Recent Grants

  • Knodell awarded fellowship

    January 25, 2017

    Alex Knodell, Alex KnodellAssistant Professor of Classics and Co-Director of Archaeology, has been awarded a National Endowment for the Humanities​ ​Fellowship ​through the American School of Classical Studies at Athens for his collaborative project, “Crossroads and Boundaries in an Ancient Greek Borderland: The Mazi Archaeological Project.” Professor Knodell will use the fellowship​ to work with collaborators in Athens​ toward the final publication of a multi-disciplinary field project on the Mazi Plain​​, a landscape that has been both a crossroads and a boundary since ancient times. This project offers a long-term approach to regional history, human-environmental interaction, and cultural heritage management​.​ ​Final publication will include a ​multi-authored ​scholarly monograph​, an interactive online database, and a Greek-language guidebook geared toward a popular audience and designed to promote local engagement with the region.

  • Trish Ferrett, Trish FerrettProfessor of Chemistry, Stephen Mohring, Professor of Art, Nancy Braker, Lecturer in Biology and Puzak Family Director of the Cowling Arboretum will participate in the ACM Seminars in Advanced Interdisciplinary Learning (SAIL), gathering with 12 other colleagues from six ACM colleges during June 2017 at Coe College’s Wilderness Field Station (WFS).  Stephen Mohring

    This 2017 Seminar, Wilderness in the Anthropocene, includes overlapping interdisciplinary, team-taught modules – in boreal ecology, environmental writing, and environmental social science – touching on the biology of wilderness, its place in our art and mind, and its place in our current society. Faculty will approach complex topics from different disciplinary perspectives, combining both specialist and non‐specialist roles. Following the on-site portion of the seminar, each participant will create a new course or course module on a topic related to the seminar that advances his or her teaching interests.Nancy Braker

    The ACM’s SAIL program, funded by a generous grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, supports faculty as they develop innovative, multi-disciplinary curricula for upper-level students.

  • MSAB grant to Gao Hong

    November 2, 2016

    Gao Hong,Gao Hong Director of the Carleton Chinese Music Ensemble and Senior Lecturer in Chinese Musical Instruments, has won a 2017 Arts Tour Minnesota grant from the Minnesota State Arts Board. She will conduct performances and outreach activities featuring storytelling music from the Chinese pipa repertoire in small, rural community libraries throughout greater Minnesota.

  • Peter Balaam, Associate Professor of English, was chosen to participate in the Associated Colleges of the Midwest's Faculty Site Visit to the off-campus study program in Pune, India, in October 2016. This professional development opportunity familiarizes faculty at ACM colleges with consortial off-campus study programs.

  • T​he Science Education Resource CenterSERC mini banner (SERC) at Carleton was awarded a $300,000 grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) for a two-year project to develop bold, new models to broaden participation in STEM. SERC is one of 37 projects being recognized for first-ever awards for the NSF INCLUDES (Inclusion across the Nation of Communities of Learners of Underrepresented Discoverers in Engineering and Science) program which aims to improve access to STEM education and career pathways at the national scale, making them more widely inclusive to under served populations. The geosciences lag behind most other STEM disciplines in diversity and are also projected to have a deficit in the workforce in the coming years.

    SERC's initiative, Engaging Local Communities in Geoscience Pathways, brings together partners who have led successful national efforts addressing components of these challenges with partners in three regions to create pathways in three regional pilots, focusing on key academic transitions in three diverse U.S. communities—Atlanta, GA; San Bernardino, CA; and Oklahoma—and will use these pathways as laboratories and catalysts for a systemic change in geoscience and geoscience education. Of the initial 37 recipients, Carleton is the only private, four-year liberal arts institution represented. For more information on the 37 projects visit the NSF website.

  • Andrea Mazzariello, Andrea MazzarielloVisiting Assistant Professor of Music, has been awarded a $5,000 “Established Artist” grant from The Southeastern Minnesota Arts Council for his new musical project, “Plant Another Flower.” With the SEMAC grant, Andrea will develop a new piece of music and words to perform himself, centered on drums, keyboards, voice, and electronics played simultaneously. He will premiere this “one-person band” work - which merges his experience playing rock music with his experience writing concert music - at the Northfield Arts Guild in March 2017.

