Course Archive

ACE Comps

Winter 2017

  • Computer Science Integrative Exercise
    Beginning with the prototypes developed in the Senior Seminar, project teams will complete their project and present it to the department.

Applied ACE

Spring 2018

  • Intermediate German
    Continuation of the study of basic structural patterns of the German language, and the reading and discussion of longer texts, films, and other media from German-speaking cultures.
  • Educational Studies Senior Seminar
    This is a research and design seminar for educational studies concentrators. It focuses on a contemporary issue in American education.
  • Geology of Soils
    The study of soil formation, and physical and chemical properties of soils especially as related to geomorphology and land use. Laboratories and field trips will emphasize how to describe and interpret soils.
  • The Ethics of Civic Engagement
  • Sustainable Development
    This course is designed to give students the ability to recognize and address sustainable development issues in any context.
  • Pre-Student Teaching Practicum: Teaching Reading in the Content Areas
    The course provides a theoretical and practical foundation for helping secondary teachers learn to provide specific instructional support for secondary readers.
  • Methods of Social Research
    The course is concerned with social scientific inquiry and explanation, particularly with reference to sociology and anthropology. Topics covered include research design, data collection, and analysis of data.
  • Statistical Consulting
    Students will apply their statistical knowledge by analyzing data problems solicited from the Northfield community. Students will also learn basic consulting skills, including communication and ethics.
  • Gender, Globalization and War
    This course examines the relationship between globalization, gender and militarism to understand how globalization and militarism are gendered, and processes through which gender becomes globalized and militarized.
  • Visions and Visionaries: An Introduction to Visual Communication Analysis and Media Archeology
    This course, focusing on both theory and practice, will provide Spanish students interested in the representation of global issues, social movements, and activism the opportunity to explore the field of visual communication.
  • Environment and Society
    This course offers an interdisciplinary introduction to a number of the pressing environmental changes currently facing human societies around the world.
  • West African Drum Ensemble
    The ensemble will use indigenous instruments and an African approach to musical training in order to learn and perform rhythms and songs from West Africa.
  • FOCUS Sophomore Colloquium
    This colloquium is designed for sophomore students participating in the Focusing on Cultivating Scientists program. It will provide an opportunity to participate in STEM-based projects on campus and in the community.

Winter 2018

  • Anthropology of Health and Illness
    This course examines patients, practitioners, and the social networks and contexts through which therapies are managed to better understand medical systems as well as the significance of the anthropological study of misfortune.
  • Intermediate Spanish
    Through discussion of literary and cultural texts and films, as well as a review of grammar, this course aims to help students acquire greater skill and confidence in both oral and written expression.
  • Sports and Globalization in London and Seville: Introductory Coaching Practicum
    Students will practice methods of teaching skills, structure, and strategies of team-oriented sports in a cross-cultural setting.
  • West African Drum Ensemble
    The ensemble will use indigenous instruments and an African approach to musical training in order to learn and perform rhythms and songs from West Africa.
  • Advanced Ceramics
    This course is a continuation of either or both beginning courses, focusing on sophisticated hand building and throwing techniques and advanced problem-solving in ceramics.
  • Statistical Consulting
    Students will apply their statistical knowledge by analyzing data problems solicited from the Northfield community. Students will also learn basic consulting skills, including communication and ethics.
  • Adolescent Cognitive Development: Developing an Identity and Life Plans
    An examination of the recent literature on how adolescents develop their value system, explore their goals, begin to make a life-framing decision, establish new relationships, and discover answers to the question "Who am I?"
  • Physical Systems: Mechanics and Relativity
    The course moves beyond the Newtonian framework to address topics including special relativity and also selected applications to atomic, nuclear, and particle physics.
  • Icons for All: A Public Humanities Practicum
    Students will focus on all aspects of mounting a successful public exhibition. They will develop the didactic materials for an exhibition on icons, including educational materials for K-12 and programming and docent training for adults.
  • FOCUS Sophomore Colloquium
    This colloquium is designed for sophomore students participating in the Focusing on Cultivating Scientists program. It will provide an opportunity to participate in STEM-based projects on campus and in the community.
  • Immunology
    This course will examine the role of the immune system in defense, allergic reactions, and autoimmunity.

Fall 2017

  • Race, Immigration, and Schools
    This course explores the important role that public schools have played in the American national imagination as the way to socialize students about what it means to be American and to prepare them to participate as citizens in a democracy.
  • Mining and the Environment
    Students will explore rich and intersecting issues that arise with this type of resource extraction in landscapes at risk, globally and in Minnesota.
  • Environmental Ethics
    This course is an introduction to the central ethical debates in environmental policy and practice, as well as some of the major traditions of environmental thought.
  • Nonfiction
    Students engage with diverse modes of nonfiction production including essayistic, experimental, and participatory forms and create community videos in partnership with CCCE and local organizations.
  • Civic Engagement, Social Change, and the Participatory Video
    Students will understand how to produce an effective short participatory video and they will also learn practical tools and techniques used in visual persuasion.
  • Cognitive Development in Childhood
    This Argument and Inquiry seminar will focus on the cognitive changes experienced by children in the preschool and elementary school years. Weekly observation at local day care centers or elementary schools will be a required course component.
  • Introduction to Environmental Geology
    An introduction to geology emphasizing environmental health and humankind's use and abuse of soil, water, fuels, and other resources. Field trips and laboratories included.
  • Educational Psychology
    Three hours outside of class per week are devoted to observing learning activities in public school elementary and secondary classrooms and working with students alongside learning about the sociocultural contexts of schools.
  • Health Psychology
    Students in groups will critically examine the effects of local policies on health outcomes and propose policy changes supported by theory and research.
  • Senior Seminar
    As part of their senior capstone experience, majors will work together in teams (typically four to seven students per team) on faculty-specified topics to design and implement the first stage of a project.
  • Intermediate Spanish
    Spanish 204 integrates academic study with public service. The language classes team up with the Northfield public schools to help both Northfield and Carleton students through service-learning.
  • FOCUS Sophomore Colloquium
    This colloquium is designed for sophomore students participating in the Focusing on Cultivating Scientists program. It will provide an opportunity to participate in STEM-based projects on campus and in the community.
  • Looking at Animals
    Students learn to watch media critically, asking questions about production, distribution, and audience, while exploring perspectives in lesser-known and experimental works.
  • Measuring and Evaluating Social and Ecological Systems
    We study measurement, monitoring, and management of prairie and forest ecosystems in local agricultural use and restoration projects. Much of the course occurs on site in field trip locations.
  • New African Migrations
    This course introduces students to African and African diaspora studies through an examination of new African migrations.
  • Spain Today: Recent Changes through Narrative and Film
    Through contemporary narrative and film, this course will examine some of these changes and how they contribute to the creation of what we call Spain today.
  • Statistical Consulting
    Students will apply their statistical knowledge by analyzing data problems solicited from the Northfield community. Students will also learn basic consulting skills, including communication and ethics.
  • Soot, Smog and Satanic Mills: Environment and Industrialization
    In this course, we trace the history of industrialization through the lens of the impact of this major social and economic change on the built and natural environment and on public health.

Spring 2017

  • Statistical Consulting
    Students will apply their statistical knowledge by analyzing data problems solicited from the Northfield community. Students will also learn basic consulting skills, including communication and ethics.
  • History Beyond the Walls
    This course will examine the world of history outside the walls of academia. Looking at secondary-school education, museums, and public policy, we will explore the ways in which both general and specialized publics learn and think about history.
  • Pre-Student Teaching Practicum: Teaching Reading in the Content Areas
    This course prepares students for their student teaching placement by providing licensure candidates with an opportunity to work in schools and community organizations related to schools and to reflect on that experience in a classroom setting.
  • Methods of Sociological Research
    The course is concerned with social scientific inquiry and explanation, particularly with reference to sociology and anthropology. Topics covered include research design, data collection, and analysis of data.
  • Philosophy of Children
    The bulk of this course is devoted to preparing for, and then making, visits to a first grade class at Greenvale Park Elementary School to teach philosophy to children via kids' books.
  • Environment and Society
    This course offers an interdisciplinary introduction to a number of the pressing environmental changes currently facing human societies around the world.
  • EDUC Senior Seminar
    This seminar focuses on a contemporary issue in American education. Some off campus work with public school students and teachers is an integral part of the seminar.
  • Educational Psychology
    Human development and learning theories are studied in relation to the teaching-learning process and the sociocultural contexts of schools. Observing learning activities in elementary and secondary classrooms and working with students.
  • West African Drum Ensemble
    The ensemble will use indigenous instruments and an African approach to musical training in order to learn and perform rhythms and songs from West Africa.
  • Designing for Diversity: Anthropology and New Technologies
    Students in this course learn to apply anthropology to study user experience in order to propose ways to make technologies more inclusive and culturally sensitive.
  • Archaelogical Methods
    This course involves real archaeological fieldwork, and students will have an opportunity to contribute to the history of the local community while learning archaeological methods applicable all over the world.
  • Methods of Teaching Mathematics
    Methods of teaching mathematics in grades 7-12. Issues in contemporary mathematics education. Regular visits to school classrooms and teaching a class are required.
  • Advanced Ceramics
    This course is a continuation of either or both beginning courses, focusing on sophisticated handbuilding and throwing techniques and advanced problem-solving in ceramics.
  • Intermediate German
    Continuation of the study of basic structural patterns of the German language, and the reading and discussion of longer texts, films, and other media from German-speaking cultures.
  • The Ethics of Civic Engagement
    In this course, students will discuss the ethical questions that arise when they engage with others in research, service, organizing, or policy work.

