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Political Science (POSC)

Chair: Professor Richard A. Keiser

Professors: Barbara Allen, Roy F. Grow, Richard A. Keiser, Steven E. Schier

Visiting Professor: Burton Levin

Associate Professors: Laurence D. Cooper, Brian Gregory Marfleet, Alfred P. Montero, Kimberly K. Smith

Assistant Professors: Devashree Gupta, Tun Myint, Carolyn Wong

Visiting Instructors: Christopher Heurlin, Joel Schlosser

Political science encompasses the study of governments and international organizations political behavior, public policies, political processes, systems, and theory. It includes American politics, comparative politics, political philosophy, international relations and world politics. The Department’s curriculum is designed to cultivate judicious and productive citizenship, as well as provide versatile skills and knowledge. These can be applied to a wide range of fields, including law, business, government, international service, education, journalism, and other fields.

Majors choose between two tracks: Political Science or Political Science/International Relations. Within each of these tracks, students have flexibility to plan their courses of study around subfields of interest.

Requirements for the Political Science track

Sixty-six credits, including:

1. Core Courses (18 credits) Majors are required to complete three of the following core courses prior to their senior year.

POSC 120 Comparative Political Regimes

POSC 122 Politics in America: Liberty and Equality

POSC 160 Political Philosophy

POSC 170 International Relations and World Politics

2. Methods Sequence (12 credits):

MATH 115 Introduction to Statistics or MATH 215 Introduction to Probability and Statistics (6 credits)

POSC 230: Methods of Political Research (6 credits) This course should be taken as soon as possible after declaring a major.

3. Elective Courses (30 credits in the department): At least two courses (12 credits) must be at the 300-level, and one of these two must be an asterisk * designated seminar. It is recommended that majors take their seminar course during the junior year.

A maximum of 12 credits earned on a non-Carleton off campus studies program may be granted toward the electives requirement. These credits may not be used to replace a core course and should be distinct and independent from electives offered at Carleton. The chair may require a copy of the off-campus course syllabus.

4. Integrative Exercise (6 credits total - POSC 400): During their junior or senior year students will revise substantially the final paper from an advanced seminar in political science. (Department-approved courses are designated with an asterisk*. Also see separately published list, which does not include courses taken on non-Carleton off-campus programs.)

The professor in the course will act as the student’s comps adviser. Usually revision will take place during the term following the seminar and the revision will be completed during that term. However, professors and advisees may mutually define the scope of revision. The integrative exercise will be completed with preparation of a poster for a group poster presentation.

Requirements for the Political Science/International Relations track

Coordinator: Associate Professor Alfred P. Montero

The International Relations Program was originated in 1937 by the former Secretary of State and Nobel Peace Prize winner, Frank B. Kellogg, through the establishment at Carleton of the Kellogg Foundation for Education in International Relations.

Sixty-six credits, including:

1. Core Courses (12 credits): Majors are required to complete the two core courses prior to their senior year, as listed below.

Required:

POSC 170 International Relations and World Politics

Plus one of the following:

POSC 120 Comparative Political Regimes

POSC 122 Politics in America: Liberty and Equality

POSC 160 Political Philosophy

2. Methods Sequence (12 credits):

MATH 115 Introduction to Statistics or MATH 215 Introduction to Probability and Statistics (6 credits)

POSC 230 Methods of Political Research (6 credits) This course should be taken as soon as possible after declaring a major.

3. Elective Courses (36 credits): Six courses from the following three subfield electives and area studies, subject to the following distribution requirements:

a) three of these six courses (or 18 credits) must come from the student's main subfield electives list and one (6 credits) from another subfield list.

b) One of the six courses must be a non-POSC selection

c) One of the six courses must be an area studies course (If a non-POSC course, it will also satisfy the (b) requirement.) Approved area studies courses are listed below. Area studies cannot be used as a main subfield.

d) Two of the six courses must be 300-level courses in the Political Science Department, and one of those two 300-level courses must be an asterisk * designated seminar in the student's main subfield.


It is recommended that majors take their seminar course during the junior year. A course which was listed as fulfilling the International Relations electives requirement at the time the student elected that course, but which has been deleted from the catalog simply because it has not been taught this year or last, will continue to be accepted in fulfillment of the IR requirement.


a) Leadership, Peace and Security

POSC 226 Political Psychology (not offered in 2009-2010)

POSC 229 International Institutions

POSC 239 The Diplomat's Craft: Three Case Studies

POSC 241 Ethnic Conflict (not offered in 2009-2010)

POSC 258 Politics and Ambition (not offered in 2009-2010)

POSC 259 Justice Among Nations

POSC 289, 293 Washington D.C. Program: Seminar

POSC 309 The American Presidency*

POSC 326 America's China Policy* (not offered in 2009-2010)

POSC 328 Foreign Policy Analysis*

POSC 330 The Complexity of Politics* (not offered in 2009-2010)

POSC 345 Guerillas, Warlords and Bandits: The Art of Asymmetric War* (not offered in 2009-2010)

POSC 346 Spies, Rogues and Statesmen: Intelligence and the Formation of Foreign Policy* (not offered in 2009-2010)

POSC 347 America and Its Wars*

SOAN 236 Introduction to Peace Studies

WGST 234 Feminist Theory


b) Global Development and Sustainability

ECON 240 Microeconomics of Development

ECON 241 Growth and Development (not offered in 2009-2010)

ECON 274 Labor Economics

ECON 275 Law and Economics (not offered in 2009-2010)

ECON 280 International Trade

ECON 281 International Finance (not offered in 2009-2010)

POSC 213 Labor Politics in a Global Age (not offered in 2009-2010)

POSC 224 Migration Politics: Asian American and Latino Experiences (not offered in 2009-2010)

POSC 245 Comparative Environmental Politics and Policy (not offered in 2009-2010)

POSC 253 Marxist Political Thought

POSC 263 European Political Economy (not offered in 2009-2010)

POSC 265 Politics of Global Economic Relations

POSC 266 Urban Political Economy

POSC 268 International Environmental Politics and Policies

POSC 313 Labor Politics in a Global Age* (not offered in 2009-2010)

