Courses

Fall 2017

  • ECON 110: Principles of Macroeconomics

    This course gives students a foundation in the general principles of economics as a basis for effective citizenship and, when combined with 111, as a preparation for all advanced study in economics. Topics include analysis of the measurement, level, and distribution of national income; the concepts of inflation and depression; the role and structure of the banking system; fiscal and monetary stabilization techniques; implications of and limits to economic growth; and international economic relations. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter; offered Fall 2017, Winter 2018, Spring 2018 · Ethan L Struby, Yaniv Ben-Ami, Nathan D Grawe, Bruce R Dalgaard
  • ECON 111: Principles of Microeconomics

    This course gives the students a foundation in the general principles of economics as a basis for effective citizenship and, when combined with 110, as a preparation for all advanced study in economics. Topics include consumer choice theory; the formation of prices under competition, monopoly, and other market structures; the determination of wages, profits, and income from capital; the distribution of income; and an analysis of policy directed towards problems of public finance, pollution, natural resources, and public goods. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter; offered Fall 2017, Winter 2018, Spring 2018 · Prathi Seneviratne, Shane Auerbach, Aaron M Swoboda, Jonathan M Lafky
  • ECON 240: Microeconomics of Development

    This course explores household behavior in developing countries. We will cover areas including fertility decisions, health and mortality, investment in education, the intra-household allocation of resources, household structure, and the marriage market. We will also look at the characteristics of land, labor, and credit markets, particularly technology adoption; land tenure and tenancy arrangements; the role of agrarian institutions in the development process; and the impacts of alternative politics and strategies in developing countries. The course complements Economics 241. Prerequisites: Economics 110 and 111 6 credit; Social Inquiry, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter, International Studies; offered Fall 2017 · Faress Bhuiyan
  • ECON 273: Water and Western Economic Development

    This course examines a number of important aspects of water as a legal/political/economic factor in the development of the western United States. The topics include western water law, the evolution of water supply institutions, state and local water planning, the role of the federal government, and a number of current water problems, including surface and groundwater pollution, impediments to market transfers of water, and state/regional/international conflicts over water. Prerequisites: Economics 110 and 111 6 credit; Social Inquiry, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter; offered Fall 2017 · Mark T Kanazawa
  • ECON 274: Labor Economics

    Why do some people choose to work and others do not? Why are some people paid higher wages than others? What are the economic benefits of education for the individual and for society? How do government policies, such as subsidized child care, the Earned Income Tax Credit and the income tax influence whether people work and the number of hours they choose to work? These are some of the questions examined in labor economics. This course will focus on the labor supply and human capital decisions of individuals and households. Prerequisites: Economics 110 and 111 6 credit; Social Inquiry, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter; offered Fall 2017 · Faress Bhuiyan
  • ECON 281: International Finance

    This course studies theories of the multi-faceted interaction between the balance of international payments and foreign exchange market and the general levels of domestic prices, employment and economic activity. Topics include the balance of payments, foreign exchange markets, adjustment mechanisms in international payments, macroeconomic policies for internal and external balance, and international monetary systems. Prerequisites: Economics 110 and 111 6 credit; Social Inquiry, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter; offered Fall 2017 · Prathi Seneviratne
  • ECON 329: Econometrics

    This course is an introduction to the statistical methods used by economists to test hypotheses and to study and quantify economic relationships. The course emphasizes both statistical theory and practical application through analysis of economic data sets using statistical software. Topics include two-variable and multiple regression, interval estimation and hypothesis testing, discrete and continuous structural change, parameter restrictions, model construction, heteroscedasticity, autocorrelation, and multicollinearity. Prerequisites: Mathematics 111 and either Mathematics 215 or 275, and Economics 110 and 111 6 credit; Social Inquiry, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter; offered Fall 2017, Spring 2018 · Mark T Kanazawa, Aaron M Swoboda
  • ECON 330: Intermediate Price Theory

    An analysis of the forces determining relative prices within the framework of production and distribution. This class is normally taken by juniors. Sophomores considering enrolling should speak to the instructor. Prerequisites: Economics 110 and 111 and Mathematics 111 6 credit; Social Inquiry, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter; offered Fall 2017, Winter 2018 · Jenny Bourne
  • ECON 395: Advanced Seminar in Experimental Economics

    Experimental economics focuses on using controlled experiments to demonstrate causal relationships in economic decision making. We will develop a deep understanding of both the methodology and major findings of experimental economics. Many discussions will be student-led, through in-depth presentation of journal articles. Topics covered will be determined largely by student interest, but might include subjects such as altruistic behavior, bargaining, market behavior, risk preferences, public goods, and auctions.