Winter 2017

  • India Program: Civic Engagement in India
    Students will work with community groups that support local visions for an equitable and sustainable society. Part of the OCS India Program
  • Hydrology
    A seminar on major principles of ground and surface water hydrology and their application to contemporary hydrologic problems. The course will draw considerably on student-directed investigation of critical areas of study in hydrology.
  • Immunology
    This course will examine the role of the immune system in defense, allergic reactions, and autoimmunity.
  • FOCUS Colloquium
    This colloquium is designed to give students participating in the Focusing on Cultivating Scientists program an opportunity to learn and use skills in scientific study, reasoning, and modeling.
  • The Merchant of Venice: A Project
    This course investigates the Merchant of Venice's historical, political, religious, and theatrical contexts as we try to understand not only the world that produced the play, but the world that came out of it.
  • Sustainable Energy Practice and Prospects (India)
    We start with a two-week field trip in December to Auroville, on the Southeast coast of India near Chennai including meetings with local experts, and site visits, culminating with the installation of a sustainable energy system.
  • Statistical Consulting
    Students will apply their statistical knowledge by analyzing data problems solicited from the Northfield community. Students will also learn basic consulting skills, including communication and ethics.
  • Multicultural Education
    This course focuses on the respect for human diversity, especially as these relate to various racial, cultural and economic groups, and to women.
  • Anthropology of Health and Wellness
    This course examines patients, practitioners, and the social networks and contexts through which therapies are managed to better understand medical systems as well as the significance of the anthropological study of misfortune.
  • FOCUS Colloquium
  • Women and Gender in Europe before the French Revolution
    This course examines the lives of women and their experiences in Europe before the modern era including how they managed their private lives, their family commitments, their faith, and their intellectual lives.
  • Tasmania: Geology, Natural History and Conservation Research
    Following the winter break trip to Tasmania, students will complete and present research projects. In this course, we will also consider comparative examples of natural history and conservation policy drawn from the American Midwest.
  • FOCUS Sophomore Colloquium
    This colloquium is designed for sophomore students participating in the Focusing on Cultivating Scientists program. It will provide an opportunity to participate in STEM-based projects on campus and in the community.
  • Physical Systems: Mechanics and Relativity
    The kinematics and dynamics of some simple systems are investigated using Newton's laws, vector analysis, and the conservation laws of momentum and energy.
  • Classical and Quantum Optics
    Includes the phenomena of interference, diffraction and coherence and quantum optical applications. Modern applications of these areas are studied through such topics as fiber optics telecommunication and optical data storage.

Fall 2016

  • EDUC 234: Educational Psychology
    Human development and learning theories are studied in relation to the teaching-learning process and the sociocultural contexts of schools. Observing learning activities in elementary and secondary classrooms and working with students.
  • IDSC 298: FOCUS Sophomore Colloquium
    This colloquium is designed for sophomore students participating in the Focusing on Cultivating Scientists program. It will provide an opportunity to participate in STEM-based projects on campus and in the community.
  • MATH 280: Statistical Consulting
    Students will apply their statistical knowledge by analyzing data problems solicited from the Northfield community. Students will also learn basic consulting skills, including communication and ethics.
  • CS 399: Senior Seminar
    As part of their senior capstone experience, majors will work together in teams (typically four to seven students per team) on faculty-specified topics to design and implement the first stage of a project.
  • ENTS 215: Environmental Ethics
    This course is an introduction to the central ethical debates in environmental policy and practice, as well as some of the major traditions of environmental thought.
  • IDSC 235: Perspectives in Public Health
    This course will explore the many dimensions of public health within the United States and provide an introduction to community based work and research.
  • WGST 285: Gender Violence and Feminist Self-Defense
    This course will focus on the theories and praxis feminists have put forth to resist gender and sexual violence. Students will participate in self-defense programs and reflect on feminist theories of resistance in the context of personal experience.
  • BIOL 322: Ecosystem Ecology Laboratory
    Prerequisite: Biology 126 and one of the following: Biology 125, Geology 110, Chemistry 123 or Chemistry 128. Requires concurrent registration in Biology 321.
  • GEOL 210: Geomorphology
    Study of the geological processes and factors which influence the origin and development of the surficial features of the earth, with an emphasis on some or all of the processes in Minnesota. Laboratories and field trips included.
  • CAMS 270: Nonfiction
    This course addresses nonfiction media as both art form and historical practice by exploring the expressive, rhetorical, and political possibilities of nonfiction production.
  • RELG 243: Native American Religious Freedom
    This course explores historical and legal contexts in which Native Americans have practiced their religions in the U.S. Projects integrate academic learning and student involvement in matters of particular concern to contemporary native communities.
  • PSYC 218: Hormones and Behavior
    In this course, students will learn about how hormones act in the brain and the body to affect behaviors.
  • SPAN 204: Intermediate Spanish
    This course aims to help students acquire greater skill and confidence in both oral and written expression. The language classes team up with the Northfield public schools to help both Northfield and Carleton students improve their language skills.
  • PSYC 383: The Social Psychology of Gender: Playing by the "Gender" Rules
    n this course, we will systematically review and analyze psychological theory and empirical research related to gender roles, gender stereotypes, and power differentials in society.
  • POSC 202: Parties, Interest Groups, and Elections
    Examination of the American electoral system and its components: parties, interest groups and the media. The impact of parties and interests on national policy making is also explored. The course will devote special attention to the 2016 election.
  • PHYS 210: Sustainable Energy Principles and Design
    The course will consider the world energy landscape with particular local and global foci. Includes a significant group academic civic engagement project that focuses on renewable energy design

Spring 2016

  • GEOL 120: Introduction to Environmental Geology
    An introduction to geology emphasizing environmental health and humankind's use and abuse of soil, water, fuels, and other resources. Students will examine geothermal energy and prospective planning on Carleton's campus.
  • ARTS 330: Advanced Ceramics
    This course is a continuation of either or both beginning courses, focusing on sophisticated hand-building and throwing techniques. Students will create over 400 bowls to be sold at Empty Bowls as part of a fundraiser for the local food shelf.
  • GERM 103: Intermediate German
    Completion of the study of basic structural patterns of the German language, and the reading and discussion of a longer literary work. Students will work with Northfield High School AP German students to get to know Austria, Switzerland, and Berlin.
  • ENTS 110: Environment and Society
    This course offers an interdisciplinary introduction to the pressing environmental changes societies face worldwide. Students will collect information on the Prairie Creek WMA with the aim of enriching the Friends of Prairie Creek website.
  • ARBC 206: Arabic in Cultural Context
    In this course students will continue to develop their Arabic language skills, including expanding their command of Arabic grammar and improving their reading and writing skills. Students are matched with Syrian students through Paper Airplanes.
  • HIST 217: Engaging Youth in the Past
    The course centers on a civic engagement project mentoring sixth grade students at the Northfield Middle School as they research and produce projects for a local version of National History Day.
  • EDUC 375: Issues in Science Education: Policy and Praxis
    This colloquium focuses on the pedagogy of science teaching, both in the United States and abroad. This course will also include active involvement with local schools and educators to ground it in lived practice.
  • MATH 280: Statistical Consulting
    Students will apply their statistical knowledge by analyzing data problems solicited from the Northfield community.
  • SOAN 233: Anthropology of Food
    This course explores how anthropologists use food to understand different aspects of human behavior. Students will work with the White Earth Band of Ojibwe to use food and culture in order to raise awareness about public health and nutrition.
  • PHIL 227: Philosophy with Children
    This course is about helping children explore and develop their nascent philosophical abilities via children's literature. To that end, the bulk of this course is devoted to making visits to a first grade class at Greenvale Park Elementary School.
  • EDUC 338: Multicultural Education
    This course focuses on the respect for human diversity, especially as these relate to various racial, cultural and economic groups, and to women.
  • MUSC 192: West African Drum Ensemble
    The ensemble will use indigenous instruments and an African approach to musical training in order to learn and perform rhythms and songs from West Africa. Students will perform at the Three Links Care Center.
  • RELG 289: Global Religions in Minnesota
    This course bridges theoretical knowledge with engaged field research focused on how Midwestern contexts shape global religious communities. Students will do independent research projects at various religious and spiritual sites throughout Minnesota.
  • AFAM 125: New African Migrations
    This course introduces students to African diaspora studies through an examination of new African migrations. Students will work with the Rural Immigration Project to complete research papers on topics relevant to Minnesotan Rural Migration.
  • SOAN 202: Girls Gone Bad: Women, Crime and Criminal Justice
    In this course we examine female criminality and learn about the ways in which criminal justice practices are gendered. Students will work on Wikipedia entries on women and crime.

Winter 2016

  • SOAN 262: Anthropology of Health and Illness
    An ethnographic approach to beliefs and practices regarding health and illness in numerous societies worldwide. Students will work with Healthfinders to create a survey for clients to self assess their health and life histories.
  • RELG 130: Native American Religions
    This course explores the history and contemporary practice of Native American religious traditions. Students will assist with setup and serve food at the monthly powwow at the American Indian Magnet School in St. Paul.
  • IDSC 198: FOCUS Colloquium
    This two-credit freshman colloquium will provide students with the opportunity to build air quality sensors to learn about the science around air pollution and to develop community based measurements.
  • ARBC 205: Intermediate Arabic
    Students will develop their ability to express ideas in Modern Standard Arabic by writing essays and preparing oral presentations. Students will spend one hour per week conversing with a Syrian grade school student.
  • CS 400: Integrative Exercise
    Beginning with the prototypes developed in the Senior Seminar, project teams will complete their project and present it to the department.
  • MUSC 192: West African Drum Ensemble
    The ensemble will use indigenous instruments and an African approach to musical training in order to learn and perform rhythms and songs from West Africa. Students will performed at several community gatherings.
  • EDUC 375: Issues in Science Education: Policy and Praxis
    This colloquium focuses on the pedagogy of science teaching, both in the United States and abroad. This course will also include active involvement with local schools and educators to ground it in lived practice.
  • SOAN 240: Methods of Social Research
    The course is concerned with social scientific inquiry and explanation. Students will create a survey to be used by Northfield Area United Way on company giving programs.
  • MATH 280: Statistical Consulting
    Students will apply their statistical knowledge by analyzing data problems solicited from the Northfield community. Instructor Permission Required, waitlist only
  • BIOL 310: Immunology
    This course will examine the role of the immune system in defense. Students will collaborate with Rice County Public Health to generate a patient brochure about links between the RSV virus and asthma for the public health nurses.
  • BIOL 101: Human Reproduction and Sexuality
    This course will review the basic biology of all aspects of reproduction. Students will develop and present a lesson plan for 6th and 7th grade classes on body image and puberty at Arcadia Charter School.