POSC 322 Political Economy of Latin America*

POSC 333 Sustainability Science* (not offered in 2009-2010)

POSC 360 Political Economy Seminar* (not offered in 2009-2010)

POSC 361 Approaches to Development*

POSC 364 Capitalism and Its Critics* (not offered in 2009-2010)

POSC 366 Urban Political Economy*

POSC 381 Beijing Program: Politics of Economic Development (not offered in 2009-2010)

POSC 382 Beijing Program: Chinese Economics in Transition (not offered in 2009-2010)

POSC 383 Maastricht Program: Politics of the European Union (not offered in 2009-2010)

SOAN 234 Ecology, Economy, and Culture (not offered in 2009-2010)

WGST 396 Transnational Feminisms


c) Democracy, Society, and the State

POSC 201 National Policymaking (not offered in 2009-2010)

POSC 210 Politics Across Borders (not offered in 2009-2010)

POSC 219 Protest, Power & Grassroots Organizing: American Social Movements

POSC 221 Latin American Politics (not offered in 2009-2010)

POSC 233 Corruption, Authoritarianism, and Democracy

POSC 237 Southeast Asian Politics (not offered in 2009-2010)

POSC 264 China on the Rise: The Politics of Contemporary China

POSC 273 Citizen and Immigration Politics (not offered in 2009-2010)

POSC 281 Global Society: An Approach to World Politics

POSC 310 Politics Across Borders* (not offered in 2009-2010)

POSC 330 The Complexity of Politics* (not offered in 2009-2010)

POSC 332 Religion and Politics* (not offered in 2009-2010)

POSC 358 Comparative Social Movements* (not offered in 2009-2010)

POSC 362 Globalization and the State* (not offered in 2009-2010)

POSC 378 Beijing Program: Chinese Social and Political Institutions (not offered in 2009-2010)

POSC 379 Beijing Program: Chinese Decision Making (not offered in 2009-2010)

SOAN 221 Law and Society (not offered in 2009-2010)

SOAN 225 Social Movements


Approved Area Studies Courses

AMST 230 The American Sublime: Landscape, Character & National Destiny in Nineteenth Century America

ECON 233 European Economic History

ECON 236 Economics of the European Union

EUST 110 Introduction to European Studies: The Age of Cathedrals

HIST 139 Foundations of Modern Europe

HIST 140 Modern Europe 1789-1914 (not offered in 2009-2010)

HIST 141 Europe in the Twentieth Century

HIST 152 History of Imperial China

HIST 161 History of Modern India (not offered in 2009-2010)

HIST 170 Modern Latin America 1810-Present

HIST 180 An Historical Survey of East Africa

HIST 182 A Survey of Southern African History (not offered in 2009-2010)

HIST 238 Topics in Medieval History: Church, Papacy and Empire (not offered in 2009-2010)

HIST 241 Russia through Wars and Revolutions

HIST 243 The Peasants are Revolting! Society and Politics in the Making of Modern France

HIST 249 Modern Central Europe (not offered in 2009-2010)

HIST 254 Colonialism in East Asia

HIST 255 Press and Culture in East Asia

HIST 260 The Making of the Modern Middle East (not offered in 2009-2010)

HIST 262 Post-colonial South Asia, 1947-Present (not offered in 2009-2010)

HIST 267 History of Modern Turkey (not offered in 2009-2010)

HIST 272 The Emergence of Modern Mexico (not offered in 2009-2010)

HIST 278 Religious Orthodoxy and Deviance in New Spain (not offered in 2009-2010)

HIST 360 Muslims and Modernity

LTAM 200 Issues in Latin American Studies

POSC 210 Politics Across Borders (not offered in 2009-2010)

POSC 221 Latin American Politics (not offered in 2009-2010)

POSC 237 Southeast Asian Politics (not offered in 2009-2010)

POSC 264 China on the Rise: The Politics of Contemporary China

POSC 310 Politics Across Borders* (not offered in 2009-2010)

SOAN 250 Ethnography of Latin America (not offered in 2009-2010)

SOAN 256 Ethnography of Africa

SOAN 284 Anthropology of China (not offered in 2009-2010)

SOAN 286 Anthropology of East Asia (not offered in 2009-2010)


4. Integrative Exercise (Total of 6 credits - POSC 400): During their junior or senior year, students will revise substantially the final paper from an advanced seminar in international relations. (Department-approved courses are designated with an asterisk*. Also see separately published list, which does not include courses taken on non-Carleton off-campus programs.)

The professor in the course will act as the student’s comps adviser. Usually revision will take place during the term following the seminar and the revision will be completed during that term. However, professors and advisees may mutually define the scope of revision. The integrative exercise will be completed with preparation of a poster for a group poster presentation.

5. Study Abroad: We recommend study in a Carleton College Off-Campus or non-Carleton program that includes a significant political component. This may include study in our Beijing or Maastricht programs, or the Washington D.C. program, especially if the internship taken during the Washington program includes an international organization issue.

A maximum of 12 credits earned on a non-Carleton off campus studies program may be granted toward the electives requirement. These credits may not be used to replace a core course and should be distinct and independent from electives offered at Carleton. The chair may require a copy of the off-campus course syllabus.

