhang Ailing, Ding Ling, Xiao Hong, Shu Ting, Huo Yongming, Yi Lei, Wang Anyi, Li Ang, Can Xue, Lin Bai, Chen Ran, and Hai Nan. Historical condition, female subjectivity and modes of expression, literary heritage and innovation are examined. This is an advanced language course and includes films concerned with female lives. Prerequisite: Chinese 206 or equivalent. 6 cr., AL, Not offered in 2006-2007.

CHIN 357. Advanced Chinese: Contemporary Social Issues This is an advanced Chinese language course, employing multimedia materials (texts and documentary movie) on the most debated social issues of contemporary China: self-owned enterprises, single child policy, the education of children, status of modern women, economic and political reform. Debate, discussion and composition will provide ample opportunity for improving spoken and written Chinese. Cultural materials will bring students immediate contact with the contemporary China scene, and the ways in which people speak in real life in China today. 6 cr., AL, WinterH. Zeng

CHIN 360. Classical Chinese Classical Chinese dominated traditional Chinese culture with its concise grammar, powerful rhetoric, and graceful rhythm. It represents the dignity and glory of an enduring civilization of 5,000 years. Far from being dead, Classical Chinese is frequently referred to and quoted in modern Chinese texts. We will read the elegant essays, wise fables and charming poems written by Confucian masters, Taoist philosophers, and traditional poets. The class will pay attention to the modern application of classical Chinese. We will proceed slowly and thoroughly, immersing ourselves in words that are stronger than swords. Prerequisite: Chinese 206 or equivalent. 6 cr., AL, Not offered in 2006-2007.

Japanese Courses (JAPN)

JAPN 101, 102, 103. Elementary Japanese Introduction to the Japanese sentence structure and writing system, together with the development of basic aural/oral skills, with attention to cultural context. 6 cr., ND, Fall,Winter,SpringM. Kaga, N. Tomonari

JAPN 204, 205, 206. Intermediate Japanese Emphasis is on the development of reading skills, especially the mastery of kanji, with some work on spoken Japanese through the use of audiovisual materials. The college language requirement is met in Japanese with the completion of Japanese 205. Japanese 206 focuses on polishing and refining basic survival skills in Japanese. 6 cr., ND, Fall,Winter,SpringK. Sparling, N. Tomonari

JAPN 230. Topics in Pre-Modern Literature in Translation A topical focus on Japanese poetry and prose from different ages before 1868, with attention to literary, aesthetic, and cultural tradition, and to the relationship between text and society. Consideration of reading strategies appropriate to Japanese literature in translation, and some inquiry into the art and the process of literary translation. 6 cr., AL, Not offered in 2006-2007.

JAPN 231. Japanese Cinema in Translation This course examines the extraordinary achievement of Japanese cinema, from the classic films of Mizoguchi, Ozu, and Kurosawa to the pop cinema of Kitano and the phenomenon of anime. The films will be studied for their aesthetic, cultural, and auteur contexts. Particular attention will be paid to the relationship of the film to traditional arts, culture and society. This course is conducted in English and all the course materials are in English translation or in English subtitles. 6 cr., AL, RAD, SpringN. Tomonari

JAPN 232. Autobiography in Modern Japan in Translation This course examines a variety of Japanese self-narratives from the early modern years to the present. The main texts include Japanese autobiographies as well as background readings that situate the autobiographies in the cultural milieu. We focus largely on the social, historical and economic aspects of the Japanese autobiographies, and discuss their significance. In addition, some texts of oral history that take the form of first-person narratives are explored, in order to make further enquiry into various autobiographical representations of the self, class, gender, ethnicity, and society in Japan. 6 cr., AL, RAD, WinterN. Tomonari

JAPN 236. Classical Japanese Fiction: The Tale of Genji and Its World in Translation A close look at the great classic of Japanese fiction, with special attention to literary and aesthetic traditions and to the social and cultural context of Heian Japan. 6 cr., AL, SpringK. Sparling

JAPN 237. Literature and Arts of Japan: 1333-1868 in Translation Introduction to the poetry, drama, and fiction of two contrasting eras. From the Muromachi culture, centering on Kyoto and permeated by the aesthetics of Zen Buddhism, the course will examine Noh drama, linked poetry, ink painting, tea ceremony, and garden architecture; from the vibrant, irreverent, urban culture of Edo, centering on Osaka and what is now Tokyo, it will focus on the kabuki and puppet theaters, haiku, comic fiction, and the woodblock prints of the Floating World. 6 cr., AL, Not offered in 2006-2007.

