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Spanish (SPAN)

Chairs: Associate Professor Silvia L. López

Professors: Becky J. Boling, José Cerna-Bazán, Humberto R. Huergo

Associate Professors: Jorge Brioso, Silvia L. López

Assistant Professor: Maria Del Palmar Álvarez-Blanco, Yansi Perez

Senior Lecturers: María Elena Doleman, Diane Pearsall

Lecturer: Linda Demarest Burdell

Visiting Lecturer: Carlos Vargas-Salgado

Language Courses

Language courses 101, 102, 103, 204 are a sequential series of courses designed to prepare the student in the basic language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) through the study of grammar, literature, and culture, and/or to provide the foundation for pursuing advanced work in language and literature. Spanish 205, 206 and 207 are designed to develop the student's spoken and written mastery of the language through compositions and intensive oral work based on cultural and literary topics. Admission to these courses is determined either by appropriate high school CEEB or Carleton placement test scores or by completion of the previous course in the sequence with a grade of C- or better.

Literature Courses

We examine literary works for both their aesthetic and human values. Our literature courses have a number of goals: to refine and expand students' linguistic ability, to broaden their cultural understanding, to improve their ability to engage in literary analysis, to enhance their knowledge of literary history and criticism, and to help students better understand themselves and the human condition. In our discussions, we address universal themes and concerns, but we also try to uncover what is peculiarly Hispanic or Latin American about the works.

Requirements for a Major

Sixty-six credits in Spanish including either 205 or 206 and no more than twelve credits in the 205-210 sequence. Courses 101, 102, 103, 204 do not count toward the major. Students may not apply more than 18 credits from courses numbered 220-290 to the major. In addition to 66 credits in the major, six credits are required in literature outside the major. Majors must complete at least three courses in Latin American literature and three courses in Peninsular literature (Spain) before winter term of the senior year. Students also write an integrative exercise during senior year.

Concentration: See separate section for Latin American Studies Concentration.

Programs Abroad: Participation in a Carleton or in another approved foreign study program is highly recommended for students majoring or concentrating in the above areas. Students interested in study abroad should consult the section on international off-campus programs, and discuss alternatives with faculty in Spanish and with the Director of Off-Campus Studies.

Language Houses: Students have the opportunity to immerse themselves in the language by living in the Language House. The Associate is a native speaker, and students organize and participate in numerous cultural activities in the language houses.

Certificate of Advanced Study in Foreign Language and Literature: In order to receive the Certificate of Advanced Study in Spanish, students must fulfill the general requirements (refer to Academic Regulations) in the following course distribution: six courses completed with a grade of C- or better in Spanish beyond 103, including at least two upper-level literature courses (300-395). Although courses for the certificate may be taken on a S/CR/NC basis, "D" or "Cr" level work will not be sufficient to satisfy course requirements. No more than 12 credits from non-Carleton off-campus studies programs may be applied toward the certificate.

Spanish Courses

SPAN 101. Elementary Spanish This course introduces the basic structures of the Spanish language, everyday vocabulary and cultural situations. Students practice all four skills (reading, writing, listening and speaking) in Spanish. Taught five days a week in Spanish. Prerequisite: none (Placement score for students with previous experience in Spanish). 6 cr., ND, FallStaff

SPAN 102. Elementary Spanish This course introduces complex sentences and various tenses and short literary and cultural texts. Students practice all four skills (reading, writing, listening and speaking) in Spanish. Taught five days a week in Spanish. Prerequisite: Spanish 101 or placement score. 6 cr., ND, WinterStaff

SPAN 103. Intermediate Spanish This course continues the study of complex sentence patterns and reviews basic patterns in greater depth, partly through the discussion of authentic short stories. Students practice all four skills (reading, writing, listening and speaking) in Spanish. Taught five days a week in Spanish. Prerequisite: Spanish 102 or placement score. 6 cr., ND, SpringStaff

SPAN 204. Intermediate Spanish Through discussion of literary and cultural texts and films, as well as a review of grammar, this course aims to help students acquire greater skill and confidence in both oral and written expression. Taught three days a week in Spanish. Some Spanish 204 sections include a service-learning component, to enrich students' understanding of course material by integrating academic study with public service. The language classes team up with the Northfield public schools to help both Northfield and Carleton students improve their language skills. Prerequisite: Spanish 103 or placement score. 6 cr., Fall,Winter,SpringStaff

SPAN 205. Conversation and Composition A course designed to develop the student's oral and written mastery of Spanish. Advanced study of grammar. Compositions and conversations based on cultural and literary topics. There is also an audio-video component focused on current affairs. Prerequisite: Spanish 204 or proficiency. 6 cr., ND, Fall,Winter,SpringJ. Brioso, H. Huergo

