Courses (catalog)

Fall 2016

  • GERM 100: Monsters, Robots, and Other (Non-)Humans

    How do we define humans? How are we, for example, different from intelligent machines? This seminar focuses on beings who push the limits of what it means to be human, such as monsters, robots, and cyborgs. Through a discussion of works by German authors and filmmakers, alongside influential texts from other traditions (ranging from Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein to Ridley Scott’s Blade Runner), we will explore how these stories react to changing notions of humanity in the face of rapid technological and scientific progress. All readings, discussion, and coursework will be in English.

    6 credit; Argument and Inquiry Seminar, Writing Requirement, International Studies; offered Fall 2016 · S. Leonhard
  • GERM 101: Elementary German

    This course stresses a firm understanding of the basic structural patterns of the German language through reading, writing, speaking, and listening drills. For students with no previous knowledge of German or for those whose test scores indicate that this is the appropriate level of placement. 6 credit; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; offered Fall 2016 · J. Schicker
  • GERM 204: Intermediate German

    In this course, students build on basic communication skills to engage in more in-depth spoken and written discussions of German-speaking culture. By analyzing longer and more challenging texts, films and cultural media, continuing grammar review, and writing compositions, students acquire greater facility and confidence in all four language skills (writing, speaking, listening, and reading). Prerequisites: German 103 or equivalent 6 credit; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; offered Fall 2016
  • GERM 215: Refugees Welcome? Debating Migration and Multiculturalism in Post-War Germany

    This class brings together diverse voices--journalists, philosophers, and political scientists, as well as authors and filmmakers--in order to trace Germany’s contested development to a multi-ethnic and multi-religious society. Starting with the “guest worker” program of the 1960s to the ongoing refugee crisis, Germans have asked themselves “What is ‘deutsch’?” We will explore Germany’s rich history of negotiating national identity through public discourse, including topics such as German-Turkish relations, Jewish emigration after the Cold War, and the role of Islam in modern Germany. We will focus on refining students’ reading skills: We will survey works from a variety of genres, expand our vocabulary, and explore different layers of German writing through contextualization, translation, analysis and discussion. We will hone our reading strategies for works of fiction and non-fiction, discuss the pros and cons of various (online) dictionaries, and review relevant grammar topics.

    Prerequisites: German 204 or equivalent 6 credit; Literary/Artistic Analysis, International Studies; offered Fall 2016 · S. Leonhard
  • GERM 400: Integrative Exercise

    Examining an aspect of German literature across eras or genres. 6 credit; S/NC; offered Fall 2016, Winter 2017

Winter 2017

  • GERM 102: Elementary German

    Further study of the basic structural patterns of the German language. Prerequisites: German 101 or equivalent 6 credit; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; offered Winter 2017 · S. Leonhard
    Extended departmental description for GERM 102

    Taught by Lydia B. Tang

  • GERM 210: What’s Under Your Bed: Ghosts, Germans, and the Uncanny

    When was the last time you felt a chill down your spine because you thought someone was lurking behind the corner? How many stories in German do you know that can frighten you in the middle of the day? This class explores creepy and uncanny texts from the German-speaking world in the fields of literature, music, and film. Horror themes such as madness, death, and the supernatural will haunt our texts and discussions. Along the way, we discuss forms, conventions, and styles that connect the broad diversity of our texts. This is a writing-intensive courses where we will refine written expression and develop the ability to express, discuss, and argue opinions. It includes a review and expansion of grammar and stylistics.

    Prerequisites: Take German 204 or equivalent 6 credit; Literary/Artistic Analysis, International Studies; offered Winter 2017 · J. Schicker
  • GERM 400: Integrative Exercise

    Examining an aspect of German literature across eras or genres. 6 credit; S/NC; offered Fall 2016, Winter 2017

Spring 2017

  • GERM 103: Intermediate German

    Completion of the study of basic structural patterns of the German language, and the reading and discussion of a longer literary work. Prerequisites: German 102 or equivalent 6 credit; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; offered Spring 2017
  • GERM 150: The Sound of Germany: German Cultural History From Mozart to Rammstein

    In this course, we survey significant developments in German-language culture, broadly defined, from the Enlightenment to the twentieth century. Students of all disciplines and majors are invited to receive an overview of the culture of Germany, Austria, and Switzerland, starting in the 1750s and tracing its impact into the present time. The course is based on literature, film, music, language, history, habits, news, etc., and surveys major figures, movements, and their influence on the world’s civilization. The course encourages critical engagement with the material at hand and provides the opportunity to compare it with the students’ own cultural background. In translation.

    6 credit; Literary/Artistic Analysis, International Studies, Writing Requirement; offered Spring 2017 · J. Schicker
  • GERM 321: The Invention of Childhood: Coming of Age in Nineteenth-Century Germany

    This class introduces students to the cultural history of childhood through the lens of German literature and thought. Starting with the “discovery of childhood” in the age of enlightenment and concluding with the “loss of innocence” associated with Freud’s theories and Fin-de-siècle culture, we will trace changing notions of education, family life, gender, and sexuality. Our discussions will draw on a wide array of texts--including children’s literature, coming-of-age stories, pedagogical treatises, paintings, photographs, and reading primers. We will also explore how modern takes on nineteenth-century "black pedagogy" and teenage rebellion, such as Haneke’s film The White Ribbon and the Broadway musical Spring Awakening, adapt these tales of childhood terror for contemporary audiences.

    Prerequisites: One course above German 204 6 credit; Literary/Artistic Analysis, International Studies; offered Spring 2017 · S. Leonhard