Fall 2015

  • EDUC 375: Issues in Science Education: Policy and Praxis
    This colloquium focuses on the pedagogy of science teaching, both in the United States and abroad. This course will also include active involvement with local schools and educators to ground it in lived practice.
  • HIST 232: Renaissance Worlds in France and Italy
    Using a range of evidence from Italy and France in the fourteenth-sixteenth centuries, students will explore selected issues of the period. Students will create an exhibit about rivers in conjunction with GEOL 210 and give tours of the exhibits.
  • MATH 255: Survey Sampling
    Covers sampling design issues beyond the basic simple random sample: stratification, clustering, domains, and complex designs like two-phase and multistage designs. Students will work on designing sampling design projects beyond the classroom.
  • RELG 243: Native American Religious Freedom
    This course explores historical and legal contexts in which Native Americans have practiced their religions. Service projects will integrate academic learning and student involvement in matters of concern to contemporary native communities.
  • MATH 280: Statistical Consulting
    Students will apply their statistical knowledge by analyzing data problems solicited from the Northfield community. Students will also learn basic consulting skills, including communication and ethics.
  • SPAN 204: Intermediate Spanish
    Students will work with first grade students at Greenvale Elementary School teaching math in Spanish and will also work with the Compañeros program helping students with reading and writing.
  • GEOL 210: Geomorphology
    Study of the geological processes and factors which influence the origin and development of the surficial features of the Earth. Students will create an exhibit about rivers in conjunction with HIST 232 and give tours of the exhibits.
  • EDUC 340: Race, Immigration, and Schools
    This course explores the important role that public schools have played as the way to socialize students about what it means to be American. Students will write a research brief for the Rural Immigration Network.
  • MUSC 192: West African Drum Ensemble
    The ensemble will use indigenous instruments and an African approach to musical training in order to learn and perform rhythms and songs from West Africa. Students will perform at the Three Links care center.

Spring 2015

  • SOAN 240: Methods of Social Research
    The course is concerned with social scientific inquiry and explanation, particularly with reference to sociology and anthropology.
  • GEOL 120.01: Introduction to Environmental Geology
    An introduction to geology emphasizing environmental health and humankind's use and abuse of soil, water, fuels, and other resources. Field trips and laboratories included.
  • WGST 240: Gender, Globalization, and War
    This course examines the relationship between globalization, gender and militarism to understand how globalization and militarism are gendered, and processes through which gender becomes globalized and militarized.
  • ARCN 246: Archaeological Methods
    This course provides a hands-on introduction to the entire archaeological process through classroom, field, and laboratory components.
  • MATH 349: Methods of Teaching Mathematics
    Methods of teaching mathematics in grades 7-12. Issues in contemporary mathematics education. Regular visits to school classrooms and teaching a class are required. Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing and permission of the instructor.
  • ARTS 330: Advanced Ceramics
    Students in this art course will create over 500 bowls for a yearly event to highlight the problems that hunger creates in society. The event is a fundraiser called Empty Bowls.
  • ENTS 288: Abrupt Climate Change
    The field of abrupt climate change seeks to understand very fast changes, or "tipping points," in historical climate records.
  • MATH 280: Statistical Consulting
    Students will apply their statistical knowledge by analyzing data problems solicited from the Northfield community. Instructor Permission Required, waitlist only
  • ARTS 330: Advanced Ceramics
    This course is a continuation of either or both beginning courses, focusing on sophisticated handbuilding and throwing techniques and advanced problem solving in ceramics.
  • PHIL 227: Philosophy of Education & Philosophy in Education
    This course looks at what it means to live an examined life while encouraging elementary school students to develop the skills of philosophical examination.
  • HIST 139: Foundations of Modern Europe
    A narrative and survey of the early modern period (fifteenth through eighteenth centuries).
  • HIST 216: History: Beyond the Walls
    This course will examine the world of history outside the walls of academia.
  • ENTS 110: Environment and Society
    This course offers an interdisciplinary introduction to a number of the pressing environmental changes currently facing human societies around the world.
  • EDUC 375: Issues in Science Education: Policy and Praxis
    This colloquium focuses on the pedagogy of science teaching, both in the United States and abroad. This course will also include active involvement with local schools and educators to ground it in lived practice.
  • HIST 126: African American History II
    The transition from slavery to freedom; the post-Reconstruction erosion of civil rights; protest organizations and mass migration before and during World War I; roots of the modern Civil Rights movement, black female activism, and more.

Winter 2015

  • MATH 280: Statistical Consulting
    In this two-credit course students will apply their statistical knowledge by analyzing data problems solicited from the Northfield community. Students will also learn basic consulting skills, including communication and ethics.
  • SOAN 285: The Ethics of Civic Engagement
    In this course, students will discuss the ethical questions that arise when they engage with others in research, service, organizing, or policy work.
  • RELG 243: Native American Religious Freedom
    This course explores historical and legal contexts in which Native Americans have practiced their religions in the U.S. Service projects integrate academic learning and student involvement in matters of concern to contemporary native communities.
  • MUSC 192: African Drum Ensemble
    The ensemble will use indigenous instruments and an African approach to musical training to learn and perform rhythms and songs from West Africa. Students perform and conduct a workshop for students at Prairie Creek Community School.
  • SOAN 262: Anthropology of Health and Illness
    This course examines patients, practitioners, and the social networks and contexts through which therapies are managed to better understand medical systems as well as the significance of the anthropological study of misfortune.
  • IDSC 236: Public Health in Practice
    This course is the second part of a two-term sequence. During the winter term, students will complete their final public health-related civic engagement project.
  • IDSC 298: Focus Sophomore Colloquium
    This one credit colloquium is designed for sophomore students participating in the Focusing on Cultivating Scientists program. It will provide an opportunity to participate in STEM-based projects on campus and in the community.
  • GEOL 340: Hydrology
    A seminar on major principles of ground and surface water hydrology and their application to contemporary hydrologic problems. The course will draw considerably on student-directed investigation of critical areas of study in hydrology.
  • HIST 280: African in the Arab World
    This course examines African people's existence as religious, political, and military leaders, and as slaves and poets in Arab societies from ancient to modern times.
  • EDUC 347: Methods of Teaching Science
    This course will explore teaching methods for the life and physical sciences in grades 5-12. Curricular materials and active learning labs will be discussed and developed.
  • ENTS 262: Materials Science, Energy, and Environment
    This course will focus on the relationship between the structure and physical properties of materials, how materials science can address environmental and energy challenges, and the technological and societal impacts of materials development.
  • BIOL 330: Immunology
    Topics to be covered include the structure and function of antibodies, cytokines, the role of the major histocompatibility complex in antigen presentation, cellular immunity, immunodeficiencies, and current techniques used to study immune responses.
  • BIOL 310: Immunology
    This course will examine the role of the immune system in defense, allergic reactions, and autoimmunity.
  • EDUC 353: Schooling and Opportunity in American Society
    This course is concerned with both the role of schools in society and the impact of society on schools. It deals with race, ethnicity, sex, social class and other factors which influence school achievement.
  • AMST 241: American Food?
    This course examines perceptions of American food within historical and global contexts.
  • CGSC 380: Seminar in Developmental Psychology: Cognitive Development During the Preschool Years
    We will consider the development of memory, perception, and attention, as well as concepts and categorization, problem-solving and thinking, during the years from two to six. Course includes regular observation of preschoolers or kindergarteners.

Fall 2014

  • CS 100: Human Centered Computing
    Technology permeates every aspect of our lives: how we work, play, and communicate; our finances and health; etc.
  • HIST 137: Early Medieval Worlds
    Through the intensive exploration of a variety of distinct "worlds" in the early Middle Ages, this course offers an introduction to formative political, social, religious, and cultural developments in Europe between c.450 and c.1050.
  • PHYS 355: Classical and Quantum Optics
    A junior/senior level course in classical and quantum optics. Students will take their knowledge about optics out into the community.
  • PHYS 100: Powering the Future: Renewable Energy in Context
    This A&I seminar provides an overview of the physics of energy harvesting at an introductory level. We also consider technological and socio-economic constraints as well as the environmental and sociological impact of different energy sources.
  • IDSC 235: Perspectives in Public Health
    This three credit s/cr/nc only course will explore the many dimensions of public health within the United States and provide an introduction to community based work and research.
  • IDSC 298: FOCUS Sophomore Colloquium
    This colloquium is designed for sophomore students participating in the FOCUS program. Students will continue a project at the Northfield Middle School monitoring air quality during high traffic periods, using a set of portable air monitors.
  • EDUC 375: Issues in Science Education: Policy and Praxis
    This two credit colloquium focuses on the pedagogy of science teaching, both in the United States and abroad.
  • RELG 130: Native American Religions
    This course explores the history and contemporary practice of Native American religious traditions, especially as they have developed amid colonization and resistance.
  • MATH 280: Statistical Consulting
    In this two credit s/cr/nc only course students will apply their statistical knowledge by analyzing data problems solicited from the Northfield community.
  • EDUC 234: Educational Psychology
    Human development and learning theories are studied in relation to the teaching-learning process and the sociocultural contexts of schools.
  • ENTS 215: Environmental Ethics
    This course is an introduction to the central ethical debates in environmental policy and practice, as well as some of the major traditions of environmental thought.
  • SPAN 204: Intermediate Spanish
    This course aims to help students acquire greater skill and confidence in both oral and written expression. The language classes team up with the Northfield public schools to help both Northfield and Carleton students improve their language skills.
  • BIOL 322: Ecosystem Ceology Laboratory
    In this lab students work with local farmers and ranchers to study the effects of land management and farming practices on soil and plant chemistry and the cycling of soil carbon and nitrogen.
  • GEOL 258: Geology of Soils
    The study of soil formation, and physical and chemical properties of soils especially as related to geomorphology and land use.