SPAN 206. Mexico Program: Grammar and Conversation Together with a review of key grammar topics of previous language classes, this course takes advantage of on-site resources to further develop communicative skills in Spanish. The strong emphasis on students’ projects and presentations, as well as interactions with the native setting are geared toward a greater fluency in oral Spanish. This class is especially oriented to students who have completed Spanish 204. Prerequisite: Spanish 204. 6 cr., ND, WinterNon-Carleton Faculty

SPAN 207. Exploring Hispanic Culture Designed for the person who wants to develop greater fluency in speaking, writing, and reading Spanish in the context of a broad introduction to Hispanic culture. Short stories, plays, poems, films, and short novels are read with the goal of enhancing awareness of Hispanic diversity and stimulating classroom discussion. Prerequisite: Spanish 204 or proficiency. 6 cr., ND, RAD, Not offered in 2009-2010.

SPAN 208. Coffee and News An excellent opportunity to brush up your Spanish while learning about current issues in Spain and Latin America. The class meets only once a week for an hour. Class requirements include reading specific sections of Spain's leading newspaper, El Paí­s, everyday on the internet (El Paí­s), and then meeting once a week to exchange ideas over coffee with a small group of students like yourself. Prerequisite: Spanish 204 or proficiency. 2 cr., S/CR/NC, ND, Fall,Winter,SpringS. López

SPAN 209. Madrid Program: Current News This course is a discussion of current events affecting Spain as reflected in the daily press. 6 cr., ND, FallH. Huergo

SPAN 210. Mexico Program: Grammar and Writing While expanding communicative skills, this class focuses on compound sentence grammar and structures beyond the sentence level, and includes an intensive practice of different registers and varieties of writing in Spanish. Written work and in-class discussion focus on relevant aspects of Mexican and Latin American social reality. This class is especially oriented to students who have already completed Spanish 205. Prerequisite: Spanish 204. 6 cr., AL, WinterNon-Carleton Faculty

SPAN 238. Images of the Indian in Spanish American Literature After a historical survey of the relationship between national projects of social organization and the indigenous populations of the area, this course focuses on Indigenismo as a set of social discourses attempting to represent "the Indian," and on key works by Icaza (Ecuador), Asturias (Guatemala), Arguedas (Peru), and Castellanos (Mexico). While considering the specific literary quality of this writing, we will contrast its representation of "the Indian," with indigenous self-representation in oral-popular tradition and through intellectuals like Domitila Barrios, Rigoberta Menchú, Bernabe Condori and others, to better understand the relationship between official culture and its Other. Prerequisite: Spanish 204 or proficiency. 6 cr., AL, Not offered in 2009-2010.

SPAN 240. Introduction to Spanish Literature This course will examine the uniqueness of Spanish literature from the Middle Ages to the present. What is unique about Spanish literature? The meeting of Arabs, Christians, and Jews; the discovery of the Indies as told by Christopher Columbus; the enormous cultural and ethnic complexity of the conquest of the New World; the creation of the modern novel in the Lazarillo and its destruction in Cervante's Don Quixote; the mystic eroticism of St. Therese and St. John of the Cross; the ruminative poetry of Antonio Machado and the mythical poetry of Lorca. Prerequisite: Spanish 204 or proficiency. 6 cr., AL, Not offered in 2009-2010.

SPAN 242. Introduction to Latin American Literature An introductory course to reading major texts in Spanish provides an historical survey of the literary movements within Latin American literature from the pre-Hispanic to the contemporary period. Recommended as a foundation course for further study. Not open to seniors. Prerequisite: Spanish 204 or proficiency. 6 cr., AL, RAD, WinterS. López

SPAN 243. Latin American Theater in Translation: Nation, Power, Gender Introduction to key themes and modes of production in twentieth century theater in Latin America. We will read representative plays from established playwrights such as Rodolfo Usigli, Griselda Gambaro, Manuel Puig, Sabina Berman, Mario Vargas Llosa, Mario Benedetti, Ariel Dorfman, Susana Torres Molina among others. The course will be organized around themes of national and cultural identity, relations of power, and the (de)construction of gender. Students will be asked to put on scenes and develop areas of research. Prerequisite: Spanish 204 or proficiency. 6 cr., AL, Not offered in 2009-2010.