Political Science and International Relations Courses

POSC 120. Comparative Political Regimes An introduction to the fundamentals of government and the variety of ways politics is practiced in different countries. Capitalist democracies, transitional states and developing nations are compared. 6 cr., SS, Fall,WinterC. Heurlin, A. Montero

POSC 122. Politics in America: Liberty and Equality An introduction to American government and politics. Focus on the Congress, Presidency, political parties and interest groups, the courts and the Constitution. Particular attention will be given to the public policy debates that divide liberals and conservatives and how these divisions are rooted in American political culture. 6 cr., SS, Fall,Winter,SpringR. Keiser, S. Schier

POSC 160. Political Philosophy Introduction to ancient and modern political philosophy. We will investigate several fundamentally different approaches to the basic questions of politics--­questions concerning the character of political life, the possibilities and limits of politics, justice, and the good society--­and the philosophic presuppositions (concerning human nature and human flourishing) that underlie these, and all, political questions. 6 cr., SS, Fall,Winter,SpringL. Cooper, J. Schlosser, K. Smith

POSC 170. International Relations and World Politics A survey of factors in international relations of a geopolitical, commercial and ideological character; systems of international relations, including bipolar deterrence, polycentrism, and international organization; and dynamics of international relations, including war, diplomacy, and international economic and social development. 6 cr., SS, Winter,SpringR. Grow, T. Myint

POSC 201. National Policymaking This course will examine how and by whom ideas are brought to the national political agenda and how they are kept off, the processes by which policy solutions are considered, the formulation of legislation and the reasons for success and failure, and policy implementation. We will mix theory with a variety of policy case studies, such as tax reform policy and health care policy. Prerequisite: Political Science 122 or sophomore standing. 6 cr., SS, Not offered in 2009-2010.

POSC 203. Political Communication: Election Campaign Advertising and Public Opinion* Cross-listed with POSC 303. How does political advertising influence the electorate? Do "negative ads" turn voters off? Can advertising be used strategically to influence turnout, decreasing the participation of one of the major parties, while increasing the likelihood that others will vote? Election ads along with the six second "sound bite" are now among the major forms of political communication in modern democracies. We will study how ads are created and "work" from the standpoint of political psychology and film analysis. The course includes a research experience. 6 cr., SS, FallB. Allen

POSC 204. Media and American Politics: Special Election Edition Our analysis of media influences on politics will draw from three fields of study: political psychology, political behavior and participation, and public opinion. Students will conduct a study of the effects of campaign ads and news in election 2008 using content analysis and other research methods. Students interested in further political analysis should also take POSC 230 special version (Marfleet) same term. 6 cr., SS, Not offered in 2009-2010.

POSC 205. Issues in American Democracy Is direct citizen rule through participatory democracy or a reliance on policymaking by officeholders the best way to govern America? This seminar addresses the question by examining several topics--the levels of political knowledge and interest among the public, the impact of interest groups in national government, and the operation of popular rule through initiatives and referendums in American states. 6 cr., SS, Not offered in 2009-2010.

POSC 206. The American Courts We will explore the political and institutional dimensions of courts, and consider whether and how judicial decision making differs from political decision making. Topics will include legal reasoning and the role of the judge, the institutional capacity of courts and their relation to the political branches, and the role of lawyers in the political system. 6 cr., SS, Not offered in 2009-2010.

POSC 207. Urban Politics in a Global Era Are cities microcosms of state or nation? How has the role of immigrant-port-of-entry affected the politics of cities? What has been the impact of population shift to the suburbs? Are African-Americans and Latinos fighting over an inconsequential hole-in-the-doughnut in Chicago and Los Angeles? What is the significance of living wage and gay rights movements in cities? Why do European and American cities seem so different, and are there signs of convergence in the era of globalization? 6 cr., SS, FallR. Keiser

POSC 209. The Power of Citizenship: Neighborhood Mobilization Neighborhood-based community organizing can be an effective form of action for citizens at the same time that it reinvigorates democratic practices. In this course we will explore concepts of democracy, power and identity as we examine cases of community organizing in the U.S. When and why do people in a neighborhood come together to take political action? What are the obstacles to community-based political action? What are its limits? Possibilities? What is the role of experts? What should it be? What about the role of government? How do governmental structures, particular circumstances, and social expectations interact? 6 cr., SS, WinterP. Cavanaugh

POSC 210. Politics Across Borders Cross-listed with POSC 310. We live in an age of interdependent national economies. The costs of international travel and communication have declined in recent decades. Do the international political economy and modern technology make it easier for political actors in civil society to extend the reach of their influence across borders? Does the transmission of cultural ideas and practices across borders change the nature of domestic politics? In examining these questions, we will pay particular attention to the politics of human rights, migration, refugees, and labor in the advanced industrial democracies. 6 cr., SS, Not offered in 2009-2010.

POSC 211. Environment and the Evolution of Rules: Designing Institutions to Solve Political Problems How can we design democratic institutions to deal with environmental and social problems? Are there universal approaches to solving political problems in physically and socially diverse communities? Do people come up with different institutional ways to address shared problems because of environmental or cultural differences? By examining basic principles of institutional design you will learn how to analyze constitutions, public policies, international treaties, and other "rule ordered relationships" that different people have created to deal with environmental concerns and, generally, the health and welfare of their communities. 6 cr., SS, Not offered in 2009-2010.

POSC 213. Labor Politics in a Global Age Cross-listed with POSC 313. How are American unions coping with globalization? As capital mobility puts growing pressures on unions, how are U.S. labor institutions changing at the national, local, and workplace level? The course compares wage-bargaining institutions and the political representation of unionized labor in North America, Western Europe, and East Asia. Topics include the politics of job loss; the informal economy; gendered labor; and the stance of unions on issues of migration and race. 6 cr., SS, Not offered in 2009-2010.

POSC 214. Visual Representations of Political Thought and Action Visual media offer an alternative method of framing political ideas and events. Images found in such texts as film, posters, and even in statistical tables can enlighten--or mislead. Readings in visual theory, political psychology, and graphic representation will enable you to read images and use these powerful media to convey your ideas and research. 3 cr., SS, Not offered in 2009-2010.