Spring 2014

  • IDSC 298: FOCUS Colloquium
    This two-credit sophomore colloquium will provide students with the opportunity to research light pollution and give public reports on their findings.
  • EDUC 375: Issues in Science Education: Policy and Praxis
    This colloquium focuses on the pedagogy of science teaching, both in the United States and abroad. This course will also include active involvement with local schools and educators to ground it in lived practice.
  • PHIL 243: Animal Ethics: The Moral Status of Animals
    Do non-human animals have moral status, or are our moral obligations confined to human animals? In this course, we will explore this and related questions in a hands-on and interdisciplinary way.
  • CS 342: Mobile Application Development
    In the context of a few app development projects, this course will focus on mobile computing's design patterns, user interface principles, software development methodologies, development tools, and cultural impact.
  • BIOL 236: Plant Biology
    How do plants work? This course is framed in the context of advances in evolution and genomics, which offer insight into physiological, developmental, morphological, and anatomical adaptations to diverse environments.
  • RELG 289: Global Religions in Minnesota
    This course examined how global religions adapt to and transform the disparate local communities where their practitioners make home. Students supplemented historical and theoretical instruction with research with living communities in Minnesota.
  • IDSC 198: FOCUS Colloquium
    This colloquium is designed to give students participating in the Focusing on Cultivating Scientists program an opportunity to learn and use skills in scientific study, reasoning, and modeling. Freshmen built tools to measure air pollution.
  • EDUC 340: Race, Immigration, and Urban Schools
    This course explores the important role that public schools, particularly in urban areas, have played in the American national imagination as the way to socialize students about what it means to be American.
  • SOAN 285: The Ethics of Civic Engagement
    In this course, students will discuss the ethical questions that arise when they engage with others in research, service, organizing, or policy work. Each student will take on a project based on their own interests.
  • MATH 280: Statistical Consulting
    Students will apply their statistical knowledge by analyzing data problems solicited from the Northfield community.
  • MATH 237: Designing a Curriculum for Math GED
    We will help local communities respond to the latest changes in GED requirements by observing how GED mathematics is currently taught and preparing new curricular materials to teach it in the future.
  • BIOL 101: Human Reproduction and Sexuality
    This course will review the basic biology of all aspects of reproduction, from genes to behavior, in an attempt to understand one of the more basic and important processes in nature. Students work on curriculum for local schools and Carleton campus.
  • PSYC 218: Hormones and Behavior
    In this course, students will learn about the relationship between hormones and behavior. In spring 2014, students produced short videos about hormones which they showed to middle school students and with whom they then had follow-up discussions.
  • ENTS 232: Research Methods in Environmental Studies
    This course covers various methodologies that are used to pursue interdisciplinary academic research relating to the environment. Students analyzed transportation challenges for Northfield middle schoolers and residents of Northfield Retirement Home.
  • PSYC 375: Language and Deception
    In this course we will examine deception and persuasion in language use. Students in this class actively participated in Intro to Psychology classes at the local high school.
  • BIOL 370: Topics in Virology
    The course focuses on the most recent developments in HIV-related research, including implications for HIV-treatment and vaccines and the impact of viral infection on the immune system of the host.
  • EDUC 386: Teaching Reading in the Content Areas
    The course provides a theoretical and practical foundation for helping secondary teachers learn to provide specific instructional support for secondary readers. Students will partner with students from the Prairie Creek Community School.
  • POSC 222: The Politics of Food: Producers, Consumers, and Citizenship
    In this course we will learn about and reflect upon the political aspects of food in the U.S. Students in this class researched food products and produced educational materials which they shared with the local coop.
  • BIOL 370: Seminar: Selected Topics in Virology
    An examination of selected animal viruses. The course will focus on the most recent developments in HIV-related research, including implications for HIV-treatment and vaccines and the impact of viral infection on the immune system of the host.
  • SOAN 202: Girls Gone Bad: Women, Crime, and Criminal Justice
    Students in the class will have the possibility of collaborating with the Rice County Corrections on projects or with the Alternatives to Violence Program currently running in the Faribault prison.
  • EDUC 395: Senior Seminar
    This is a research and design seminar for educational studies concentrators. It focuses on a contemporary issue in American education. In spring 2014, students investigated youth activism.

Winter 2014

  • MATH 280: Statistical Consulting
    Students will apply their statistical knowledge by analyzing data problems solicited from the Northfield community. Students will also learn basic consulting skills, including communication and ethics.
  • BIOL 310: Immunology
    Students are partnering with the MN Celiac Center and Northfield's Just Food Co-op on projects related to celiac disease.In partnership with the Rice County Public Health Department, students will be developing a video on the topic of vaccine safety.
  • EDUC 375: Issues in Science Education: Policy and Praxis
    This colloquium focuses on the pedagogy of science teaching, both in the United States and abroad. This course will also include active involvement with local schools and educators to ground it in lived practice.
  • BIOL 310: Immunology
    Students are with the MN Celiac Center and Northfield's Just Food Co-op on projects related to celiac disease.
  • EDUC 375: Issues in Science Education: Policy and Praxis
    This colloquium focuses on the pedagogy of science teaching, both in the United States and abroad.
  • SOAN 240: Methods of Social Research
    The class is working with the Northfield League of Women's voters. They will construct surveys and interview members in order to illustrate the composition of league, its perceptions in the community, and ways that they could improve recruitment.
  • SOAN 240: Methods of Social Research
    The class is working with the Northfield League of Women's voters. They will construct surveys and interview members in order to illustrate the composition of league, its perceptions in the community, and ways that they could improve recruitment.
  • PEAR 174: Introductory Coaching Practicum
    This practicum will culminate with a service-learning project in Seville offering free sports clinics to local schools. No previous coaching experience required.
  • PHYS 356: Special Project: Systems Approaches for Sustainability
    Students in this course are working on four projects related to sustainability including designing a net zero warming house, designing a low-energy/low-heat/low-water year-round greenhouse and a system for sustainability projects.
  • POSC 209: Place, Politics, and Citizen Mobilization
    This class will research a current case study of sand mining for fracking in Winona, Minnesota.
  • POSC 209: Place, Politics, and Ctizen Mobilization
    This class will research a current case study of sand mining for fracking in Winona, Minnesota.
  • PEAR 174: Introductory Coaching Practicum
    This practicum will culminate with a service-learning project in Seville offering free sports clinics to local schools. No previous coaching experience required.
  • EDUC 110: Introduction to Educational Studies
    Students in this course have the opportunity to enrich their learning through engagement with the community by volunteering at Faribault High School.
  • EDUC 238: Multicultural Education
    Students in this course have the opportunity to enrich their learning through engagement with the community by volunteering at Faribault High School.
  • EDUC 238: Multicultural Education
    Students in this course have the opportunity to enrich their learning through engagement with the community by volunteering at Faribault High School.
  • MUSC 192: African Drum Class
    Class instruction in basic techniques of African drumming. Students performed for Prairie Creek Community School.
  • MUSC 192: African Drum Class
    Class instruction in basic techniques of African drumming. Students performed for Prairie Creek Community School.
  • EDUC 110: Introduction to Educational Studies
    Students in this course have the opportunity to enrich their learning through engagement with the community by volunteering at Faribault High School.
  • MATH 280: Statistical Consulting
    Students will apply their statistical knowledge by analyzing data problems solicited from the Northfield community. Students will also learn basic consulting skills, including communication and ethics.
  • PHYS 356: Special Project: Systems Approaches for Sustainability
    Projects in this course: designing a net zero warming house, designing a low-energy/low-heat/low-water year-round greenhouse, a system for sustainability projects, and exploring ways to implement the Green Steps program for the City of Northfield.
  • ENGL 272: A Journey in Journalism
    In this workshop class, the classroom becomes a newsroom and students create and publish their own works of journalism in digital media of their choosing.Journalism as a truth-finding and truth-telling discipline is the underlying skill set taught.
  • ENTS 261: Field Investigation in Comparative Agroecology
    The course begins with a two-week visit in December to Beijing and Sichuan province. Field work will include visits to Chinese farms at the forefront of an incipient sustainable agriculture movement in China.
  • IDSC 198: FOCUS Colloquium
    This two-credit freshman colloquium will provide students with the opportunity to build air quality sensors to learn about the science around air pollution and to develop community based measurements.
  • IDSC 198: FOCUS Colloquium
    This two-credit freshman colloquium will provide students with the opportunity to build air quality sensors to learn about the science around air pollution and to develop community based measurements.
  • ENGL 272: A Journey in Journalism
    In this workshop class, the classroom becomes a newsroom and students create and publish their own works of journalism in digital media of their choosing including personal blogs, podcasts, videos, still photography, online graphics and multimedia.
  • ENTS 261: Field Investigation in Comparative Agroecology
    The course begins with a two-week visit in December to Beijing and Sichuan province. Field work will include visits to Chinese farms at the forefront of an incipient sustainable agriculture movement in China.
  • IDSC 265: Topics in Public Health
    Topics in Public Health will mix introductory text-based discussions with panels and discussions facilitated by visiting speakers.
  • HIST 216: History: Beyond the Walls
    A central component of the course includes a civic engagement project mentoring sixth grade students at the Northfield Middle School as they research and produce projects for Minnesota History Day.
  • IDSC 265: Topics in Public Health
    This course will mix introductory text-based discussions with panels and discussions facilitated by visiting speakers. Classes will cover an array of topics including community partnership, professionalism, and social theories of health equity.
  • HIST 216: History Beyond the Walls
    A central component of the course includes a civic engagement project mentoring sixth grade students at the Northfield Middle School as they research and produce projects for Minnesota History Day.