SPAN 244. Spain Today: Recent Changes through Narrative and Film Since the death of Franco in 1975, Spain has undergone huge political, socio-economic, and cultural transformations. Changes in the traditional roles of women, the legalization of gay marriage, the decline of the Catholic church, the increase of immigrants, Catalan and Basque nationalisms, and the integration of Spain in the European Union, have all challenged the definition of a national identity. Through contemporary narrative and film, this course will examine some of these changes and how they contribute to the creation of what we call Spain today. Prerequisite: Spanish 204 or proficiency. 6 cr., AL, RAD, FallP. Álvarez-Blanco

SPAN 247. Madrid Program: Spanish Art from El Greco to Picasso This course is a survey of Spanish art from the sixteenth to the twentieth centuries. Classes will meet at some of the finest museums in Madrid, including the Prado Museum and the Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofia (Museum of Modern Art). Art lectures will be supplemented by field trips to Toledo, Barcelona, Cordoba, and Seville. Prerequisite: Spanish 204 or proficiency. 4 cr., AL, FallNon-Carleton Faculty

SPAN 250. Spanish Cinema This course will study Spanish film from 1950s to the present. Through the study of the social and political processes involved in the conception of time and memory we will discuss the work of internationally recognized filmmakers such as Luis Buñuel, Luis García Berlanga, Mario Camus, Carlos Saura, Victor Erice and Pedro Almodóvar. Extra time. Prerequisites: Spanish 204 or proficiency. 6 cr., AL, Not offered in 2009-2010.

SPAN 252. Love Stories in Latin American Prose From soap operas (culebrones) and popular romance novels (la novela rosa) to stories written by Gabriel García Márquez and Laura Esquivel, love stories never seem to lose their appeal. In this course we will read a popular Spanish romance novel by Corín Tellado, watch a Latin American soap opera, and read and discuss variations on the basic novela rosa by Latin American authors. Among possible authors studied are Gabriel García Márquez, Laura Esquivel, Daína Chaviano, Zoé Valdés, Manuel Puig, Isabel Allende, Gioconda Belli, Mayra Montero. Prerequisite: Spanish 204 or proficiency. 6 cr., AL, RAD, Not offered in 2009-2010.

SPAN 255. Women Dramatists in Latin America: Staging Conflicts This course examines contemporary plays written by Latin American women from a gendered perspective. Issues range from women and political repression to a critique of gender roles. As we read the plays, we will consider both the literary qualities of dramatic texts and the semiotics of staging and its potential for reconceptualizing women’s roles in Latin American society and culture. Possible dramatists are Luisa Josefina Hernández, Rosario Castellanos, Griselda Gambaro, Elena Garro, Sabina Berman, Susana Torres Molina, Marcela del Río. Prerequisite: Spanish 204 or proficiency. 6 cr., AL, RAD, Not offered in 2009-2010.

SPAN 256. Lorca, Buñuel, and Dalí: Poetry, Film, and Painting in Spain Lorca, Buñuel, and Dalí attended the same college in Madrid. It was the 1920s and the young were truly young and almost everything was possible. Soon Lorca became Dalí's secret lover and muse, inspiring many of his early paintings and launching his career in the artistic circles of Barcelona and Madrid. At the same time, Dalí collaborated with Buñuel in two landmarks of experimental cinema--The Andalusian Dog and The Golden Age. This course examines the friendship between the three artists and their place in the history of twentieth-century art, film, and literature. Extra time. Prerequisite: Spanish 205 or proficiency. 6 cr., AL, Not offered in 2009-2010.

SPAN 259. Mexico Program: Images of Mexico in Literature and Popular Culture Readings and discussion in this course focus on the cultural construction of "lo mexicano" (Mexicanness). Particular attention is paid to some cultural aspects of the Puebla-Veracruz area, and the human experiences and the ideological issues arising from the Mexico-U.S. cross-border situation. Prerequisite: Spanish 204 or proficiency. 6 cr., AL, WinterJ. Cerna-Bazán

SPAN 260. Forces of Nature This course examines nature and its relationship to Latin American identity across the last 200 years, but with emphasis on the twentieth century. Paradise regained and lost, monster or endangered habitat, nature plays a central role in Latin American development and its literature. Its literary image has varied greatly in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, at times suggesting the lost Garden of Eden, at other times mirroring human cruelty, and recently coming center stage in the ecological novel. Among the authors studied in this course are Sarmiento, Quiroga, Gallegos, Rulfo, Seplveda, Belli, and Montero. Prerequisite: Spanish 204 or proficiency. 6 cr., AL, RAD, SpringB. Boling

SPAN 261. Mexico Program: The Old and the New in Contemporary Mexico This course presents a survey of political, social, economic, and religious institutions and movements of contemporary Mexico, with attention paid also to their historical background. Classes are supplemented by visits to relevant sites and by lectures by local intellectuals when appropriate. Prerequisites: Spanish 204 or proficiency. 6 cr., ND, WinterNon-Carleton Faculty