POSC 216. The Initiative, Referendum and Public Policy Cross-listed with POSC.316. This course focuses on the direct democracy tools of initiative and referendum. What are the origins of these institutions and in what historical circumstances do citizens turn to them? Policy conflicts over gay marriage, regulation of tobacco, financing of sports stadiums, and the externalities of economic development will be among our topics. 6 cr., SS, FallR. Keiser

POSC 219. Protest, Power & Grassroots Organizing: American Social Movements Why do protest movements form and who joins? How do grassroots movements achieve their aims? This class examines the strategies of grassroots political actors as they organize protest movements in civil society, forge coalitions, and give a voice to the voiceless. Comparisons are drawn between the U.S., European, Asian, and Latin American experiences. 6 cr., SS, WinterC. Huerlin

POSC 220. Politics and Political History in Film How do representations of politics in film influence our ideas about governance, citizenship, power, and authority? How do film and TV reflect values and beliefs of democratic society, particularly in the United States? These are two questions that we will consider in the course as we study films representing politics and historical events in fiction and non-fiction genres for entertainment and education. Films to be analyzed include: Battle of Algiers, Fog of War, Cape Fear (1963), Manchurian Candidate (1960), Advise and Consent, All the President’s Men, Primary, War Room, The Mushroom Club, Fahrenheit 9/11, When the Levees Broke. 6 cr., SS, Not offered in 2009-2010.

POSC 221. Latin American Politics Comparative study of political institutions and conflicts in selected Latin American countries. Attention is focused on general problems and patterns of development, with some emphasis on U.S.-Latin American relations. 6 cr., SS, Not offered in 2009-2010.

POSC 222. The Politics of Food: Producers, Consumers and Citizenship Although what we eat everyday is familiar and biologically intimate, it is also a part of a complex political system. In this course we will learn about and reflect upon the political aspects of food in the U.S. Topics include food history, agribusiness, local food movements, food policy, and social justice. What influences the way we eat? How did ignorance about food become the norm in the U.S.? The course will include guest speakers and possibly field trips. 6 cr., SS, SpringP. Cavanaugh

POSC 224. Migration Politics: Asian American and Latino Experiences Exploration of forces that shape U.S. immigration and refugee policy. How do politics centered on economic interest and identity politics interact in the making of immigration policy? Do powerful business interests mainly determine the vicissitudes of immigration policy? Or do naturalized immigrant voters, organized ethnic groups and grassroots movements for immigrant rights play an important role? Comparison of experiences of entry, exclusion, and incorporation of Hmong, Vietnamese, Chinese, Indian, Mexican, and Salvadoran migrants. 6 cr., SS, Not offered in 2009-2010.

POSC 226. Political Psychology This course is an introduction to political psychology, an inter-disciplinary field of study that applies psychological theory and research to the study of politics, as a theoretical alternative to rational choice models. Study will include applying psychological models to elite decision making and to political behavior of ordinary citizens. Topics include personality and political leadership, group processes and foreign policy, theories of information processing and elite decision making, malignant political aggression and punitive politics, altruism and heroic political action, etc. in light of important political issues and events. 6 cr., SS, Not offered in 2009-2010.

POSC 227. Agenda Setting through Speeches and Debates

Can political speeches like the State of the Union Address really set the agenda for the Congress and the country? How do election campaign speeches set an agenda and control the discourse among journalists, citizens, and candidate? What about campaign debates? Do they set an agenda for candidate and country? What do debates and speeches reveal about the political psychology of candidates and office holders: about how they process information and make decisions. These are a few of the questions we will address in our survey of political psychology and communication literature. 6 cr., SS, WinterB. Allen

POSC 229. International Institutions Intergovernmental organizations (IGOs), nongovernmental organizations (NGOs), and citizens are all entities that shape the governance of international and global issues. This course focuses on both international organizations (IOs) and international institutions that include formal treaties and informal rules, norms, and strategies. We will study key theoretical concepts and analytical frameworks through case studies and the literature on formal organization and collective action. 6 cr., SS, FallT. Myint

POSC 230. Methods of Political Research An introduction to research method, research design, and the analysis of political data. The course is intended to introduce students to the fundamentals of scientific inquiry as they are employed in the discipline. The course will consider the philosophy of scientific research generally, the philosophy of social science research, theory building and theory testing, the components of applied (quantitative and qualitative) research across the major sub-fields of political science, and basic methodological tools. Intended for majors only. Prerequisite: Mathematics 115 or 215. 6 cr., ND, Fall,SpringG. Marfleet

POSC 231. American Foreign Policy An introduction to the actors and processes of American foreign policymaking and to the substance of American foreign policy. The course aims to provide students with an understanding of how knowledge of the past, the global policy environment, the processes of foreign policymaking, and the specifics of a foreign policy issue come together to help determine modern American foreign policy. The course will review the structure of the international system of states, state power and interests, the historical context of American foreign policy, actors in American foreign affairs, models of foreign policy decision making, and the instruments of foreign policy. Prerequisite: Political Science 122 highly recommended. 6 cr., SS, Not offered in 2009-2010.

POSC 233. Corruption, Authoritarianism, and Democracy After three decades of democratization, most countries are democratic. But the quality of these democracies is questionable as many suffer from continuous problems of corruption, poor elite accountability, human rights violations, and even policies that can only be described as semi-authoritarian. This course investigates the classic regime types (totalitarianism, authoritarianism, democracy), transitions between them, and the problems of deviations from democratic norms and processes. Special attention will be paid to problems of democratic governance such as electoral fraud, campaign finance malfeasance, the corruption of the judiciary, political violence, and violations of human and civil rights. 6 cr., SS, SpringA. Montero

POSC 237. Southeast Asian Politics This course will cover key thematic issues of Southeast Asian politics, including the challenges of democracy, regional integration, environmental politics, the rise of the power of non-state actors, and struggles for citizen-sovereignty of the people. We will examine these frontier issues against the background of Southeast Asia’s societal evolution through kingdoms, colonial eras, emergence of nation-states, and the influence of globalization on politics. 6 cr., SS, Not offered in 2009-2010.

POSC 239. The Diplomat's Craft: Three Case Studies Diplomacy is the means by which states find common ground and resolve differences. Former ambassador Burt Levin uses three cases studies from his career to evaluate the relationships between diplomacy and policy implementation. 3 cr., SS, SpringB. Levin

POSC 241. Ethnic Conflict Ethnic conflict is a persistent and troubling challenge for those interested in preserving international peace and stability. By one account, ethnic violence has claimed more than ten million lives since 1945, and in the 1990s, ethnic conflicts comprised nearly half of all ongoing conflicts around the world. In this course, we will attempt to understand the conditions that contribute to ethnic tensions, identify the triggers that lead to escalation, and evaluate alternative ideas for managing and solving such disputes. The course will draw on a number of cases, including Rwanda, Bosnia, and Northern Ireland. 6 cr., SS, Not offered in 2009-2010.