Fall 2013

  • HIST 232: Renaissance Worlds in France and Italy
    Using a range of evidence from Italy and France in the fourteenth-sixteenth centuries we will explore selected issues of the period. Students will go to local schools to lead an enrichment opportunity around Shakespeare’s play Twelfth Night.
  • CGSC 386: Adolescent Cognitive Development: Developing an Identity and Life Plans
    An examination of recent literature on how adolescents develop their value system, explore their goals, begin to make life-framing decision, establish new relationships, and discover answers to the question "Who am I?"
  • EDUC 234: Educational Psychology
    Human development and learning theories are studied in relation to the teaching-learning process and the sociocultural contexts of school. Three hours outside of class per week are devoted to observing learning activities in public school classrooms.
  • BIOL 221: Ecosystem Ecology
    This course examines major ecosystems on Earth. Students will be collaborate with the Main Stream Project to do analysis of the effects of sustainable chicken production and develop units for a middle school field trip to the Arboretum.
  • AMST 252: Food Culture in the United States
    We explore the creation, exchange, and consumption of food in America, focusing on food as a cultural artifact that is intricately tied to individual and group identification. The class will partner with Northfield Community Action Center Food Shelf.
  • ENTS 215: Environmental Ethics
    This course is an introduction to the central ethical debates in environmental policy and practice.The course allows students apply the ethical debates in environmental policy and practice to case studies in Northfield.
  • MATH 315: Topics in Probability and Statistics: Introduction to Sampling Techniques
    Covers sampling design issues beyond the basic simple random sample: stratification, clustering, domains, and complex designs like two-phase and multistage designs.
  • PSYC 260: Health Psychology
    This course will examine how psychological principles can be employed to promote and maintain health, prevent and treat illness, and encourage adherence to disease treatment regimens. Students will examine local policy and health outcomes.
  • GEOL 210: Geomorphology
    Study of the geological processes and factors which influence the origin and development of the surficial features of the earth, with an emphasis on some or all of the processes in Minnesota.
  • PSYC 260: Health Psychology
    This course will examine how psychological principles can be employed to promote and maintain health, prevent and treat illness, and encourage adherence to disease treatment regimens.
  • SOAN 203: Anthropology of Good Intentions
    This course explores the impacts of sustainable development, conservation, and AID programs to look beyond the good intentions of those that implement them.
  • EDUC 110: Introduction to Educational Studies
    This course will focus on education as a multidisciplinary field of study. We will explore the meanings of education within individual lives and institutional contexts. Students have the option of spending time in one of the after-school programs.
  • CAMS 270: Nonfiction I
    This course addresses nonfiction media as both art form and historical practice by exploring the expressive, rhetorical, and political possibilities of nonfiction production. The class will create a film about composting at Carleton.
  • MATH 280: Statistical Consulting
    Students will apply their statistical knowledge by analyzing data problems solicited from the Northfield community. Students will also learn basic consulting skills, including communication and ethics.

Spring 2013

  • SOAN 236: Introduction to Peace Studies
    In this course we will study the alternative definitions of peace and examine the relation between peace and a variety of societal factors including modernity, post modernity, international anarchy, forms of state, and culture.
  • SOAN 285: Ethics of Civic Engagement
    In this course, students will discuss the ethical questions that arise when they engage with others in research, service, organizing, or policy work. Each student will take on a project based on their own interests.
  • ARTS 330: Advanced Ceramics
    Students in this art course will create over 500 bowls for a yearly event, Empty Bowls, to highlight the problems that hunger creates in society. The event includes a fundraiser selling the handmade bowls for the Northfield Food Shelf.
  • EDUC 386: Teaching Reading in the Content Areas
    The course provides a theoretical and practical foundation for helping secondary teachers learn to provide specific instructional support for secondary readers. Students will partner with students from a local school to work on reading skills.
  • HIST 115: Carleton in the Archives: Studies in Institutional Memory and Culture
    What is the relationship between "official" and "individual" memory in the making of an institutional world? We will explore this and related questions through reading, discussion, and a hands-on project based on materials in Carleton's own archives.
  • ENTS 288: Abrupt Climate Change
    Course topics include interpretation of historical climate data, methods of measuring abrupt changes in ancient climates, theories for abrupt change, the role of complex earth systems, and the connection to trends in global climate change.
  • POSC 233: Food Justice
    This course will examine concepts of justice and apply them to issues related to farm workers, factory workers and others who produce our food, poverty and access to food, and genetically modified organisms as they relate to control of production.
  • RELG 289: Global Religions in Minnesota
    This course examined how global religions adapt to and transform the disparate local communities where their practitioners make home. Students supplemented historical and theoretical instruction with research with living communities in Minnesota.
  • POSC 223: Food Justice
    This course will examine concepts of justice and apply them to issues related to farmworkers, factory works and others who produce our food, poverty and access to food, and genetically modified organisms as they relate to control of production.
  • HIST 285: Museums, Monuments, and Memory
    This course ranges widely over the varied and sometimes risky terrain of contemporary history-making in Minnesota and beyond to examine preservation organizations, museums, archives, oral history projects, documentary films, historic sites, and more.
  • EDUC 395: Senior Seminar
    This is a research and design seminar for educational studies concentrators. The academic civic engagement component for this class will focus on charter schools.
  • ENGL 272: A Journey in Journalism
    In this workshop-style class in journalistic storytelling, the classroom becomes a newsroom and students become working journalists reporting on Carleton and Northfield events as well as broader social issues, personalities, and trends.

Winter 2013

  • SOAN 262: Anthropology of Health and Illness
    This course examines patients, practitioners, and the social networks and contexts through which therapies are managed to better understand medical systems as well as the significance of the anthropological study of misfortune.
  • ENTS 262: Materials Science, Energy and the Environment
    This course will focus on the relationship between the structure and physical properties of materials, how materials science can address environmental and energy challenges, and the technological and societal impacts of materials development.
  • SOAN 240: Methods of Social Research
    Topics covered include research design, data collection, and analysis of data. Both quantitative and qualitative methods are considered. Student will demonstrate their knowledge by developing a research proposal that is implementable.
  • BIOL 302: Methods of Teaching Science
    This course will explore teaching methods for the life and physical sciences in grades 5-12. In addition, time outside of class will be spent observing and teaching in local science classrooms.
  • BIOL 310: Immunology
    This course will examine the role of the immune system in defense, allergic reactions, and autoimmunity.
  • HIST 236: Women's Lives in Pre-Modern Europe
    This course offers an exploration of women's place in the family and economy, laws and cultural assumptions about women, and women's role in religion.
  • HIST 286: Africans in the Arab World: On Site and Revisited
    This class promotes dialogue with Afro-Arab women around the historical constructions of gender, race, and ethnicity in heritage sites, Islam, Arab media, academic institutions, and popular culture.

Fall 2012

  • POSC 204: Media and Electoral Politics: 2012 United States Election
    Our analysis of media influences on politics will draw from three fields of study: political psychology, political behavior and participation, and public opinion.
  • GEOL 210: Geomorphology
    Study of the geological processes and factors which influence the origin and development of the surficial features of the earth, with an emphasis on some or all of the processes in Minnesota.
  • POSC 230: Methods of Political Research
    An introduction to research method, research design, and the analysis of political data. The course is intended to introduce students to the fundamentals of scientific inquiry as they are employed in the discipline.
  • EDUC 234: Educational Psychology
    Human development and learning theories are studied in relation to the teaching-learning process and the sociocultural contexts of schools.
  • POSC 358: Comparative Social Movements
    This course examines the role that social movements play in political life. Potential case studies include the transnational environmental movement, religious movements in Latin America and the recent growth of far right activism in northern Europe.
  • POSC 100: Media and Election Politics: 2012 Election
    This seminar introduces basic methods of political analysis through a case study of media and politics in the 2012 elections. Concepts from public opinion analysis and political psychology will be used to understand the 2012 campaigns.
  • HIST 137: Early Medieval Worlds
    Through the exploration of four "worlds" in the Middle Ages (Late Antique Italy, Anglo-Saxon England,Carolingian Europe, Holy Roman Empire)this course gives an introduction to political,social, and cultural developments in Europe between 250 and 1050
  • ENTS 247: Agroforestry Systems: Local and Global Perspectives
    This course will examine the principles and practices of tropical and temperate agroforestry systems.