    Prerequisites: Economics 329, 330 and 331 or instructor permission 6 credit; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement, Writing Requirement, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter; offered Fall 2017 · Jonathan M Lafky
  • ECON 395: Advanced Seminar in Macroeconomic Theory

    This course includes detailed analyses of aggregate consumption, investment, money-holding and labor market behavior with special attention to each area's micro-foundations and to the empirical verification of theory. These analyses are related to the determination of national income, employment and the price level; to economic growth and business fluctuations; and to optimal public policy.

    Prerequisites: Economics 329, 330 and 331 or instructor permission 6 credit; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement, Writing Requirement, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter; offered Fall 2017 · Nathan D Grawe
  • ECON 400: Integrative Exercise

    3 credit; S/NC; offered Fall 2017, Winter 2018, Spring 2018 · Jenny Bourne, Nathan D Grawe, Jonathan M Lafky

Winter 2018

  • ECON 110: Principles of Macroeconomics

    This course gives students a foundation in the general principles of economics as a basis for effective citizenship and, when combined with 111, as a preparation for all advanced study in economics. Topics include analysis of the measurement, level, and distribution of national income; the concepts of inflation and depression; the role and structure of the banking system; fiscal and monetary stabilization techniques; implications of and limits to economic growth; and international economic relations. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter; offered Fall 2017, Winter 2018, Spring 2018 · Ethan L Struby, Yaniv Ben-Ami, Nathan D Grawe, Bruce R Dalgaard
  • ECON 111: Principles of Microeconomics

    This course gives the students a foundation in the general principles of economics as a basis for effective citizenship and, when combined with 110, as a preparation for all advanced study in economics. Topics include consumer choice theory; the formation of prices under competition, monopoly, and other market structures; the determination of wages, profits, and income from capital; the distribution of income; and an analysis of policy directed towards problems of public finance, pollution, natural resources, and public goods. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter; offered Fall 2017, Winter 2018, Spring 2018 · Prathi Seneviratne, Shane Auerbach, Aaron M Swoboda, Jonathan M Lafky
  • ECON 244: Analysis of Microeconomic Development Models

    This course is the second part of a two-term winter break course sequence beginning with Economics 240. This course will focus on critically analyzing the appropriateness of modern microeconomic development models in the context of Bangladesh. Students exposed to various on-site visits and lectures in Bangladesh during the winter break will be required to research, write and present their views on the reliability of different model assumptions and implications they studied in Economics 240.

    Prerequisites: Economics 110 and 111 and 240 6 credit; Social Inquiry, Writing Requirement, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter, International Studies; offered Winter 2018 · Faress Bhuiyan
  • ECON 259: Economics of Higher Education

    This course examines current issues in higher education through the lens of both theoretical and empirical economics. Students will be exposed to both signaling models of higher education and empirical analyses of its returns. We will also discuss admissions as a matching process, rising tuition as a form of price discrimination, and the globalization of higher education, among other topics.

    Prerequisites: Economics 110 and 111 6 credit; Social Inquiry, Writing Requirement; offered Winter 2018 · Shane Auerbach
  • ECON 264: Health Care Economics

    This course will focus on the economics of medical care and how health care markets and systems work. We will consider both private health insurance markets and publicly provided social health insurance. The changes which demography, technology and the Affordable Health Care Act are bringing to health care delivery will be examined. Some time will be devoted to understanding the health care systems in other countries. This is a discussion course. Prerequisites: Economics 110 and 111. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter; offered Winter 2018 · Nathan D Grawe
  • ECON 271: Economics of Natural Resources and the Environment

    This course focuses on environmental economics, energy economics, and the relationship between them. Economic incentives for pollution abatement, the industrial organization of energy production, optimal depletion rates of energy sources, and the environmental and economic consequences of alternate energy sources are analyzed. Prerequisites: Economics 111 6 credit; Social Inquiry, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter; offered Winter 2018 · Aaron M Swoboda
  • ECON 280: International Trade