JAPN 240. Literature and Society of Modern Japan in Translation In this course we will look at some canonical works of modern Japanese literature in translation such as those by Soseki, Tanizaki, and Mishima. Their works will be read in the context of Japanese modernity and the construction of the Japanese subject. The representation of society in literature will be discussed as well as the role of literature in society. We will also read contemporary works by Nakagami, Murakami, Yoshimura, and some authors writing in Okinawa in order to explore the intricate relationship between literary practice and modern Japanese society. 6 cr., AL, RAD, Not offered in 2006-2007.

JAPN 241. Contemporary and Modern Japanese Fiction in Translation This introduction to modern Japanese fiction addresses a set of novels and stories in (loosely) reverse chronological order. The goal is not to trace the development of a body of national literature but to start with the more familiar global present and move gradually backward through the twentieth century. Authors include Oe Kensaburo, Tawada Yoko, Murakami Ryu, Tsushima Yuko, Kono Taeko, and Mori Ogai. 6 cr., AL, Not offered in 2006-2007.

JAPN 242. Japanese Poetry in Translation A topical survey of Japanese poetry in English translation, beginning with earliest written history (sixth century anonymous song), ending with blank verse from the present moment, including longer poetic forms from the Manyoshu, waka in the classical tradition, linked verse, comic senryu, haiku, and sonnets and other poetry from Western traditions. Consideration will be given to the literary, aesthetic, and social contexts of Japanese poetry. We will undertake exploration and analysis of individual poems by reference to the original Japanese and to multiple translations. Special attention will be given to the practice of composition and the process of translation. 6 cr., AL, Not offered in 2006-2007.

JAPN 343. Advanced Japanese through Fiction and Film In this course we will subtitle in English language a recent Japanese film and also read the novel on which the film is based. The aims of this course are to understand Japanese spoken at a natural speed, to improve the reading skills of Japanese texts, and to comprehend some aspects of contemporary Japan. The students are expected to participate actively in the discussion of film/novel and of subtitles. Prerequisite: Japanese 206 or the equivalent. 6 cr., AL, Not offered in 2006-2007.

JAPN 344. Advanced Writing: Contemporary Prose In this class, students will learn the contemporary styles and forms of casual and formal writing, reports, short essays, etc., while they expand their knowledge of Chinese characters and idiomatic expressions. They will explore various writings with authentic materials. Prerequisite: Japanese 206 or the equivalent. 6 cr., AL, Not offered in 2006-2007.

JAPN 345. Advanced Reading in Modern Japanese Literature: The Short Story Introduction to modern Japanese short fiction in the original, with exposure to a variety of styles. Some practice in critical analysis and literary translation. Prerequisite: Japanese 206 or the equivalent. 6 cr., AL, SpringK. Sparling

JAPN 347. Advanced Reading in Contemporary Japanese Prose: Newspapers Introduction to journalistic prose styles, with attention to vocabulary and syntax peculiar to newspapers. Discussion in Japanese. Prerequisite: Japanese 206 or the equivalent. 6 cr., AL, Not offered in 2006-2007.

JAPN 348. Advanced Japanese Conversation and Composition Listening and speaking practice with emphasis on situational context and some attention to aspects of contemporary Japanese culture, using audiovisual materials. Prerequisite: Japanese 206 or the equivalent. 6 cr., AL, Not offered in 2006-2007.

JAPN 349. Advanced Readings in Contemporary Japanese Prose Reading and discussion of advanced Japanese materials. Exercise in speaking the language and in writing compositions. Prerequisite: Japanese 206 or the equivalent 6 cr., AL, FallM. Kaga

JAPN 350. Advanced Readings in Contemporary Culture Using authentic materials, we will examine various trends in contemporary Japanese society, including new music, fashion, and the lifestyle of the new generation. Sources include TV, video, music CDs, and magazines. Prerequisite: Japanese 206 or the equivalent. 6 cr., AL, Not offered in 2006-2007.

JAPN 351. Advanced Japanese through Documentary Film In this course we will subtitle in English a Japanese documentary film and also read the script and/or other related materials. The course aims to improve understanding of spoken Japanese at a natural pace, to improve the skill in reading of Japanese texts, and to comprehend some aspects of contemporary Japan. Students are expected to participate actively in the discussion of the film and the subtitles. Prerequisite: Japanese 206 or equivalent. 6 cr., AL, WinterN. Tomonari