  • Christopher Calderone, Christopher CalderoneAssistant Professor of Chemistry, has been awarded a National Science Foundation grant for his project “RUI: Condensation Domain-Catalyzed Dehydration.” His research identifies new pathways by which bacteria and fungi produce molecules known as non-ribosomal peptides, examples of which include such therapeutically important medicines as cyclosporin and penicillin. This project involves four student researchers each year, the development of educational modules for undergraduate teaching labs at Carleton, and the development of curriculum for the public-private LearningWorks partnership program in downtown Minneapolis to teach underserved middle-school students molecular biology concepts and techniques.

  • Matt WhitedMatthew Whited, Assistant Professor of Chemistry, has been named a Henry Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar by the Camille & Henry Dreyfus Foundation, a major funder of chemistry research and teaching activity. The Henry Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Awards Program supports the research and teaching careers of talented young faculty in the chemical sciences at undergraduate institutions. The award is based on accomplishment in scholarly research with undergraduates, as well as a compelling commitment to teaching, and provides an unrestricted research grant of $60,000.

    Professor Whited’s research program focuses on chemical synthesis involving transition metals, with a particular interest in carbon dioxide transformation for renewable fuels, and has involved 18 Carleton students since 2011. The grant will fund equipment purchases to support cutting-edge research with Carleton undergraduates as well as conference travel for Professor Whited and his students. The award also provides funds for supporting departmental expenses associated with research and education, and these have been designated for developing course-based research opportunities in the Chemistry Department.

  • Allison Kettering, Alison KetteringWilliam R. Kenan Professor of Art History Emerita, garnered support from The Gladys Krieble Delmas Foundation to modernize the Journal of Historians of Netherlandish Art, of which she is Editor-in-Chief. The grant will enable the Journal to work over 2017 to upgrade its digital architecture to support recent innovations in online publishing and to train key staff to effectively use new digital resources, allowing the Journal to publish at least one digitally-enhanced article in each issue.

  • Michael Flynn, Michael FlynnWilliam H. Laird Professor of Linguistics and the Liberal Arts and Chair of Linguistics, and Jeff Ondich, Professor of Mathematics and Computer Science, have been awarded a grant from the National Science Foundation's Documenting Endangered Languages program for a project entitled “Fostering Dakota Language Restoration through Workshops: First Steps to Partnering by the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate, the Dakotah Language Institute, and Carleton College.” Jeff Ondich

    Through this project, Flynn, Ondich, Associate Professor Catherine Fortin, and Assistant Professor Cherlon Ussery will work in close partnership with a team of Dakota educators to advance the formal description of the endangered Dakota language, and begin planning to produce comprehensive courses and accessible electronic resources about Dakota language and culture.

    The project's centerpieces are a workshop, to be held at Carleton in late summer 2016, at which Carleton faculty and students will collaboratively work with Sisseton-Wahpeton educators and Dakota speakers on the Dakota language, and a follow up visit by Carleton faculty and students to the Oyate in eastern South Dakota in the fall.

  • Laura Chihara, Laura ChiharaProfessor of Mathematics and Statistics, received a Faculty Career Enhancement grant (FaCE) from the Associated Colleges of the Midwest (ACM) for the project "Making Decisions with Data: Planning for collaborative courses in data science." She will work with colleagues from Grinnell College and Lawrence University to develop a suite of assignments and projects that will hone student’s abilities to work with messy “real world” data and problems. 

  • Rob Thompson, Rob ThompsonAssistant Professor of Mathematics, has been accepted as a mentor for the program “Preparation for Industrial Careers in Mathematical Sciences” (PIC Math). As part of this program, Rob will advise a group of Carleton students as they tackle industrial mathematics research problems proposed by business, industrial, and government partners. Students will present problem solutions directly to company liaisons and publicly at the national “Mathfest” conference in Summer 2017. PIC Math is a program administered by the Mathematical Association of America and Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics, with support from the National Science Foundation (DMS-1345499).