POSC 245. Comparative Environmental Politics and Policy Environmental politics and policy can differ significantly in different national contexts. When countries take divergent approaches to defining and addressing environmental problems, it can lead to tensions at the international level. We will compare national approaches to environmental politics and policymaking, exploring the impact of institutions, culture, economic interests and the historical development of national environmental and other civil society movements on these processes. 6 cr., SS, Not offered in 2009-2010.

POSC 247. Comparative Nationalism Nationalism is an ideology that political actors have frequently harnessed to support a wide variety of policies ranging from intensive economic development to genocide. But what is nationalism? Where does it come from? And what gives it such emotional and political power? This course investigates competing ideas about the sources of nationalism, its evolution, and its political uses in state building, legitimation, development, and war. We will consider both historic examples of nationalism, as well as contemporary cases drawn from Europe, the Middle East, Asia, and the United States. 6 cr., SS, Not offered in 2009-2010.

POSC 250. Ancient Political Philosophy In this course we will examine ancient political philosophy through the intensive study of Plato's Republic, perhaps the greatest work of political philosophy ever written. What is morality? Why should a person behave morally? Wouldn't it be more satisfying to be a tyrant? What is the best way of life? What would a perfect society look like? What would be its customs and institutions, and who would rule? What would it demand of us, and would that price be worth paying? These are some of the politically (and personally) vital questions addressed by the book. 6 cr., SS, Not offered in 2009-2010.

POSC 251. Modern Political Philosophy Modern political philosophy initiated many of the ways of thinking about politics that remain salient today: balancing individuality and community; negotiating liberty and equality; and questioning the relationship of politics and morality. In this course we will focus on the Continental tradition of modern political philosophy from Kant to Hegel to Marx, which has had particular influence on politics and culture in Europe, Latin America, and China. 6 cr., SS, WinterJ. Schlosser

POSC 253. Marxist Political Thought A discussion seminar introducing the economic and political themes in Marxist literature, concentrating on the works of Marx, Engels, Lenin, and Mao. The course looks at theories of economic development, the role of the state, social conflict, political action, and revolution in the writings of each of these thinkers. 6 cr., SS, SpringR. Grow

POSC 257. American Environmental Thought The development of American thinking about nature and humanity's relationship to it covering from the nineteenth century to the present. Representative figures include Henry David Thoreau, John Muir, Aldo Leopold, Rachel Carson, and Barry Commoner. 6 cr., SS, Not offered in 2009-2010.

POSC 258. Politics and Ambition Is personal ambition a threat to peace and the public good or is it a prod to nobility and heroism? Does it exemplify the opposition between self and society or does it represent their intersection and mutual support­or both? Drawing on literary, philosophical, and historical works this course will take up these and other questions as part of a broad examination of the role of ambition in politics. 6 cr., SS, Not offered in 2009-2010.

POSC 259. Justice Among Nations This course will bring classic works of political philosophy into conversation with the central questions of international relations, questions concerning both the moral basis of power and the character of international politics. Using the thought of Thucydides and Herodotus as our starting point, we will think through problems of contemporary international relations theory in light of these earlier thinkers, attempting to use the lucid thinking of the past to illuminate the present. 6 cr., SS, SpringJ. Schlosser

POSC 260. The Political Philosophy of Jean-Jacques Rousseau In this course we will study what Rousseau considered his greatest and best book: Emile. Emile is a philosophic novel. It uses a thought experiment--the rearing of a child from infancy to adulthood--to explore human nature and the human condition, including their political dimensions. Among Emile’s themes are natural goodness and the origins of evil; self-love and sociability; the differences and relations between the sexes; citizenship; and the principles of political right. The book also addresses the question of how one might live naturally and happily amid an unnatural and unhappy civilization. 6 cr., SS, Not offered in 2009-2010.

POSC 263. European Political Economy An introduction to the politics of the European region during the post-World War II period. Students will examine the political conditions that gave impetus to the creation, maintenance, crisis, and decline of Keynesian economic policies, social welfare states, social democratic partisan alliances, and cooperative patterns of industrial relations. The course will examine the rise and reform of the project of European integration. The course will also address the particular problems faced by the East European countries as they attempt to make a transition from authoritarian, command economies to democratic, market-based economies. 6 cr., SS, Not offered in 2009-2010.

POSC 264. China on the Rise: The Politics of Contemporary China This course examines the political, social and economic transformation of China over the past thirty years. Students will explore the transformation of the countryside from a primarily agricultural society into the factory of the world. Particular emphasis will be placed on economic development and how this has changed state-society relations at the grassroots. The class will explore these changes among farmers, the working class and the emerging middle class. Students will also explore how the Chinese Communist Party has survived and even thrived while many other Communist regimes have fallen and assess the relationship between economic development and democratization. 6 cr., SS, FallC. Heurlin

POSC 265. Politics of Global Economic Relations This course examines the interaction of national politics and international economic activity. Topics include the relationship between national and international finance, global competitiveness, and economic development. Case studies drawn from every continent. 6 cr., SS, WinterA. Montero

POSC 266. Urban Political Economy Cross-listed with POSC.366. City revenue is increasingly dependent on tourism. Cities manufacture identity and entertainment, whether we think of Las Vegas or Jerusalem, Berlin or Bilbao, the ethnoscapes of Copenhagen or the red light district of Amsterdam. As cities compete in the global economy to become playgrounds for a transnational tourist class, what is the role of urban residents? Who governs? Who benefits? Short essays or exams will be required. 6 cr., SS, WinterR. Keiser

POSC 268. International Environmental Politics and Policies International environmental politics and policy is the most prominent field that challenges traditional state-centric ways of thinking about international problems and solutions. This course will cover five arenas crucial to understanding the nature and origin of international environmental problems and policymaking mechanisms: (1) international environmental law; (2) international political orders; (3) human-environment interactions through politics and markets; (4) paradigms of sustainable development; and (5) dynamics of human values and rules. 6 cr., SS, FallT. Myint

