Courses (catalog)

Fall 2014

  • GERM 101: Elementary German

    This course stresses a firm understanding of the basic structural patterns of the German language through reading, writing, speaking, and listening drills. For students with no previous knowledge of German or for those whose test scores indicate that this is the appropriate level of placement. 6 credit; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; offered Fall 2014 · L. Butt, R. Paas
  • GERM 204: Intermediate German

    Critical reading and discussion of selected German plays, short stories and/or films. Prerequisites: German 103 or appropriate placement score. 6 credit; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; offered Fall 2014 · R. Paas, A. Ulmer
  • GERM 272: The Latest--Current Themes in German Literature, Film and the Media

    In this course, students will read and discuss a number of new works from the German-speaking countries that deal with important contemporary issues--the pressures of growing up and finding a job in uncertain economic times, the catastrophe of 9/11, the ever-present theme of finding love, immigrant perspectives, the challenges of aging, etc. We will examine novels and stories that deal with these topics, but also articles in magazines (Der Spiegel, Die Zeit, Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung) and films, trying to understand how various genres and media differ in their approaches to our themes. At the center of our discussion there will thus be the question what forms of expression a society finds for the formulation of its most urgent challenges, and how these texts take part in the public debate. Prerequisites: German 204 or equivalent (first-year students please talk to the instructor). 6 credit; Literary/Artistic Analysis, International Studies; offered Fall 2014 · S. Leonhard
  • GERM 400: Integrative Exercise

    Examining an aspect of German literature across eras or genres. 6 credit; S/NC; offered Fall 2014, Winter 2015 · Staff

Winter 2015

  • GERM 102: Elementary German

    Further study of the basic structural patterns of the German language. Prerequisites: German 101 or appropriate placement score. 6 credit; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; offered Winter 2015 · L. Butt, R. Paas
  • GERM 140: Culture or Barbarity? The German Question

    German culture has had a profound influence on world history, but one often wonders how the culture that produced Goethe, Schiller, Luther, Beethoven, and Kant was also the source of some of the greatest atrocities of the twentieth century. We will attempt to understand the reasons for this dichotomy by considering the development of Germany within the context of Europe from Roman times to the present. 6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry, International Studies; offered Winter 2015 · R. Paas
  • GERM 273: Mystery, Murder, Madness: Crime Stories in German Literature

    This course focuses on the rich German tradition of crime and detective stories, with a focus on the long nineteenth century. Contrasting authentic crime reports with fictionalized accounts of murder, rape, and mysterious occurrences, we will approach literary crime scenes as narrative spaces where contested concepts of truth, justice, and morality emerge, and where changing notions of perception come to the fore. Conducted in German. Prerequisites: German 204 or the equivalent. 3 credit; Literary/Artistic Analysis, International Studies; offered Winter 2015 · L. Butt
  • GERM 351: The Age of Goethe

    The literary movements of Enlightenment, Storm and Stress, and Classicism as seen through selected works of Goethe, Schiller, Lessing and Herder. Prerequisites: German 204 or the equivalent. 6 credit; Literary/Artistic Analysis; offered Winter 2015 · L. Butt
  • GERM 400: Integrative Exercise

    Examining an aspect of German literature across eras or genres. 6 credit; S/NC; offered Fall 2014, Winter 2015 · Staff

Spring 2015

  • GERM 103: Intermediate German

    Completion of the study of basic structural patterns of the German language, and the reading and discussion of a longer literary work. Prerequisites: German 102 or appropriate placement score. 6 credit; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; offered Spring 2015 · L. Butt
  • GERM 263: Alternative Visions: Counter Cinema from New German Cinema to the Berlin School

    "The old cinema is dead! We believe in a new cinema!" This bold declaration, signed by a group of German filmmakers at the Oberhausen Film Festival in 1962, marks a radical break with German postwar film. Influenced by the French New Wave and the 1968 student protests, the directors of New German Cinema created works that were both artistically ambitious and socially critical. We will discuss iconic films of this period by directors such as Fassbinder, Herzog, Schlöndorff, and Wenders, and contrast their vision with the politics and aesthetics of a later generation of German filmmakers, the Berlin School. Conducted in German. Prerequisites: German 204 or equivalent. 3 credit; Literary/Artistic Analysis, International Studies; offered Spring 2015 · L. Butt