SPAN 262. Myth and History in Central American Literature In this course we study the relationship between myth and history in Central America since its origins in the Popol Vuh, the sacred texts of the Mayans until the period of the post-civil wars era. The course is organized in a chronological manner. We will study, in addition to the Popol Vuh, the chronicles of Alvarado, some poems by Rubén Darío and Francisco Gavidia, some of the writings of Miguel Ángel Asturias and Salarrué. The course will end with a study of critical visions of the mythical presented by more contemporary authors such as Roque Dalton and Luis de Lión. 6 cr., AL, WinterY. Pérez

SPAN 263. History of Human Rights This course proposes a genealogical study of the concept of Human Rights. The course will begin with the debates in sixteenth century Spain about the theological, political and juridical rights of "Indians." The course will cover four centuries and the following topics will be discussed: the debates about poverty in sixteenth century Spain; the birth of the concept of tolerance in the eighteenth century; the creation of the modern political constitution in the U.S., France and Spain; the debates about women's rights, abortion and euthanasia, etc. 6 cr., AL, RAD, SpringJ. Brioso

SPAN 290. Madrid Program: Independent Reading Basic readings in Spanish history and culture in preparation for the program. 2 cr., S/CR/NC, ND, FallH. Huergo

SPAN 301. Tragedy This course explores the development of the tragic notion from Aristotle to Hegel, focusing on a number of Spanish classics such as Cervantes, Calderón, Lorca, Valle Inclán, and others. Prerequisites: Spanish 205 or above. 6 cr., AL, Not offered in 2009-2010.

SPAN 320. New Spanish Voices Since 1980, Spain has experienced a literary and artistic boom, with scores of young novelists and filmmakers whose works challenge traditional notions of the individual and society. This course will examine some of these works, paying attention to regions of Spain normally excluded from the curriculum--Galicia, the Basque Country, and Catalonia. Discussions topics include gender and sexuality, cultural and personal memory, exile and migration, and the relationship between voice and power. Prerequisite: Spanish 205 or above. 6 cr., AL, RAD, Not offered in 2009-2010.

SPAN 326. Writers in Exile Two countries and four writers will be the protagonists of our course: Guillermo Cabrera Infante, a refugee from the Cuban revolution living in London while trying to recover his lost city Habana through his writing; Reinaldo Arenas, another Cuban refugee dying of AIDS in New York while writing about his illness and exile; Spanish novelist Jorge Semprún, a deportee and survivor of a concentration camp established in Paris and writing in French; and Juan Goytisolo, a Spanish expatriated in Morocco, writing in Spanish and Arabic about his own country and the Muslim world. Prerequisite: Spanish 205 or above. 6 cr., AL, Not offered in 2009-2010.

SPAN 328. The Roaring Twenties The place: Madrid and Barcelona. The time: 1920s. The actors: the best minds of a brilliant generation of writers, painters, architects, and filmmakers Gómez de la Serna, Gasch, Miró, Moreno Villa, Gutiérrez Soto, Buñuel, Dalí, Lorca, Ortega. The event: jazz and assembly lines, photography and boxing, African masks and mechanical reproduction, sport cars and comic cinema, glass buildings and montage, mass entertainment and collective ennui, the October revolution and the rise of Fascism. Prerequisite: Spanish 205 or above. 6 cr., AL, RAD, Not offered in 2009-2010.

SPAN 330. The Invention of the Modern Novel: Cervantes' Don Quijote Among other things, Don Quijote is a "remake," an adaptation of several literary models popular at the time the picaresque novel, the chivalry novel, the sentimental novel, the Byzantine novel, the Italian novella, etc. This course will examine the ways in which Cervantes transformed these models to create what is considered by many the first "modern" novel in European history. Prerequisite: Spanish 205 or above. 6 cr., AL, Not offered in 2009-2010.

SPAN 336. Genealogies of the Modern: Turn of the Century Latin America In this course we will examine what the literary tradition has come to name "modernismo." We will cover the period between 1870 and 1910. We will study it in the context of the experience of modernity, that is the configuration of emergent cities, urban culture, mass media, technological innovation and the modernization of the figure of the writer. Particular attention will be given to the understanding of the modern in a non-European context and its relation to what we know today as modern Latin American identity. Selections from: Martí, Darío, Rodó, González Prada, Lugones, Silva, Agustini among others. Prerequisite: Spanish 205 or above. 6 cr., AL, RAD, FallS. López

SPAN 340. Latin American Prose: Dictatorships and Revolution in the Latin American Narrative This course briefly examines the origins and development of the Latin American narrative and then focuses on the literary reaction to dictatorship and revolution. It stresses a critical reading and discussion of major works by Azuela, Castellanos, and Fuentes (Mexico), Asturias (Guatemala), and Allende (Chile). The emphasis is on Mexico and the literary interpretation of the Revolution of 1910 and the society that grew out of it. Prerequisite: Spanish 205 or above. 6 cr., AL, RAD, Not offered in 2009-2010.