Spring 2012

  • BIOL 236: Plant Biology
    This course is framed in the context of advances in evolution and genomics, which offer insight into physiological, developmental, morphological, and anatomical adaptations to diverse environments.
  • SOAN 285: Ethics of Civic Engagement
    In this course, students will discuss the ethical questions that arise when they engage with others in research, service, organizing, or policy work.
  • ENTS 310: Environmental Law and Policy
    This seminar aims to understand how environmental laws work to achieve policy objectives, with attention also to debates about the role of markets and community-based environmental management.
  • POSC 288: Washington D.C.: A Global Conversation
    Students will participate in a seminar involving meetings with leading Washington figures in areas of global policy making and regular discussions of related readings.
  • POSC 289: Washington D.C.: A Global Conversation
    Students will engage with leading scholars and practitioners in the field of political communication to learn how mass media, particularly TV news, influences politics.
  • PSYC 375: Language and Deception
    In this course we will examine deception and persuasion in language use. We will take up three main issues: what it means to deceive and how people deceive others through language, why people deceive, and the ethics of deception.
  • CLAS 244: The Oresteia Project: Visualizing Greek Tragedy
    The course focused on Aeschylus' famous tragic trilogy as an entry-point into and case study of the production, both ancient and modern, of Greek drama.
  • RELG 289: Global Religions of Minnesota
    This course bridges theoretical knowledge with engaged field research focused on how Midwestern contexts shape global religious communities and how these communities challenge and transform Minnesota.
  • EDUC 395: Senior Seminar
    This is a research and design seminar for educational studies concentrators. It focuses on a contemporary issue in American education.
  • EDUC 386: Teaching Reading in the Content Areas
    The course provides a theoretical and practical foundation for helping secondary teachers learn to provide specific instructional support for secondary readers.
  • BIOL 370: Topics in Virology
    An examination of selected animal viruses. The course will focus on the most recent developments in HIV-related research, including implications for HIV-treatment and vaccines and the impact of viral infection on the immune system of the host.
  • FREN 349: The French Art of Living: Tradition, Myth, Reality
    Through literature, art, architecture, and theory, students will explore French notions of what it means to live well, from Renaissance sumptuousness to existentialist questioning to the depiction of immigrants’ lives in contemporary Paris.
  • MATH 215: Introduction to Statistics
    Practical aspects of statistics, including extensive use of statistical software, interpretation and communication of results, will be emphasized.
  • CLAS 111: Classical Mythology
    We will study a selection of the most famous Classical myths through close reading of Homer, the Greek tragedians, Ovid and other ancient sources.
  • ARTS 330: Advanced Ceramics
    This course is a continuation of either or both beginning courses, focusing on sophisticated handbuilding and throwing techniques and advanced problem solving in ceramics.
  • SOAN 240: Methods of Social Research
    The course is concerned with social scientific inquiry and explanation, particularly with reference to sociology and anthropology.
  • POSC 209: Place, Politics, and Citizen Mobilization
    We will explore concepts of democracy, power, identity, and sense of place as we examine cases of citizen mobilization. The class will research a current case study of an environmental controversy that gave rise to citizen mobilization.

Winter 2012

  • EDUC 238: Multicultural Education
    This course focuses on the respect for human diversity, especially as these relate to various racial, cultural and economic groups, and to women.
  • BIOL 310: Immunology
    This course will examine the role of the immune system in defense, allergic reactions, and autoimmunity.
  • DANC 255: Performing Politics
    We will investigate ways in which contemporary politics can influence the creation of performance work. We will explore individual identity and community-based art as inspirations for making new performance material.
  • HIST 245: Ireland: The Origin of the Troubles
    This course examines Irish history with a special focus on Anglo-Irish relations from Tudor colonization through the Great Hunger of the nineteenth century.
  • SOAN 262: Anthropology of Health and Illness
    An ethnographic approach to beliefs and practices regarding health and illness in numerous societies worldwide.
  • BIOL 101: Human Reproduction and Sexuality
    This course will review the basic biology of all aspects of reproduction--from genes to behavior--in an attempt to better understand one of the more basic and important processes in nature.
  • ENTS 261: Field Investigation in Comparative Agroecology
    The course begins with a two-week visit in December to Beijing and Sichuan province. Field work will include visits to Chinese farms as well as discussions with Chinese sustainable agriculture researchers.
  • SOAN 236: Introduction to Peace Studies
    In this course we will study the alternative definitions of peace and examine the relation between peace and a variety of societal factors including modernity, post modernity, patriarchy, ecology, globalization and a global civil society and culture.

Fall 2011

  • ECON 266: Experimental Economics
    This course will provide an introduction to experimental methodology, with an emphasis on design and hypothesis testing.
  • EDUC 340: Race, Immigration, and Urban Schools
    This course explores the role that public schools have played in the American national imagination as the way to socialize students about what it means to be American and to prepare them to participate as citizens in a democracy.
  • SOAN 285: Ethics of Civic Engagement
    In this course, students will discuss the ethical questions that arise when they engage with others in research, service, organizing, or policy work.
  • SPAN 204: Intermediate Spanish
    This course aims to help students acquire greater skill and confidence in both oral and written expression. The language classes team up with the Northfield public schools to help both Northfield and Carleton students improve their language skills.
  • RELG 276: Nonviolent Social Change: Theory and Praxis
    This class will give attention to the historical conditions that led to the emergence of the theory of nonviolence and the nonviolent activist tradition, and analyze the development of theories of nonviolent social change.
  • SPAN 204: Intermediate Spanish
    This course aims to help students acquire greater skill and confidence in both oral and written expression. The language classes team up with the Northfield public schools to help both Northfield and Carleton students improve their language skills.
  • CAMS 275: Audio Workshop
    The Audio Workshop introduces students to essential skills in audio storytelling and drama. Students will produce projects in three essential genres: reportorial projects, personal narratives and new audio drama.
  • IDSC 100: Measured Thinking: Reasoning with Numbers about World Events, Health, Science, and Social Issues
    This interdisciplinary course addresses one of the signal features of contemporary academic, professional, public, and personal life: a reliance on information and arguments involving numbers.
  • GEOL 258: Geology of Soils
    The study of soil formation, and physical and chemical properties of soils especially as related to geomorphology and land use.
  • HIST 282: Masquerades in Africa
    This course explores the relevance of masks, animated in masquerade performances, to the practice of reconstructing the African past.
  • BIOL 221: Ecosystems Ecology
    This course examines major ecosystems on Earth, including terrestrial, wetland, lake, river, estuarine, and marine systems.
  • CGSC 385: Cognitive Development in Middle Childhood
    We will consider the development of memory, perception, and attention, as well as concepts and categorization, problem-solving and thinking, during the years from six to 11.
  • MATH 115: Statistics: Concepts and Applications
    Introduction to statistical concepts with emphasis on understanding and interpretation of statistical information, especially in the context of media reports and scholarly articles.
  • PSYC 260: Health Psychology
    This course will examine how psychological principles can be employed to promote and maintain health, prevent and treat illness, and encourage adherence to disease treatment regimens.
  • EDUC 234: Educational Psychology
    Human development and learning theories are studied in relation to the teaching-learning process and the sociocultural contexts of schools.

Spring 2011

  • EDUC 365: Democracy, Diversity, and Education
    A junior-level seminar, the course will examine various theories about the relationship between democracy and education and the role of American public schools in creating a citizenry for a democratic society.
  • WGST 250: Women's Health Activism
    This course focuses on women's health movements and feminist activism around reproductive justice in the United States.
  • SOAN 215: Social Welfare
    The course reviews the historical, social, and cultural underpinnings of the nation's welfare system and examines which groups are served and not served by the system.
  • SOAN 236: Introduction to Peace Studies
    In this course we will study the alternative definitions of peace and examine the relation between peace and a variety of societal factors including modernity, post modernity, religious prejudice, ecology, and a global civil society and culture.
  • AMST 252: Ethnic Foodways in the U.S.
    This course explores the creation, exchange, and consumption of ethnic foodways in the United States. In particular, we look at food as a cultural artifact that is intricately tied to individual and group identification with ancestry and traditions.
  • RELG 281: Art, Religion and Globalization
    Tracing the history of exhibiting cultures, beginning in the late nineteenth century, we will consider how religions and traditions are represented in different contexts with a range of political and social implications.
  • MATH 315: Topics in Probability and Statistics
    Introduction to the main discrete and continuous time stochastic processes. Topics include Markov chains, Poisson process, continuous time Markov chains, Brownian motion.
  • MATH 349: Methods of Teaching Mathematics
    Methods of teaching mathematics in grades 7-12. Issues in contemporary mathematics education. Regular visits to school classrooms and teaching a class are required.
  • ARTS 330: Advanced Ceramics
    This course is a continuation of either or both beginning courses, focusing on sophisticated handbuilding and throwing techniques and advanced problem solving in ceramics.
  • ENTS 329: Environmental Analysis Lab
    In this course, we will study the chemistry of molecules in the air, water, and soil. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the chemistry in the natural (unpolluted) environment, and the changes which occur due to human activity and pollution.
  • ENTS 246: Environmental and Agricultural Politics of the Americas
    We will explore policies and political institutions relating to the environment--and particularly agriculture--in North and South America.
  • BIOL 234: Microbiology
    A study of the metabolism, genetics, structure, and function of microorganisms. While presented in the framework of the concepts of cellular and molecular biology, the emphasis will be on the uniqueness and diversity of the microbial world.
  • RELG 243: Native American Religious Freedom
    This course explores historical and legal contexts in which Native Americans have practiced their religions in the United States.
  • BIOL 236: Plant Biology
    This course is framed in the context of advances in evolution and genomics, which offer insight into physiological, developmental, morphological, and anatomical adaptations to diverse environments.