POSC 271. Constitutional Law I Covers American constitutional law and history from the founding to the breakdown of the constitution in secession crisis. Extensive attention will be paid to the constitutional convention and other sources of constitutional law in addition to Supreme Court cases. 6 cr., SS, FallK. Smith

POSC 272. Constitutional Law II Covers American constitutional law and history from Reconstruction to the contemporary era. Extensive attention will be paid to the effort to refound the American constitution following the Civil War as manifest in the 13th, 14th, and 15th amendments, and to the successive transformations which the Supreme Court worked in the new constitutional order. Political Science 271 is not a prerequisite. 6 cr., SS, WinterK. Smith

POSC 273. Citizen and Immigration Politics This course examines the politics of citizenship and immigration policy in the United States from a comparative perspective. In addition, to the U.S. case, the class also examines policy in Australia, Britain, Canada, France, and Germany. What foundational political ideals and traditions shape a nation's laws on citizenship and immigration? How do public opinion, political elites, and interest groups affect the path of immigration controversy over time? What effect do national political institutions have on policy-making? In what ways do domestic and foreign policy concerns interact? As more immigrants become citizens, how does their voice and participation alter the public discourse and politics of immigration? 6 cr., SS, Not offered in 2009-2010.

POSC 275. Identity Politics in America: Ethnicity, Gender, Religion This class explores the goals, forms, and impact of identity politics in America. Groups engage in identity politics when their members collectively strive for recognition for the group's particular culture, history, language, or identity. How do movements concerned with recognition of particular groups define "insiders" and relate to "outsiders"? How do groups define a group interest when memberships are heterogeneous and individuals hold multiple group memberships? To what extent do race-ethnicity, gender, and religion shape people's outlook, values, and political choices in the United States? 6 cr., SS, Not offered in 2009-2010.

POSC 281. Global Society: An Approach to World Politics One of the features of the Post-Cold War world has been the increased salience of issues such as terrorism, the environment, the influence of transnational corporations, the world-wide AIDS epidemic, the drug trade, and the crisis of refugees. The proliferation of such problems illustrates the limitations of state-centric international relations theory. This course examines new theoretical approaches to global politics that seek to understand how non-state actors and structures influence emerging patterns of global governance. We will debate as a class the extent to which a global society approach to world politics helps us to understand these transnational problems. 6 cr., SS, WinterB. Allen

POSC 289, 293. Washington D.C. Program: Seminar A study of national and international political institutions and processes conducted in Washington, D.C. Seminar participants include national and international reporters, foreign diplomats, members of Congress, career civil servants, White House staff, political party leaders, and interest group representatives. Program participants will also earn four credits from directed reading during the winter break and six credits from a Washington internship, and six credits for the seminar during winter term. Senior political science majors may elect to take this seminar as a 3 credit course along with 3 credits of comps. (293 S/CR/NC) 9 or 12 cr., S/CR/NC, SS, WinterS. Schier

POSC 303. Political Communication: Election Campaign Advertising and Public Opinion* Cross-listed with POSC 203. How does political advertising influence the electorate? Do "negative ads" turn voters off? Can advertising be used strategically to influence turnout, decreasing the participation of one of the major parties, while increasing the likelihood that others will vote? Election ads along with the six second "sound bite" are now among the major forms of political communication in modern democracies. We will study how ads are created and "work" from the standpoint of political psychology and film analysis. The course includes a research component and students enrolled at the 300 level will conduct more extensive analysis of data for their seminar papers. 6 cr., SS, FallB. Allen

POSC 305. Issues in American Democracy* Is direct citizen rule through participatory democracy or a reliance on policymaking by officeholders the best way to govern America? This seminar addresses the question by examining several topics--the levels of political knowledge and interest among the public, the impact of interest groups in national government, and the operation of popular rule through initiatives and referendums in American states. 6 cr., SS, Not offered in 2009-2010.

POSC 306. How Race Matters in American Politics* How do the politics of race and ethnicity influence the modern development of American democracy? Problems of inequality and social marginalization. Racial attitudes and progress toward equality from the civil rights movement of the 1960s to the present. The relationship between protest and electoral politics in African American, Latino, and Asian American communities. Mechanisms for representation of racial-ethnic minorities at the national, state, and local levels of government. Controversies over racial-ethnic policy, such as affirmative action and bilingual education. 6 cr., SS, RAD, Not offered in 2009-2010.

POSC 308. Poverty and Public Policy* This course will focus on the causes of urban poverty in the United States and the public policy strategies at the state and federal levels for reducing poverty. 6 cr., SS, Not offered in 2009-2010.

POSC 309. The American Presidency* A study of the contemporary Presidency, with a focus on the development of the institutional Presidency, presidential personality and the presidency's relations with other structures in the American political system. The equivalent of a large research paper will be among the requirements for this course. 6 cr., SS, FallS. Schier

POSC 310. Politics Across Borders* Cross-listed with POSC.210. We live in an age of interdependent national economies. The costs of international travel and communication have declined in recent decades. Do the international political economy and modern technology make it easier for political actors in civil society to extend the reach of their influence across borders? Does the transmission of cultural ideas and practices across borders change the nature of domestic politics? In examining these questions, we will pay particular attention to the politics of human rights, migration, refugees, and labor in the advanced industrial democracies. 6 cr., SS, Not offered in 2009-2010.

POSC 311. Topics in Constitutional Law* This seminar will explore selected themes in constitutional law, examining the historical development of doctrine, the philosophical issues raised by the issues and the contemporary political controversies surrounding the Court's decisions. Topics may include the separation of church and state, freedom of speech, reproductive rights, criminal justice, voting rights, and gender and sexuality in the law. Prerequisite: One of the following: Political Science 206, 270, 271. 6 cr., SS, SpringK. Smith

POSC 313. Labor Politics in a Global Age* Cross-listed with POSC 213. How are American unions coping with globalization? As capital mobility puts growing pressures on unions, how are U.S. labor institutions changing at the national, local, and workplace level? The course compares wage--bargaining institutions and the political representation of unionized labor in North America, Western Europe, and East Asia. Topics include the politics of job loss; the informal economy; gendered labor; and the stance of unions on issues of migration and race. 6 cr., SS, Not offered in 2009-2010.

