Recent Grants

  • Helen WongHelen Wong, Assistant Professor of Mathematics, has been awarded a $160,048 grant from the National Science Foundation for her project “RUI: Skeins on Surfaces.” Her project explores the extent to which the Kauffman skein algebra of a surface can serve as intermediary between quantum topology and hyperbolic geometry, and seeks to characterize knots and other topologically complex structures that can occur in DNA and proteins. As many as ten undergraduate researchers will participate in the research. Learn more about Wong’s research.

  • Matt Whited, Matt WhitedAssistant Professor of Chemistry, has received an Undergraduate Research grant from the American Chemical Society Petroleum Research Fund. His project, “Stoichiometric and Catalytic Nitrene-Group-Transfer Reactions from Late-Metal Silylamides,” will explore versatile metal-catalyzed routes to forming carbon–nitrogen bonds that are ubiquitous in pharmaceuticals and commodity chemicals. The grant will support the PI and seven Carleton students in performing this cutting-edge research. Read more about the Whited lab here.

  • Matt Rand, Matt RandProfessor of Biology, and Stephan Zweifel, Chair and Professor of Biology, with support from the Minnesota Herpetological Society, are participating in the project “Assessing genetic diversity within and among three populations of Bullsnakes in Minnesota.” Stephan ZweifelWorking with students in the Molecular Biology course and with Department of Natural Resources personnel, Rand and Zweifel will analyze the DNA profile of bullsnakes, a “species of special concern” in Minnesota.

  • Nelson Christensen,Nelson Christensen George H. and Marjorie F. Dixon Professor of Physics, is the recipient of a $210,000 grant from the National Science Foundation to do Laser Interferometric Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) astronomy research. His three-year project “RUI: Parameter Estimation, Data Analysis, and Detector Characterization for LIGO” continues the international collaborative analyses of data in search of gravitational wave signals, including signals from massive black hole systems and supernova produced signals. As many as six undergraduate researchers will apply novel statistical strategies to parameter estimation and data analysis, and identify detector disturbances for Advanced LIGO. See more of Nelson’s work at his web page.

  • Asuka Sango, Asuka SangoAssociate Professor of Religion, has been awarded a Summer Stipend from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) for her project “Buddhist Debate in Medieval Japan.” During the summer of 2015, at archives in Japan, she will continue research for her book on the role played by Buddhist debate in shaping the intellectual, religious, and cultural contours of Japan from the 11th to 16th centuries.

  • Serena Zabin, Serena ZabinAssociate Professor of History, has been awarded an American Council of Learned Societies (ACLS) Fellowship in addition to a National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) fellowship to finish her book on the Boston Massacre, Occupying Boston: An Intimate History of the Boston Massacre. Professor Zabin's book uncovers the extensive personal interactions between troops and their families and townspeople, and challenges the political spin put on the "massacre" that created its iconic place on the road to the American Revolution. Notably, Professor Zabin's awards come in funding cycles when the NEH funded only 7.5% and the ACLS funded less than 7% of the fellowship proposals received.

  • Alex Knodell, Alex KnodellAssistant Professor of Classical Languages, has been awarded a fellowship from the Harvard University Loeb Classical Library Foundation to conduct a second field season of the Mazi Archaeological Project, which he co-directs with colleagues from the Swiss School of Archeology in Greece and the 3rd Ephorate of Prehistoric and Classical Antiquities of the Greek Ministry of Culture. The team of 25 researchers, cultural heritage professionals, and students (some from Carleton) will employ a variety of methods, including intensive pedestrian survey, innovative digital recording, and geospatial and geophysical analysis to investigate and document surface and subsurface remains on a regional scale across the landscape of the Mazi Plain, located in Northwest Attica, Greece.

  • Barbara AllenBarbara AllenAda M. Harrison Distinguished Teaching Professor of the Social Sciences, received $15,000 from the CHS Foundation for her documentary film, “Actual World, Possible Future-A Documentary about the Lives and Work of Elinor and Vincent Ostrom.” This CHS 2015 Cooperative Education Grant will support Barbara’s March 2015 research trip to South Korea, on which she will interview and film important figures in the Korean cooperative movement and conduct research at coops and other social enterprises, including fisheries and fish markets, eco-tourism, and water resources. This opportunity is especially important to the documentary and to the cause of the coop movement because the movement in South Korea has both wrought enormous positive social change and provided a successful contrast to the North Korean model of state control.

  • Deborah Gross,Deborah Gross Professor of Chemistry, has received funding from the U.S. Department of Energy Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program through a subaward from the MSP Corporation. The project, led by Dr. Amir Naqwi at MSP, brings together a team of leading aerosol experts to develop a cutting-edge technology for investigating the chemistry of airborne particles, which is critical for the understanding of climate change. The resulting instrument will also be an advanced tool for monitoring and controlling air pollution.

  • Liz Raleigh, Liz RaleighAssistant Professor of Sociology, has been selected for a 2015 Career Enhancement Fellowship for Junior Faculty, a grant funded by the Mellon Foundation and administered by the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation. The fellowship provides Professor Raleigh with sabbatical support during 2015-2016 and a stipend for research, travel, or publication expenses. With the fellowship, Professor Raleigh will complete work on her book, Chosen Children: Race and the Adoption Marketplace, which argues that private transracial adoption serves as a lens into changing racial boundaries and conceptions of kinship in the modern United States.

  • Laurel Bradley,Laurel Bradley Senior Lecturer in Art and Art History and Director and Curator in the Perlman Teaching Museum, has been selected for a Fulbright award to Ireland. Her teaching and research appointment during academic year 2015-2016 will enable her to contribute to the Irish Museum of Modern Art (IMMA) curatorial and collections programs and develop lectures and courses related to contemporary art.

  • Adrienne Falcón,Adrienne Falcon Lecturer in Sociology and Director of Academic Civic Engagement, has been selected for a Fulbright U.S. Scholar award during four months of academic year 2015-2016. This appointment enables Lecturer Falcón to participate in and research the construction of academic community and civic engagement in Ecuador while teaching and doing research at the Universidad de Cuenca. In particular, Falcón will study the implementation of a new law mandating community involvement for all institutions of higher education in Ecuador - a subject which Falcón will introduce to the wider scholarly conversation about civic engagement.