Winter 2011

  • ECON 268: Economic Cost-Benefit Analysis
    This course will cover the basic theory and empirical techniques necessary to quantify and aggregate the impacts of government policy, especially as related to the environment.
  • RELG 289: Global Religions in Minnesota
    This course bridges theoretical knowledge with engaged field research focused on how Midwestern contexts shape global religious communities and how these communities challenge and transform Minnesota.
  • BIOL 310: Immunology
    This course will examine the role of the immune system in defense, allergic reactions, and autoimmunity.
  • AMST 127: Introduction to Latina/o Studies
    Utilizing an interdisciplinary framework, this course will discuss the emergence of Latina/o studies in the academy and its relationship to community activism.
  • SOAN 275: Community Needs Assessment
    This course introduces students to different approaches to assessing a community's needs and to social program evaluation.
  • HIST 280: African in the Arab World
    This course examines African people's existence as religious, political, and military leaders, and as slaves and poets in Arab societies from ancient to modern times.
  • SOAN 285: Ethics of Civic Engagement
    In this course, students will discuss the ethical questions that arise when they engage with others in research, service, organizing, or policy work.
  • CAMS 285: Community Video
    In this course students will focus on non-fiction structure, story, and production techniques as they create video projects working in collaboration with Northfield area non-profit organizations.
  • EDUC 238: Multicultural Education
    This course focuses on the respect for human diversity, especially as these relate to various racial, cultural and economic groups, and to women.

Fall 2010

  • EDUC 110: Introduction to Educational Studies
    Students in this course have the opportunity to enrich their learning through engagement with the community by volunteering at Faribault High School.
  • EDUC 234: Educational Psychology
    Human development and learning theories are studied in relation to the teaching-learning process and the sociocultural contexts of schools. Students complete 3 hours of classroom observation at local schools each week.
  • POSC 358: Comparative Social Movements
    This course will examine the role that social movements play in political life.
  • GEOL 100: Geology in the Field
    This course introduces basic principles of geology and geological reasoning through first-hand field work. Using their field work, students piece together the long geologic history of southern Minnesota. Findings will be presented to the public.
  • SPAN 204: Intermediate Spanish
    Each Fall, sections of Spanish 204 include a hands-on learning opportunity for students and the Northfield community. Each Carleton student works 1-on-1 with a local Northfield student, engaging in conversations in Spanish and tutoring the student.
  • RELG 130: Native American Religion
    This course explores the history and contemporary practice of Native American religious traditions, especially as they have developed amid colonization and resistance.
  • ENTS 215: Environmental Ethics
    This course is an introduction to the central ethical debates in environmental policy and practice, as well as some of the major traditions of environmental thought.
  • ENTS 120: Introduction to Geospatial Analysis
    Spatial data analysis using Geographic Information Systems (GIS), remote sensing, global positioning, and related technologies are increasingly important for understanding and analyzing a wide range of biophysical, social, and economic phenomena.
  • CHEM 100: Air Pollution and Human Health
    This course begins with an overview of the interdisciplinary science of air pollutants. Questions such as the relationship between childhood asthma and air quality and the relative impacts of possible strategies to mitigate pollution will be studied

Spring 2010

  • ARTS 330: Advanced Ceramics
    This course is an advanced ceramics class for studio art majors. Students created bowls that were sold at Spring Concert and also in Northfield to raise money for a local charity.
  • PSYC 375: Language and Deception
    In this course we will examine deception and persuasion in language use.
  • SOAN 285: Ethics of Civic Engagement
    In this course, students will discuss the ethical questions that arise when they engage with others in research, service, organizing, or policy work.
  • ENTS 215: Environmental Ethics
    This course is an introduction to the central ethical debates in environmental policy and practice, as well as some of the major traditions of environmental thought.
  • POSC 220: The Politics of Food
    In this course we will learn about and reflect upon the political aspects of food in the U.S. Topics include food history, agribusiness, local food movements, food policy, and social justice.
  • EDUC 340: Race, Immigration, and Urban Schools
    This course explores the important role that public schools, particularly in urban areas, play in the American national imagination as the way to socialize students about what it means to be American and to participate as citizens in a democracy.

Winter 2010

  • RELG 265: Modern Hinduism
    This course will begin with the ideas of such prominent Hindu thinkers as Rammohan Ray, Vivekananda, Savarkar, and Gandhi, looking to a range of historical and critical materials to ground their voices in the experience of colonialism.
  • PSYC 260: Health Psychology
    This course will examine how psychological principles can be employed to promote and maintain health, prevent and treat illness, and encourage adherence to disease treatment regimens.
  • POSC 209: Place, Politics, and Ctizen Mobilization
    Citizen mobilization often centers around environmental problems or other controversies about the shape of community landscapes. We will explore concepts of democracy, power, identity, and sense of place as we examine cases of citizen mobilization
  • RELG 268: Encountering Islam
    This course explores discourses that emerged as Islamic traditions encountered other cultures. Students will also explore Minnesota's varied Muslim populations and the nuances in contemporary American encounters with Islam.
  • ENTS 271: Environmental Economics and Policy
    This course will explore the economic and political institutions affecting the environment. Topics to be discussed may include: climate change, agriculture, transportation, energy efficiency, population growth, and water.
  • SOAN 395: Public Sociology
    Students in this course conducted needs-based assessments of Northfield and the Rice Country area to identify potential projects and collaborations between Carleton and local organizations.
  • SOAN 262: Anthropology of Health and Illness
    For this course, some students worked with Growing Up Healthy to conduct library-based research on subpopulations such as Faribault's Somali population and issues such as refugee mental health and culturally specific presentation of symptoms.
  • BIOL 310: Immunology
    This course will examine the role of the immune system in defense, allergic reactions, and autoimmunity. Topics to be covered include the structure and function of antibodies, cytokines, and more.
  • SOAN 111: Introduction to Sociology
    An introduction to sociology, including analysis of the sociological perspective, culture, socialization, demography, and social class and caste institutions in modern industrial societies and cultures.
  • EDUC 395: Educational Studies Senior Seminar
    This is a research and design seminar for educational studies concentrators. It focuses on a contemporary issue in American education. Students volunteered with various non-profit agencies and studied service-learning
  • FREN 241: Marginality and Renaissance
    This course will examine the Francophone presence in Quebec, Louisiana and Acadia through works of novels, plays, songs, films and folktales.

Fall 2009

  • GEOL 210: Geomorphology
    Study of the geological processes and factors which influence the origin and development of the superficial features of the earth, with an emphasis on some or all of the processes in Minnesota.
  • ENTS 288: Abrupt Climate Change
    Course topics include interpretation of historical climate data, methods of measuring abrupt changes in ancient climates, theories for abrupt change, the role of complex earth systems, and the connection to trends in global climate change.
  • BIOL 370: Topics in Virology
    An examination of selected animal viruses. The course will focus on the most recent developments in HIV-related research, including implications for HIV-treatment and vaccines and the impact of viral infection on the immune system of the host.
  • ENTS 120: Introduction to Geospatial Analysis
    Spatial data analysis using Geographic Information Systems (GIS), remote sensing, global positioning, and related technologies are increasingly important for understanding and analyzing a wide range of biophysical, social, and economic phenomena.
  • HIST 139: Foundations of Modern Europe
    A narrative and survey of the early modern period (fifteenth through eighteenth centuries). The course examines the Renaissance, Reformation, Contact with the Americas, the Scientific Revolution and Enlightenment.
  • ENGL 109: English Writing Seminar
    Devoted exclusively to the study and practice of clear and persuasive prose, this course is designed to introduce students to the fundamental organizational and argumentative skills they need to write effectively at Carleton.
  • ENGL 109: English Writing Seminar
    Devoted exclusively to the study and practice of clear and persuasive prose, this course is designed to introduce students to the fundamental organizational and argumentative skills they need to write effectively at Carleton.
  • RELG 243: Native American Religions
    This course explores historical and legal contexts in which Native Americans have practiced their religions in the United States exploring landmark court cases in Sacred Lands, Peyotism, Free Exercise in prisons, and more.
  • CAMS 310: Moviegoing and Film Exhibtion in America
    In this course, we will familiarize ourselves with the various methodologies for doing film history while researching and writing the history of movie culture at the local level, using primary sources such as newspapers, interviews, and photographs.
  • SPAN 204: Intermediate Spanish
    Sections of Spanish 204 include a hands-on learning opportunity for students and the Northfield community. Each Carleton student will work 1-on-1 with a local Northfield student, engaging in conversations in Spanish while tutoring the student
  • ENGL 272: Truth Vs. Power: A Journey in Journalism
    In this workshop class, the classroom becomes a newsroom and students create and publish their own works of journalism in digital media of their choosing including but not limited to personal blogs, podcasts, and videos.

Spring 2009

  • EDUC 395: Educational Studies Senior Seminar
    This course focuses on a contemporary issue in American education. Recent seminars have been on educational reform and reformers, service learning, literacy leaders in education, education and the emotions, and personal essays about education.
  • ARTH 309: Historic Preservation
    This five-week seminar will provide a general introduction to the topic of historic preservation. We will study the evolution of the field and consider theoretical and legal issues pertaining to the selective maintenance of the built environment.
  • PSYC 375: Language and Deception
    In this course we will examine deception and persuasion in language use.
  • GEOL 258: Geology of Soils
    The study of soil formation, and physical and chemical properties of soils especially as related to geomorphology and land use. Laboratories and field trips will emphasize how to describe and interpret soils.
  • ARTS 330: Advanced Ceramics
    This course focuses on sophisticated handbuilding and throwing techniques and advanced problem solving in ceramics. Development of a personal voice is encouraged through open-ended assignments deepening exploration into the expressive nature of clay.
  • CAMS 270: Nonfiction Video Production
    This course addresses nonfiction media as both art form and historical practice. The class culminates in the production of a significant nonfiction media project.
  • PSYC 260: Health Psychology
    This course will examine how psychological principles can be employed to promote and maintain health, prevent and treat illness, and encourage adherence to disease treatment regimens.

Winter 2009

  • SOAN 395: Public Sociology
    Students in this course conducted needs-based assessments of Northfield and the Rice Country area to identify potential projects and collaborations between Carleton and local organizations related to arts, business, and housing.

Winter 2006

  • AMST 127: Introduction to Latina/o Studies
    Utilizing an interdisciplinary framework, this course will discuss the emergence of Latina/o studies in the academy and its relationship to community activism.