SPAN 342. Latin American Theater: Nation, Power, Gender Introduction to key themes and modes of production in twentieth century theater in Latin America. We will read representative plays from established playwrights such as Rodolfo Usigli, Griselda Gambaro, Manuel Puig, Sabina Berman, Mario Vargas Llosa, Mario Benedetti, Ariel Dorfman, Susana Torres Molina among others. The course will be organized around themes of national and cultural identity, relations of power, and the (de)construction of gender. Students will be asked to put on scenes and develop areas of research. Prerequisite: Spanish 205 or above. 6 cr., AL, WinterB. Boling

SPAN 344. Women Writers in Latin America: Challenging Gender and Genre The course will study texts (written by women) that deal critically with issues of gender, challenging implicit and explicit patriarchal values. Emphasis will also be placed on how these women have experimented with narrative and poetic genres to express their personal concerns and to deconstruct orthodox structures. Authors usually included: Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, Storni, Agustini, Castellanos, Poniatowska, Molloy, Valenzuela, Ferré, Garro, Peri Rossi, Allende. Prerequisite: Spanish 240 or a 300 level literature course is recommended. 6 cr., AL, RAD, Not offered in 2009-2010.

SPAN 349. Madrid Program: Theory and Practice of Urban Life More than a study of the image of Madrid in Spanish literature, this course examines the actual experience of living in a cosmoplitan city through a variety of disciplines, including Urban Studies, Philosophy, Architecture, Sociology, and Spanish poetry and fiction. 6 cr., AL, FallH. Huergo

SPAN 350. Recent Trends in Latin American Narrative: Pop Culture and Testimony Postboom narratives question the very nature of telling stories, from Rigoberta Menchú’s testimony of genocide to the virtual reality of MacOndo. Eduardo Galeano, Manuel Puig, and Elena Poniatowska are some of the writers we will examine, writers who combine fiction and reportage, recontextualize the novela rosa, or write an urban literature within a global context. What makes these new texts literature? How has the craft of author changed, and what constitutes a postmodern narrative discourse? Taught in Spanish. Prerequisite: Spanish 205 or above. 6 cr., AL, RAD, Not offered in 2009-2010.

SPAN 353. History and Subjectivity in Latin American Poetry In this course we will examine this poetic experimentation in relation to the major political and ideological trends that have shaped Spanish American societies and cultures in the twentieth century. While focusing on the work of one major figure, we will read it in relationship to the poetry of other authors. Some authors included will be Pablo Neruda, Csar Vallejo, Gabriela Mistral, Nicanor Parra, Octavio Paz, Enrique Lihn, Ernesto Cardenal, Blanca Varela and Alejandra Pizarnik. Prerequisite: Spanish 205 or proficiency. 6 cr., AL, FallJ. Cerna-Bazán

SPAN 356. The Cuban Revolution and the Revolution of Literature The Cuban Revolution symbolizes a moment of tremendous political, social, and cultural transformation in Latin America. Out of this political upheaval arose a cultural renovation that resulted in various forms of artistic experimentation as well as different narratives about the revolution. We will focus on several practices and discourses (literature, literary and cultural criticism, film and art) that were central to the debates fostered during this period. We will read some Latin American writers who wrote about the concept of revolution (Roque Dalton, Julio Cortázar, etc.), as well as Cuban authors who wrote about the Cuban Revolution (Heberto Padilla, Nancy Morejón, etc.). 6 cr., AL, SpringY. Pérez

SPAN 358. Topics in Hispanic Literature: The Spanish Civil War Considered by many historians the beginning of World War II, the Spanish Civil war served as the arena where the main ideologies of the twentieth century-Capitalism, Fascism, and Communism-first clashed. The result was not only one of the bloodiest wars in history, but also one of the most idealistic, with 40,000 volunteers from all over the world willing to die in defense of a country they did not even know. This course will explore the meaning of the war through a variety of mediums and disciplines, including literature, history, graphic arts, and films. Prerequisite: Spanish 205 or above. 6 cr., AL, RAD, WinterH. Huergo

SPAN 400. Integrative Exercise 6 cr., S/NC, ND, Fall,Winter,SpringStaff