    A study of international trade theories and their policy implications. Classical and neo-classical trade models, the gains from trade, the terms of trade and the distribution of income, world trade patterns, international factor movements, tariffs, and the impact of commercial policy on developing and developed countries are analyzed. Prerequisites: Economics 110 and 111 6 credit; Social Inquiry, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter; offered Winter 2018 · Prathi Seneviratne
  • ECON 330: Intermediate Price Theory

    An analysis of the forces determining relative prices within the framework of production and distribution. This class is normally taken by juniors. Sophomores considering enrolling should speak to the instructor. Prerequisites: Economics 110 and 111 and Mathematics 111 6 credit; Social Inquiry, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter; offered Fall 2017, Winter 2018 · Jenny Bourne
  • ECON 331: Intermediate Macro Theory

    Analysis of the forces determining the general level of output, employment, and prices with special emphasis on the role of money and on interest rate determination. This class is normally taken by juniors. Sophomores considering enrolling should speak to the instructor. Prerequisites: Mathematics 111 and Mathematics 215 (or Mathematics 275 or permission of the instructor) and Economics 110 and 111 6 credit; Social Inquiry, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter; offered Winter 2018, Spring 2018 · Yaniv Ben-Ami
  • ECON 395: Advanced Seminar in Labor Economics

    Labor economics is the study of work and pay. It encompasses a wide variety of topics, including the nature of the labor contract, human capital investment, fringe benefits, search and hiring, turnover, working conditions, discrimination, union activities, income and wealth distribution, and government policies. The seminar considers labor market activities within the larger context of general household decision-making about family formation, the timing of marriage and childbirth, and the allocation of unpaid household work among family members.

    Prerequisites: Economics 329, 330 and 331 or instructor permission 6 credit; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement, Writing Requirement, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter; offered Winter 2018 · Jenny Bourne
  • ECON 398: Advanced Research in Economics

    This course is designed to support majors in developing advanced skills in economic research and communication. Through a combination of class discussion, small group work, and/or one-on-one interactions with the professor, majors learn the process of constructing strong, theoretically-grounded arguments through primary research, secondary research, or both. Students will also learn and practice strategies for engaging critically with contemporary scholarship and effective techniques of peer review and the oral presentation of research.

    Prerequisites: Economics 395 and concurrent registration in Economics 400. Instructor permission required 6 credit; S/CR/NC; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; offered Winter 2018, Spring 2018 · Jenny Bourne, Nathan D Grawe, Jonathan M Lafky
  • ECON 400: Integrative Exercise

    3 credit; S/NC; offered Fall 2017, Winter 2018, Spring 2018 · Jenny Bourne, Nathan D Grawe, Jonathan M Lafky

Spring 2018

  • ECON 110: Principles of Macroeconomics

    This course gives students a foundation in the general principles of economics as a basis for effective citizenship and, when combined with 111, as a preparation for all advanced study in economics. Topics include analysis of the measurement, level, and distribution of national income; the concepts of inflation and depression; the role and structure of the banking system; fiscal and monetary stabilization techniques; implications of and limits to economic growth; and international economic relations. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter; offered Fall 2017, Winter 2018, Spring 2018 · Ethan L Struby, Yaniv Ben-Ami, Nathan D Grawe, Bruce R Dalgaard
  • ECON 111: Principles of Microeconomics

    This course gives the students a foundation in the general principles of economics as a basis for effective citizenship and, when combined with 110, as a preparation for all advanced study in economics. Topics include consumer choice theory; the formation of prices under competition, monopoly, and other market structures; the determination of wages, profits, and income from capital; the distribution of income; and an analysis of policy directed towards problems of public finance, pollution, natural resources, and public goods. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter; offered Fall 2017, Winter 2018, Spring 2018 · Prathi Seneviratne, Shane Auerbach, Aaron M Swoboda, Jonathan M Lafky
  • ECON 241: Growth and Development

    Why are some countries rich and others poor? What causes countries to grow? This course develops a general framework of economic growth and development to analyze these questions. We will document the empirical differences in growth and development across countries and study some of the theories developed to explain these differences. This course complements Economics 240. Prerequisites: Economics 110 and 111 6 credit; Social Inquiry; offered Spring 2018 · Ethan L Struby
  • ECON 257: Economics of Gender

    This course uses economic theory and empirical evidence to examine gender differentials in education, marriage, fertility, earnings, labor market participation, occupational choice, and household work. Trends and patterns in gender-based outcomes will be examined across time, across countries, and within socio-economic groups, using empirical evidence from both historical and recent research. The impact of government and firm policies on gender outcomes will also be examined. By the end of the course, students will be able to utilize the most common economic tools in the study of gender inequality, as well as understand their strengths and weaknesses.