Theoretical ACE

Spring 2018

  • Educational Studies Senior Seminar
    This is a research and design seminar for educational studies concentrators. It focuses on a contemporary issue in American education.
  • Democracy and Dictatorship
    An introduction to the array of different democratic and authoritarian political institutions in both developing and developed countries.
  • Mapping the World Before Mercator
    Students will examine the functions and forms of medieval European and Islamic maps and then look closely at the continuities and transformations in map-making during the period of European exploration.
  • Civic Engagement, Social Change, and the Participatory Video
    Students will understand how to produce an effective short participatory video, and learn practical tools and techniques used in visual persuasion—an essential learning outcome for an era in which video/image consumption is growing exponentially.
  • The Ethics of Civic Engagement
    In this course, students will discuss the ethical questions that arise when they engage with others in research, service, organizing, or policy work.

Winter 2018

  • Student Conversations about Diversity and Community
    Students complete readings and engage in experiential exercises that invite them to reflect on their own social identities and their attitudes toward race, gender, class, and sexuality.
  • Contemporary Issues in Critical Criminology
    Students focus on the United States with topics including white collar crime, racial disparities in the criminal justice system, mass incarceration and other transformations in punishment, prisoner reentry, and the risk of recidivism.
  • Democracy and Dictatorship
    An introduction to the array of different democratic and authoritarian political institutions in both developing and developed countries.

Fall 2017

  • U.S. Consumer Culture
    Students will explore the development of consumer culture through such topics as advertising and mass media, the body and sexuality, consumerist politics in the labor movement, and the response to the Americanization of consumption abroad.
  • Talking about Diversity
    This course prepares students to facilitate peer-led conversations about diversity in the Critical Conversations Program.
  • Global-Local Commons: Sustainability, Diversity & Self-Gov't in Complex Social-Ecological Systems
    This course introduces students to the study of commons, particularly natural resources commons. The dilemmas of commons governance often reveal links between "governments" and "governance" as well as the global stakes of bettering local livelihoods.
  • Hinduism: An Introduction
    This survey course introduces students to this great variety, including social structures, rituals and scriptures, mythologies and epics, philosophies, life practices, politics, poetry, sex, gender, Bollywood, and some 330 million gods and goddesses.
  • Democracy and Dictatorship
    An introduction to the array of different democratic and authoritarian political institutions in both developing and developed countries.

Spring 2017

  • History Beyond the Walls
    This course will examine the world of history outside the walls of academia. Looking at secondary-school education, museums, and public policy, we will explore the ways in which both general and specialized publics learn and think about history.
  • Exile in Literature and History
    This course examines four different moments in the history of Spanish exile: the mass expulsion of Jews in 1492, that of Moors converted to Christianity in 1609, the Liberal exile in 1823, and the Republican exile in 1939.
  • The Political and Cultural History of the Cuban Revolution
    This course studies the political and historical background that sustained the Cuban revolution. We will read historical, political, philosophical, and cultural texts to understand this process and the fascination that it commanded around the world.
  • The Ethics of Civic Engagement
    In this course, students will discuss the ethical questions that arise when they engage with others in research, service, organizing, or policy work.
  • Democracy and Dictatorship
    An introduction to the array of different democratic and authoritarian political institutions in both developing and developed countries.
  • African American History II
  • EDUC Senior Seminar
    This seminar focuses on a contemporary issue in American education. Some off campus work with public school students and teachers is an integral part of the seminar.
  • Economics of the Public Sector
    This course provides a theoretical and empirical examination of the government's role in the U.S. economy. Emphasis is placed on policy analysis using the criteria of efficiency and equity.

Winter 2017

  • India Program: Civic Engagement in India
    This course will facilitate positive, respectful, and reciprocal relationships between Carleton students and people in India. Students will work with community groups that support local visions for an equitable and sustainable society.
  • Art as an Instrument for Change
    This course is designed for students with a desire to discover and experiment with their creative capacity, as well as those eager to use it as a tool for reflection on the current world, the past and the future.
  • The Contemporary Spanish Fictional Essay
    In this course, we will study the various meanings of what has been labeled, aesthetically and sociologically, as the Post-Modernist age, or Late Modernity.
  • We've Never Not Been Here: Indigenous Peoples and Places
    This interdisciplinary course offers an introduction to important topics in the field of Native American Studies.
  • Contemporary Issues in Critical Criminology
    This course examines contemporary criminological issues from a critical, sociological perspective.
  • Student Conversations about Diversity and Community
    In this course, students participate in peer-led conversations about diversity and community at Carleton.

Fall 2016

  • POSC 120: Democracy and Dictatorship
    An introduction to the array of different democratic and authoritarian political institutions in both developing and developed countries.
  • Democracy and Dictatorship
    An introduction to the array of different democratic and authoritarian political institutions in both developing and developed countries. We explore many key issues in contemporary politics such as nationalism and independence movements.
  • Talking About Diversity
    In this course, students learn about categories and theories related to social identity, power, and inequality, and explore how race, gender, class, and sexual orientation affect individual experience and communal structures.
  • ECON 270: Economics of the Public Sector
    This course provides a theoretical and empirical examination of the government's role in the U.S. economy.
  • U.S. Consumer Culture
    We will explore the development of consumer culture through such topics as advertising and mass media, the body and sexuality, consumerist politics in the labor movement, and the response to the Americanization of consumption abroad.
  • HIST 226: U.S. Consumer Culture
    This course explores the development of consumer culture through such topics as advertising and mass media, the body and sexuality, consumerist politics in the labor movement, and the response to the Americanization of consumption abroad.
  • Economics of the Public Sector
    This course provides a theoretical and empirical examination of the government's role in the U.S. economy. Emphasis is placed on policy analysis using the criteria of efficiency and equity.
  • IDSC 203: Talking about Diversity
    This course prepares students to facilitate conversations in the Critical Conversations Program. Students learn about categories and theories related to social identity, power, and inequality.

Winter 2016

  • AMST 247 We've Never Not Been Here: Indigenous Peoples and Places
    This interdisciplinary course offers an introduction to important topics in the field of Native American Studies
  • POSC 120 Democracy and Dictatorship
    An introduction to the array of different democratic and authoritarian political institutions in both developing and developed countries.

Fall 2015

  • SPAN 328: Contemporary Fiction and the Market
    In this course we will be studying the various meanings of what has been labeled, esthetically and sociologically, as the Post-Modernist age, or Late Modernity.

Spring 2015

  • Hist 226: U.S. Consumer Culture
    In the period after 1880, the growth of a mass consumer society recast issues of identity, gender, race, class, family, and political life.
  • POSC 120.01: Comparative Political Regimes
    An introduction to the fundamentals of government and the variety of ways politics is practiced in different countries.
  • PHIL 243: Animal Ethics: The Moral Status of Animals
    This raises a pressing ethical question: what are our moral obligations (if any) to nonhuman animals, and how might we practically fulfill such moral obligations (if they exist)?

Winter 2015

  • IDSC 103: Student Conversations about Diversity and Community
    In this course students participate in peer-led conversations about diversity and community at Carleton.
  • POSC 120: Comparative Political Regimes
    An introduction to the fundamentals of government and the variety of ways politics is practiced in different countries. Capitalist democracies, transitional states and developing nations are compared.
  • BIOL 101: Human Reproduction and Sexuality
    The myths surrounding human reproduction and sexuality may out weigh our collective knowledge and understanding. This course will review the basic biology of all aspects of reproduction--from genes to behavior.

Fall 2014

  • IDSC 203: Talking about Diversity
    This four credit s/cr/nc only course prepares students to facilitate peer-led conversations about diversity.
  • ECON 270: Economics of the Public Sector
    Economics of the public sector takes a close look at the role of government (at all levels – federal, state, and local) in modern society.
  • SPAN 328: Contemporary Fiction and the Market
    In this course we will be studying the various meanings of what has been labeled, esthetically and sociologically, as the Post-Modernist age, or Late Modernity.

Spring 2014

  • AMST 252: Food Culture in the United States
    Explores the creation, exchange, and consumption of food in America, and the spaces in which it is produced, sold, shared, and eaten, focusing especially on food as a cultural artifact that is intricately tied to individual and group identification.
  • POSC 236: Global, National, and Human Security
    What are the greatest threats to national and global security? Students in this class researched issues of security at various levels and conducted interviews with professionals in the field, many located in Washington DC.

Winter 2014

  • SOAN 333: Environmental Anthropology
    Students in this course have the opportunity to develop an annotated bibliography on a topic that is related to work being done by environmentalist organizations in the region.
  • SOAN 330: Environmental Anthropology
    Students in this course have the opportunity to develop an annotated bibliography on a topic that is related to work being done by environmentalist organizations in the region.
  • PHIL 222: Topics in Medical Ethics
    Over the past forty years, the idea that competent patients have the right to make decisions about their own care has become paramount in medical ethics and medical practice.
  • PHIL 222: Topics in Medical Ethics
    Over the past 40 years, the idea that competent patients have the right to make decisions about their own care has become paramount in medical ethics and medical practice. We will explore these issues through philosophical readings and case studies.

Fall 2013

  • POSC 358: Comparative Social Movements
    This course will examine the role that social movements play in political life. Potential case studies include the transnational environmental movement, religious movements in Latin America and the growth of far right activism in northern Europe.
  • SPAN 328: Contemporary Fiction and the Market
    In this class students will critically explore environmental cycles at Carleton in connection with learning about art and alternative visions from Spain and Europe. They will also learn from documentary filmmakers from Spain.

Winter 2013

  • HIST 139: Foundations of Modern Europe
    The course examines the Renaissance, Reformation, Contact with the Americas, the Scientific Revolution and Enlightenment.