POSC 316. The Initiative, Referendum and Public Policy* Cross-listed with POSC.216. This course focuses on the direct democracy tools of initiative and referendum. What are the origins of these institutions and in what historical circumstances do citizens turn to them? Policy conflicts over gay marriage, regulation of tobacco, financing of sports stadiums, and the externalities of economic development will be among our topics. Students will be required to write a research paper. 6 cr., SS, SpringR. Keiser

POSC 322. Political Economy of Latin America* A research seminar that focuses on politics and economic development Latin America. Topics include: macroeconomic crisis and industrialization, poverty and inequality, regional integration, state reform and decentralization. Students work on individual research projects of their choosing. 6 cr., SS, FallA. Montero

POSC 326. America's China Policy* This course examines the factors that shape United States policies toward China. Topics include the early relationships in the 1800s, the problems of the war years, and the strains of the People's Republic era. 6 cr., SS, Not offered in 2009-2010.

POSC 328. Foreign Policy Analysis* Foreign policy analysis is a distinct sub-field within international relations that focuses on explaining the actions and choices of actors in world politics. After a review of the historical development of the sub-field, we will explore approaches to foreign policy that emphasize the empirical testing of hypotheses that explain how policies and choices are formulated and implemented. The psychological sources of foreign policy decisions (including leaders' beliefs and personalities and the effect of decision-making groups) are a central theme. Completion of a lower level IR course and the stats/methods sequence is recommended. 6 cr., SS, WinterG. Marfleet

POSC 329. Vietnam, Iraq, and American Policy* This course will examine and compare the factors which led to America's involvement in the Vietnam War of the 1960’s and the Iraq War that began in 2003. Discussions will focus on the domestic and foreign policy issues that shaped American public perceptions, and investigate both government policies and military strategies. The class will also discuss the impact of both conflicts on the course of American foreign policy. 6 cr., SS, Not offered in 2009-2010.

POSC 330. The Complexity of Politics* Theories of complexity and emergence relate to how large-scale collective properties and characteristics of a system can arise from the behavior and attributes of component parts. This course explores the relevance of these concepts, studied mainly in physics and biology, for the social sciences. Students will explore agent-based modeling to discover emergent properties of social systems through computer simulations they create using NetLogo software. Reading and seminar discussion topics include conflict and cooperation, electoral competition, transmission of culture and social networks. Completion of the stats/methods sequence is highly recommended. 6 cr., SS, Not offered in 2009-2010.

POSC 332. Religion and Politics* In this class, we will investigate the relationship between politics and religion around the world. It is not a class on theology or belief systems. Instead, we will focus on describing and explaining how religious beliefs and organizations affect political outcomes and vice-versa. Topics will include the relationship between religion and the state, the political dimensions of religious movements, the religious dimensions of political movements, and how religious perspectives on such issues as gender, sexuality, race, and war reinforce or clash with political values and policy. 6 cr., SS, Not offered in 2009-2010.

POSC 333. Sustainability Science* This course is about the science of integrating social changes and environmental changes to understand and to be able to advance analytical concepts, research methods, and theories of society-nature interactions. Scholars in the field of sustainability science work to understand, explain, and predict both qualitative and quantitative changes that have occurred in society and nature. Students will learn fundamental theories and concepts that explain linkages between social change and environmental changes; gain methods and skills to measure social changes qualitatively and quantitatively; and gain critical thinking and writing skills by using climate change data and social change data. 6 cr., SS, Not offered in 2009-2010.

POSC 345. Guerillas, Warlords and Bandits: The Art of Asymmetric War* Guerilla insurgencies are a special kind of war and present special problems for foreign policy formation and military response. This course looks at historical cases and theoretical propositions that range from Sun Zi The Art of War to Mao Zedong, Vo Nguyen Giap, and Che Guevara. Case studies from China, Vietnam, Afghanistan, Iraq, early United States, and South America. Examination of strategies based on Chinese game of WeiQi (Go) as opposed to western Chess. 6 cr., SS, Not offered in 2009-2010.

POSC 346. Spies, Rogues and Statesmen: Intelligence and the Formation of Foreign Policy* Collecting and interpreting information--real and not-so-real--ripples across the making of defense strategy and foreign policy. This seminar examines the link between intelligence gathering and policy formation. Case studies from WWII, the Cold War, the Vietnam era, and the Iraqi Wars. 6 cr., SS, Not offered in 2009-2010.

POSC 347. America and Its Wars* War has a special place in American history and this course will look at the changing role of armed conflict in American foreign policy. The course will be based on a series of case studies and the class will look at "large wars" such as World War II and smaller "limited engagements" in Asia and Latin America. Students will examine the debates about strategies and tactics in each of these conflicts and then merge their insights from the case studies with arguments from the larger theoretical literature about war and its role in foreign policy. 6 cr., SS, FallR. Grow, B. Levin

POSC 350. Political Philosophy and the Book of Genesis* Much of the moral and political architecture of the post-modern, secular world traces back to pre-modern, religious scriptures--especially Genesis, the first book of the Bible. For this reason alone Genesis deserves attention. But there are even stronger reasons: With its accounts of creation, humanity’s relation to nature and the divine, human aspiration and failure, the origins of community, and the good life for both individuals and societies, Genesis offers enormous riches even for those who approach it from an "external" philosophic standpoint (as we will in this class) rather than an "internal" religious one. Readings include Genesis and commentary. 6 cr., SS, FallL. Cooper

POSC 351. Political Theory of Martin Luther King, Jr.* This seminar will examine the speeches, writings, and life of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Students will study King as an example of the responsible citizen envisioned by the theory expressed in The Federalist, as a contributor to the discourse of civil religion, and as a figure in recent American social history. Prerequisites: Political Science 122 or introductory history course. 6 cr., SS, RAD, Not offered in 2009-2010.