    Prerequisites: Economics 110 and 111 6 credit; Social Inquiry, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter; offered Spring 2018 · Prathi Seneviratne
  • ECON 263: Entrepreneurship, Innovation, and Economic Performance

    Joseph Schumpeter, in lamenting the absence of an accepted theory of entrepreneurship, observed that this gap in economics is much like having Hamlet performed with the Prince of Denmark absent. Much has changed since Schumpeter leveled this criticism. Economics has embraced the contributions of entrepreneurs and provided theoretical models explaining their actions. This course explores the foundations of a microeconomic theory of entrepreneurship, investigating the role of entrepreneurs (and intrapreneurs within large organizations) as agents for change. Case studies of business development provide practical illustrations of ways in which entrepreneurs operate and how their efforts contribute to economic progress. Prerequisites: Economics 111 6 credit; Social Inquiry; offered Spring 2018 · Bruce R Dalgaard
  • ECON 267: Behavioral Economics

    This course introduces experimental economics and behavioral economics as two complementary approaches to understanding economic decision making. We will study the use of controlled experiments to test and critique economic theories, as well as how these theories can be improved by introducing psychologically plausible assumptions to our models. We will read a broad survey of experimental and behavioral results, including risk and time preferences, prospect theory, other-regarding preferences, the design of laboratory and field experiments, and biases in decision making.

    Prerequisites: Economics 110 and 111 6 credit; Social Inquiry, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter; offered Spring 2018 · Jonathan M Lafky
  • ECON 269: Economics of Climate Change

    This course studies economic models of climate change and their implications for policy design. Covered topics include: the relationship between climate change and the macroeconomy, the performance of different climate policy instruments such as carbon taxes and cap and trade systems, the potential effects of innovation, and the economics surrounding the use of different types of energy. Prerequisites: Economics 110 and 111 6 credit; Social Inquiry, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter; offered Spring 2018 · Aaron M Swoboda
  • ECON 278: Industrial Organization and Firm Behavior

    This course analyzes the firm's marketing and pricing problems, its conduct, and the resulting economic performance, given the nature of the demand for its products, its buying markets, the nature of its unit costs, and the structure of its selling markets. Prerequisites: Economics 110 and 111 6 credit; Social Inquiry, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter; offered Spring 2018 · Nathan D Grawe
  • ECON 329: Econometrics

    This course is an introduction to the statistical methods used by economists to test hypotheses and to study and quantify economic relationships. The course emphasizes both statistical theory and practical application through analysis of economic data sets using statistical software. Topics include two-variable and multiple regression, interval estimation and hypothesis testing, discrete and continuous structural change, parameter restrictions, model construction, heteroscedasticity, autocorrelation, and multicollinearity. Prerequisites: Mathematics 111 and either Mathematics 215 or 275, and Economics 110 and 111 6 credit; Social Inquiry, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter; offered Fall 2017, Spring 2018 · Mark T Kanazawa, Aaron M Swoboda
  • ECON 331: Intermediate Macro Theory

    Analysis of the forces determining the general level of output, employment, and prices with special emphasis on the role of money and on interest rate determination. This class is normally taken by juniors. Sophomores considering enrolling should speak to the instructor. Prerequisites: Mathematics 111 and Mathematics 215 (or Mathematics 275 or permission of the instructor) and Economics 110 and 111 6 credit; Social Inquiry, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter; offered Winter 2018, Spring 2018 · Yaniv Ben-Ami
  • ECON 398: Advanced Research in Economics

    This course is designed to support majors in developing advanced skills in economic research and communication. Through a combination of class discussion, small group work, and/or one-on-one interactions with the professor, majors learn the process of constructing strong, theoretically-grounded arguments through primary research, secondary research, or both. Students will also learn and practice strategies for engaging critically with contemporary scholarship and effective techniques of peer review and the oral presentation of research.

    Prerequisites: Economics 395 and concurrent registration in Economics 400. Instructor permission required 6 credit; S/CR/NC; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; offered Winter 2018, Spring 2018 · Jenny Bourne, Nathan D Grawe, Jonathan M Lafky
  • ECON 400: Integrative Exercise

    3 credit; S/NC; offered Fall 2017, Winter 2018, Spring 2018 · Jenny Bourne, Nathan D Grawe, Jonathan M Lafky