Events

Each term African and African American Studies sponsors the Angelina Weld Grimké lecture series and at least one additional event or lecture.


Angelina Weld Grimké.jpg

Angelina Weld Grimké (February 27, 1880 – June 10, 1958) was the first African American female student to attend the Carleton Academy, a preparatory school that was a part of the college campus from 1866 to 1906.  She went on to be an American journalist, teacher, playwright and poet who came to prominence during the Harlem Renaissance; she was one of the first African-American women to have a play publicly performed.  A list of previous Grimke Lectures can be found here.


 

Oct 26

Film showing: "Oberlin-Inanda: The Life and Times of John L. Dube"

Cherif Keita's film "Oberlin-Inanda: The Life and Times of John L. Dube" (2005, 54mn, Special Mention at the 2005 Pan African Film Festival of Ouagadougou) will be screened as part of the Carleton International Education Week in Leighton 305, 7:00-8:30 pm (with discussion) (Tuesday, October 26, 2010)

Tuesday, October 26th, 2010
7:00 – 9:00 pm / Leighton 305

Cherif Keita's film "Oberlin-Inanda: The Life and Times of John L. Dube" (2005, 54mn,Special Mention at the 2005 Pan African Film Festival of Ouagadougou) will be screened as part of the Carleton International Education Week in Leighton 305, 7-8.30 pm (with discussion), Tuesday, October 26, 2010.
Film synopsis:
Shot in Oberlin (Ohio, US) and Inanda (KwaZulu-Natal province of South Africa), this 55-minute documentary film features the life and work of John Langalibalele Dube(1871-1946), pioneer educator, journalist, musician, churchman and politician, who co-founded the African National Congress in 1912(before Nelson Mandela was born) and served as its first president until 1917. "Oberlin-Inanda" connects Dube's education in 19th century United States with his struggle for political and economic independence and celebrates his enduring legacy in today's democratic South Africa. This film is a tribute to the township of Inanda, the place which nurtured not only John Dube but also Mahatma Gandhi and his Satyagraha movement in the early 1900s and many other movements for social justice in South Africa. Professor Thandabantu Nhlapo, Deputy Vice Chancellor of the University of Cape Town said: "this film's message is relevant to contemporary South African society, both young and old, and at many levels: educational, historical, social and political."

Sponsored by African/Afr American Studies. Contact: Nikki Lamberty, x4217