POSC 352. Political Theory of Alexis de Tocqueville* This course will be devoted to close study of Tocqueville's Democracy in America, which has plausibly been described as the best book ever written about democracy and the best book every written about America. Tocqueville uncovers the myriad ways in which equality, including especially the passion for equality, determines the character and the possibilities of modern humanity. Tocqueville thereby provides a political education that is also an education toward self-knowledge. 6 cr., SS, Not offered in 2009-2010.

POSC 355. Contemporary Feminist Thought: Identity, Culture and Rights* This course will look at the contemporary debate in multiculturalism in the context of a variety of liberal philosophical traditions, including contractarians, libertarians, and Utilitarians. These views of the relationship of individual to community will be compared to those of the communitarian and egalitarian traditions. Research papers may use a number of feminist theory frameworks and methods. Prerequisites: Women's and Gender Studies 110 or any political theory, feminist philosophy, or political philosophy course. 6 cr., SS, Not offered in 2009-2010.

POSC 358. Comparative Social Movements* This course will examine the role that social movements play in political life. The first part of the course will critically review the major theories that have been developed to explain how social movements form, operate and seek to influence politics at both the domestic and international levels. In the second part of the course, these theoretical approaches will be used to explore a number of case studies involving social movements that span several different issue areas and political regions. Potential case studies include the transnational environmental movement, religious movements in Latin America and the recent growth of far right activism in northern Europe. 6 cr., SS, Not offered in 2009-2010.

POSC 360. Political Economy Seminar* This seminar will use a number of contemporary theories to evaluate political economy phenomena. The class will include case studies, simulation exercises and field trips. 6 cr., SS, Not offered in 2009-2010.

POSC 361. Approaches to Development* The meaning of "development" has been contested across multiple disciplines. The development and continual existence of past civilizations has been at the core of the discourse among those who study factors leading to the rise and fall of civilizations. Can we reconcile the meaning of development in economic terms with cultural, ecological, political, religious, social and spiritual terms? How can we measure it quantitatively? What and how do the UNDP Human Development Indexes and the World Development Reports measure? What are the exemplary cases that illustrate development? How do individual choices and patterns of livelihood activities link to development trends? 6 cr., SS, WinterT. Myint

POSC 362. Globalization and the State* We will examine how and to what extent the processes of globalization are changing notions and practices of state sovereignty. Given that scholars do not agree on the definition of either state sovereignty or globalization, this is no easy task. We will begin by examining the historic development of state since the seventeenth century and how notions of state sovereignty have changed, to better understand how economic integration, the communications revolution and the growing importance of global civil society (globalization) are (re)shaping states. We will explore how globalization influences state behavior in the international realm and within its own borders. 6 cr., SS, Not offered in 2009-2010.

POSC 364. Capitalism and Its Critics* This research seminar examines the major debates in studies of contemporary capitalism in advanced capitalist and developing countries around the world. Moving beyond the classic theoretical debates of liberal, Marxist, developmentalist, and post-industrial arguments, the seminar will focus on recent debates concerning changes in labor markets, class structures, production systems, political institutions and social distribution, corporate governance, the multilateral system (e.g., IMF, the World Bank), supranational entities such as the European Union, and critical approaches on economic development, including new studies of the informal labor market. 6 cr., SS, Not offered in 2009-2010.

POSC 366. Urban Political Economy* Cross-listed with POSC.266. City revenue is increasingly dependent on tourism. Cities manufacture identity and entertainment, whether we think of Las Vegas or Jerusalem, Berlin or Bilbao, the ethnoscapes of Copenhagen or the red light district of Amsterdam. As cities compete in the global economy to become playgrounds for a transnational tourist class, what is the role of urban residents? Who governs? Who benefits? A research paper will be required. 6 cr., SS, WinterR. Keiser

POSC 367. Suburbanization in America* The process of suburbanization transformed the United States in a revolutionary way, yet this was a quiet revolution. Both the causes and consequences of suburbanization can be found in the country's politics, race relations, economy, literature and popular imagery, architecture and design, and our definition of community. This course will take an explicitly interdisciplinary approach to these topics. Prerequisite: Political Science 122 or American Studies 345. 6 cr., SS, Not offered in 2009-2010.

POSC 378. Beijing Program: Chinese Social and Political Institutions On-site examination and evaluation of important institutions (i.e., banks, hospitals, environment offices, middle schools, etc.) that shape the Chinese economic and political process. Students may take this course or optional 3-credit Chinese language course that is taught at three levels­depending on the student's proficiency. 3 cr., SS, Not offered in 2009-2010.

POSC 379. Beijing Program: Chinese Decision Making This course would be based on simulation exercise­--which is already part of the seminar--but restructured and expanded to place exercise in more exact theoretical frame. 3 cr., SS, Not offered in 2009-2010.

POSC 381. Beijing Program: Politics of Economic Development This is a cross-disciplinary program in which students from different academic departments analyze the economy of China, investigate the government institutions that develop and shape Chinese policy, and meet the people who make policy work. The seminar will combine classroom study with visits to economic agencies, government organizations, and industrial and commercial sites. 6 cr., SS, Not offered in 2009-2010.

POSC 382. Beijing Program: Chinese Economics in Transition This course introduces the student to China's historical, political, and economic development in the twentieth century. The primary framework applied is an analysis of the strategies and outcomes of economic development within the context of a particular socialist economic and political system. While focusing mainly on political-economic philosophies within real economic constraints. Prerequisites: Economics 110 and 111. 6 cr., SS, Not offered in 2009-2010.

POSC 383. Maastricht Program: Politics of the European Union This course examines the formation, development, institutions, laws, and policies of the European Union, with special emphasis on current issues arising from the Maastricht and Amsterdam Treaty revisions in the 1990s. Students will be divided into smaller groups to focus on different policy areas during the last two weeks of the course. 6 cr., SS, Not offered in 2009-2010.

POSC 400. Integrative Exercise 6 cr., S/NC, ND, Fall,Winter,SpringStaff