ACE Courses & Independent Study

"Engagement in this sense is not just a proxy for learning but a fundamental purpose of education."- Lee Shulman, Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching  

Academic Civic Engagement at Carleton College is an approach to education focusing on community-based learning, community-based research, and service learning.

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Applied ACE

Winter 2017

  • Public Health in Practice
    Students work on a public health-related civic engagement project in collaboration with a community partner, set their individual project back into the wider context of public health, and prepare to present their experience to a broader audience.
  • Pre-Student Teaching Practicum: Teaching Reading in the Content Areas
    This course prepares students for their student teaching placement by providing licensure candidates with an opportunity to work in schools and community organizations related to schools and to reflect on that experience in a classroom setting.
  • Physical Systems: Mechanics and Relativity
    The kinematics and dynamics of some simple systems are investigated using Newton's laws, vector analysis, and the conservation laws of momentum and energy.
  • Multicultural Education
    This course focuses on the respect for human diversity, especially as these relate to various racial, cultural and economic groups, and to women.
  • Statistical Consulting
    Students will apply their statistical knowledge by analyzing data problems solicited from the Northfield community. Students will also learn basic consulting skills, including communication and ethics.
  • Sustainable Energy Practice and Prospects (India)
    We start with a two-week field trip in December to Auroville, on the Southeast coast of India near Chennai including meetings with local experts, and site visits, culminating with the installation of a sustainable energy system.
  • Women and Gender in Europe before the French Revolution
    This course examines the lives of women and their experiences in Europe before the modern era including how they managed their private lives, their family commitments, their faith, and their intellectual lives.
  • West African Drum Ensemble
    The ensemble will use indigenous instruments and an African approach to musical training in order to learn and perform rhythms and songs from West Africa. This ensemble often travels to local elementary schools to perform and offer workshops.
  • The Merchant of Venice: A Project
    This course investigates the Merchant of Venice's historical, political, religious, and theatrical contexts as we try to understand not only the world that produced the play, but the world that came out of it.
  • Tasmania: Geology, Natural History and Conservation Research
    Following the winter break trip to Tasmania, students will complete and present research projects. In this course, we will also consider comparative examples of natural history and conservation policy drawn from the American Midwest.
  • Hydrology
    A seminar on major principles of ground and surface water hydrology and their application to contemporary hydrologic problems. The course will draw considerably on student-directed investigation of critical areas of study in hydrology.
  • Immunology
    This course will examine the role of the immune system in defense, allergic reactions, and autoimmunity.
  • Classical and Quantum Optics
    Includes the phenomena of interference, diffraction and coherence and quantum optical applications. Modern applications of these areas are studied through such topics as fiber optics telecommunication and optical data storage.
  • Anthropology of Health and Wellness
    This course examines patients, practitioners, and the social networks and contexts through which therapies are managed to better understand medical systems as well as the significance of the anthropological study of misfortune.
  • African American History II
    This course traces the history of African Americans from slavery to freedom; the post-Reconstruction erosion of civil rights to the roots of the modern Civil Rights movement and beyond.
  • FOCUS Colloquium
  • FOCUS Colloquium
    This colloquium is designed to give students participating in the Focusing on Cultivating Scientists program an opportunity to learn and use skills in scientific study, reasoning, and modeling.
  • FOCUS Sophomore Colloquium
    This colloquium is designed for sophomore students participating in the Focusing on Cultivating Scientists program. It will provide an opportunity to participate in STEM-based projects on campus and in the community.

Spring 2017

  • The Ethics of Civic Engagement
    In this course, students will discuss the ethical questions that arise when they engage with others in research, service, organizing, or policy work.
  • Designing for Diversity: Anthropology and New Technologies
    Students in this course learn to apply anthropology to study user experience in order to propose ways to make technologies more inclusive and culturally sensitive.
  • Archaelogical Methods
    This course involves real archaeological fieldwork, and students will have an opportunity to contribute to the history of the local community while learning archaeological methods applicable all over the world.
  • Human Reproduction and Sexuality
    This course will review the basic biology of all aspects of reproduction--from genes to behavior--in an attempt to better understand one of the more basic and important processes in nature.
  • History Beyond the Walls
    This course will examine the world of history outside the walls of academia. Looking at secondary-school education, museums, and public policy, we will explore the ways in which both general and specialized publics learn and think about history.
  • West African Drum Ensemble
    The ensemble will use indigenous instruments and an African approach to musical training in order to learn and perform rhythms and songs from West Africa.
  • Statistical Consulting
    Students will apply their statistical knowledge by analyzing data problems solicited from the Northfield community. Students will also learn basic consulting skills, including communication and ethics.
  • Environment and Society
    This course offers an interdisciplinary introduction to a number of the pressing environmental changes currently facing human societies around the world.
  • FOCUS Colloquium
    This colloquium is designed to give students participating in the Focusing on Cultivating Scientists program an opportunity to learn and use skills in scientific study, reasoning, and modeling.
  • Intermediate German
    Continuation of the study of basic structural patterns of the German language, and the reading and discussion of longer texts, films, and other media from German-speaking cultures.
  • Philosophy of Children
    The bulk of this course is devoted to preparing for, and then making, visits to a first grade class at Greenvale Park Elementary School to teach philosophy to children via kids' books.
  • Advanced Ceramics
    This course is a continuation of either or both beginning courses, focusing on sophisticated handbuilding and throwing techniques and advanced problem-solving in ceramics.
  • Exile in Literature and History
    This course examines four different moments in the history of Spanish exile: the mass expulsion of Jews in 1492, that of Moors converted to Christianity in 1609, the Liberal exile in 1823, and the Republican exile in 1939.
  • FOCUS Sophomore Colloquium
    This colloquium is designed for sophomore students participating in the Focusing on Cultivating Scientists program. It will provide an opportunity to participate in STEM-based projects on campus and in the community.
  • Intermediate German
    Continuation of the study of basic structural patterns of the German language, and the reading and discussion of longer texts, films, and other media from German-speaking cultures.

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