Courses (catalog)

The sections for GERM 101, 102, and 103 are flexible for students to enroll in. If a student has a conflict between their MWF / TTH classes and a 5-day language class schedule, they can talk with Juliane Schicker (jschicker@carleton) to cross-enroll in 2 sections at the same time.

Fall 2017

  • GERM 101: Elementary German

    This course stresses a firm understanding of the basic structural patterns of the German language through reading, writing, speaking, and listening drills. For students with no previous knowledge of German or for those whose test scores indicate that this is the appropriate level of placement. 6 credit; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; offered Fall 2017 · Juliane Schicker, Josiah B Simon
  • GERM 105: Berlin Program: Beginning German in Berlin

    This course is designed for participants in Carleton's OCS Berlin program with little or no prior knowledge of German. Students will develop a basic foundation in the five skills of reading, writing, listening, speaking, and intercultural communication, with the goal of accomplishing a variety of basic everyday needs in Berlin. Topics will include communication with hosts, travel and transportation, shopping, and meals. Although students will be introduced to some fundamental grammar points, the emphasis is on the development of conversational abilities. 6 credit; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; offered Fall 2017 · Sigi Leonhard
  • GERM 175: Berlin Program: Berlin Field Studies in English

    Individually or in small groups, students will work on a major project that incorporates research done on-site in Berlin and during our travels. The main objective of the course is to interact with Berlin and Berliners (and Europe and Europeans). Possible topics include music, visual arts, immigration, media, politics, personal history topics, or Germany's role within Europe. Conducted in English. 6 credit; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement, International Studies; offered Fall 2017 · Sigi Leonhard, David G Tompkins
  • GERM 204: Intermediate German

    In this course, students build on basic communication skills to engage in more in-depth spoken and written discussions of German-speaking culture. By analyzing longer and more challenging texts, films and cultural media, continuing grammar review, and writing compositions, students acquire greater facility and confidence in all four language skills (writing, speaking, listening, and reading). Prerequisites: German 103 or equivalent 6 credit; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; offered Fall 2017 · Josiah B Simon
  • GERM 205: Berlin Program: Intermediate Composition and Conversation

    This course is designed for students with intermediate proficiency in German, who wish to extend their knowledge of German language and culture through reading, discussions, and writing. Students will work on developing the ability to articulate opinions, exchange substantive information and to argue points of view; honing analytic and interpretive writing skills; and expanding their linguistic toolkit. The class format features discussions with grammar exercises interspersed as needed. Prerequisites: German 103 or equivalent 6 credit; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; offered Fall 2017 · Sigi Leonhard
  • GERM 254: Berlin Program: The World's a Stage -- Theater in Berlin

    This course is structured around the theater productions of the fall season in Berlin. Our group will attend six to eight performances of German language plays, ranging from the Enlightenment to the post-war period. In preparation for each outing, students will read and discuss the original play, and study its historical and literary context. In the course of the term, we will hone our skills as theater spectators and learn how to describe and critique different performance styles and directorial choices.

    Prerequisites: German 103 or equivalent 6 credit; Literary/Artistic Analysis, International Studies, Writing Requirement; offered Fall 2017 · Sigi Leonhard
  • GERM 275: Berlin Program: Berlin Field Studies in German

    Individually or in small groups, students will work on a major project in German that incorporates research done on-site in Berlin and during our travels. The main objective of the course is to interact with Berlin and Berliners (and Europe and Europeans). Possible topics include music, visual arts, immigration, media, politics, personal history topics, or Germany's role within Europe. Prerequisites: German 103 or equivalent 6 credit; S/CR/NC; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement, International Studies; offered Fall 2017 · Sigi Leonhard, David G Tompkins
  • GERM 305: Berlin Program: Advanced Composition and Conversation

    This course is designed for students with advanced proficiency in German, who wish to extend their knowledge of German language and culture through reading, discussions, and writing. Students will work on developing the ability to articulate opinions, exchange substantive information and to argue points of view; honing analytic and interpretive writing skills; and expanding their linguistic toolkit. The class format features discussions with grammar exercises interspersed as needed.

    Prerequisites: German 204 or equivalent 6 credit; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; offered Fall 2017 · Sigi Leonhard
  • GERM 400: Integrative Exercise

    Examining an aspect of German literature across eras or genres. 6 credit; S/NC; offered Fall 2017, Winter 2018

Winter 2018

  • GERM 102: Elementary German

    Further study of the basic structural patterns of the German language. Prerequisites: German 101 or equivalent 6 credit; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; offered Winter 2018 · Juliane Schicker, Josiah B Simon
  • GERM 151: Soul Searching: Faust and the Devil in German Cultural History

    Would you sell your soul to the devil? In this course, we will explore the legend of Faust and portrayals of the devil from the Renaissance and Enlightenment to the present day, drawing on examples from classic and popular literature, film and music. Through the lens of the Faustian theme, students of all disciplines and majors are invited to survey key moments and figures in German-language culture and history. Taught in English.

    6 credit; Literary/Artistic Analysis, Writing Requirement, International Studies; offered Winter 2018 · Josiah B Simon
  • GERM 216: German Short Prose

    The course introduces students to the joys and challenges of reading short German fictional and non-fictional texts of various genres from three centuries, including fairy tales, aphorisms, short stories, novellas, tweets, essays, and newspaper articles. We will read slowly and with an eye to grammar and vocabulary building, while also concentrating on developing an understanding of German cultural history. Texts and class discussions will be in German.

    Prerequisites: German 204 or equivalent 6 credit; Literary/Artistic Analysis, International Studies; offered Winter 2018 · Juliane Schicker
  • GERM 400: Integrative Exercise

    Examining an aspect of German literature across eras or genres. 6 credit; S/NC; offered Fall 2017, Winter 2018

Spring 2018

  • GERM 103: Intermediate German

    Continuation of the study of basic structural patterns of the German language, and the reading and discussion of longer texts, films, and other media from German-speaking cultures.

    Prerequisites: German 102 or equivalent 6 credit; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; offered Spring 2018 · Josiah B Simon, Juliane Schicker
  • GERM 221: (re/ex)press yourself: Sexuality and Gender in Fin-de-Si├Ęcle Literature and Art

    This course explores German and Austrian literature and art of the turn of the century (c. 1880-1920) with a focus on the topics of sexuality and gender. We will read, among others, Freud, Schnitzler, Wedekind, Hofmannsthal; study artists such as Klimt and Kokoschka; and listen to composers such as Mahler, Zemlinksy, and Schoenberg. Texts and class discussions will be in English.

    6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry, Writing Requirement, International Studies; offered Spring 2018 · Juliane Schicker
  • GERM 360: Song That Sleeps in Everything

    Starting with the Baroque era, we will examine German poems as expressions of the literary movements that gave birth to them. Since the class will focus on each poem as representative of an aesthetic code grounded in specific literary movements, this class is also an excellent introduction to German literary history. We will read the poems, discuss them, listen to recordings and do our own lyrical or dramatic readings. Selections will include poems set to music, as well as twentieth century Cabaret. Interested students may also try their hand at translation.

    6 credit; Literary/Artistic Analysis; offered Spring 2018 · Sigi Leonhard