Courses

Fall 2018

  • HIST 100: Confucius and His Critics

    An introduction to the study of historical biography. Instead of what we heard or think about Confucius, we will examine what his contemporaries, both his supporters and critics, thought he was. Students will scrutinize various sources gleaned from archaeology, heroic narratives, and court debates, as well as the Analects to write their own biography of Confucius based on a particular historical context that created a persistent constitutional agenda in early China. Students will justify why they would call such a finding, in hindsight, "Confucian" in its formative days. Themes can be drawn from aspects of ritual, bureaucracy, speech and writing

    6 credit; Argument and Inquiry Seminar, Writing Requirement, International Studies; offered Fall 2018 · Seungjoo Yoon
  • HIST 100: Migration and Mobility in the Medieval North

    Why did barbarians invade? Traders trade? Pilgrims travel? Vikings raid? Medieval Europe is sometimes caricatured as a world of small villages and strong traditions that saw little change between the cultural high-water marks of Rome and the Renaissance. In fact, this was a period of dynamic innovation, during which Europeans met many familiar challenges—environmental change, religious and cultural conflict, social and political competition—by traveling or migrating to seek new opportunities. This course will examine mobility and migration in northern Europe, and students will be introduced to diverse methodological approaches to their study by exploring historical and literary sources, archaeological evidence and scientific techniques involving DNA and isotopic analyses.

    6 credit; Argument and Inquiry Seminar, Writing Requirement, International Studies; offered Fall 2018 · Austin P Mason
  • HIST 100: Music and Politics in Europe since Wagner

    This course examines the often fraught, complicated relationship between music and politics from the mid-nineteenth century through the mid-twentieth. Our field of inquiry will include all of Europe, but will particularly focus on Germany, Poland, and the Soviet Union. We will look at several composers and their legacies in considerable detail, including Beethoven, Wagner, and Shostakovich. While much of our attention will be devoted to "high" or "serious" music, we will explore developments in popular music as well.

    6 credit; Argument and Inquiry Seminar, Writing Requirement, International Studies; offered Fall 2018 · David G Tompkins
  • HIST 100: Slavery and the Old South

    This seminar introduces students to developments in slavery studies since the 1970s. Then the “new social history” emphasized stories of enslaved men and women who resisted the institution. New directions zero in on facets of black bondage such as commodification, community, and comparison. Readings and writing assignments will spark discussions how history is studied, practiced, and the rationale for the discipline.

    6 credit; Argument and Inquiry Seminar, Writing Requirement, Intercultural Domestic Studies; offered Fall 2018 · Harry M Williams
  • HIST 100: Soot, Smog and Satanic Mills: Environment & Industrialization

    Soot, smog, water pollution, cholera, asthma... all of these and many more are environmental and health problems that we associate with industrialization. In this course, we trace the history of industrialization through the the lens of the impact of this major social and economic change on the built and natural environment and on public health. The course will focus on eighteenth- and nineteenth-century England, with significant comparative work on France, and a broader chronological and regional view where appropriate.

    6 credit; Argument and Inquiry Seminar, Writing Requirement, International Studies; offered Fall 2018 · Susannah R Ottaway
  • HIST 100: The Black Death: Disease and Its Consequences in the Middle Ages

    In the 1340s, the Black Death swept through the Middle East and Europe, killing up to a third of the population in some areas. How can we understand what this catastrophe meant for the people who lived and died at the time? In this seminar, we will examine the Black Death (primarily in Europe) from a range of perspectives and disciplines and through a range of sources. We will seek to understand the biological and environmental causes of the disease, therapies, and the experience of illness, but also the effects of the mortality on economic, social, religious, and cultural life.

    6 credit; Argument and Inquiry Seminar, Writing Requirement, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter, International Studies; offered Fall 2018 · Victoria Morse
  • HIST 120: Rethinking the American Experience: American History, 1607-1865

    A survey of the American experience from before Christopher Columbus' arrival through the Civil War. Some of the topics we will cover include: contact between Native and European cultures; the development of the thirteen mainland British colonies; British, French, and Spanish imperial conflicts over the Americas; slavery; the American Revolution; religious awakenings; antebellum politics; and the Civil War. 6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry, Intercultural Domestic Studies, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter; offered Fall 2018 · Serena R Zabin
  • HIST 139: Foundations of Modern Europe

    A narrative and survey of the early modern period (fifteenth through eighteenth centuries). The course examines the Renaissance, Reformation, Contact with the Americas, the Scientific Revolution and Enlightenment. We compare the development of states and societies across Western Europe, with particularly close examination of the history of Spain. 6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry, International Studies, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter; offered Fall 2018 · Susannah R Ottaway
  • HIST 173: Disaster and Society in Latin America

    Did an earthquake in the 1740s cause an anti-colonial uprising in Peru? Did a hurricane in Puerto Rico help justify U.S. colonization in 1899? Did the Sandinistas provide better disaster relief than the Nicaraguan state in 1976? In this class we will explore the relationship between natural disasters and social change in Latin America, paying attention to how environmental historians and social historians answer these questions differently. Along the way we will ask, what is a “natural” disaster? How does a society account for drastic change that is beyond human control?

    6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry, International Studies; offered Fall 2018 · Elena C McGrath
  • HIST 200: Historians for Hire

    A 2-credit course in which students work with faculty oversight to complete a variety of public history projects with community partners. Students will work on a research project requiring them to identify and analyze primary sources, draw conclusions from the primary source research, and share their research with the appropriate audience in an appropriate form. We meet once a week at Carleton to ensure students maintain professional standards and strong relationships in their work. Potential projects include educational programming, historical society archival work, and a variety of local history opportunities. 

    2 credit; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; offered Fall 2018, Winter 2019, Spring 2019 · Victoria Morse, Susannah R Ottaway
  • HIST 205: American Environmental History

    Environmental concerns, conflicts, and change mark the course of American history, from the distant colonial past to our own day. This course will consider the nature of these eco-cultural developments, focusing on the complicated ways that human thought and perception, culture and society, and natural processes and biota have all combined to forge Americans' changing relationship with the natural world. Topics will include Native American subsistence strategies, Euroamerican settlement, industrialization, urbanization, consumption, and the environmental movement. As we explore these issues, one of our overarching goals will be to develop an historical context for thinking deeply about contemporary environmental dilemmas. 6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry, Intercultural Domestic Studies; offered Fall 2018, Spring 2019 · George Vrtis
  • HIST 218: The Black Graphic Novel as Historical Narrative

    This seminar considers what makes good graphic novels by non-historians and good history written by historians trained in American traditions of scholarship. Expressionist representational narratives concerning Nat Turner, Martin Luther King, Malcolm X, and Zora Neale Hurston challenge us to rethink definitions about what is history. Discussions and paper topics for graphic novels as popular history and academic history concentrate on these topics: the subject matter or plot; the techniques for narration and representation; the truth status of products; and audience.

    Prerequisites: One course in History, American Studies or Africana Studies 6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry, Intercultural Domestic Studies; offered Fall 2018 · Harry M Williams
  • HIST 247: The First World War as Global Phenomenon

    On this centenary of the First World War, the course will explore the global context for this cataclysmic event, which provides the hinge from the nineteenth century into the twentieth. We will spend considerable time on the build-up to and causes of the conflict, with particular emphasis on the new imperialism, race-based ideologies, and the complex international struggles for global power. In addition to the fighting, we will devote a significant portion of the course to the home front and changes in society and culture during and after the war. 6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry, International Studies; offered Fall 2018 · David G Tompkins
  • HIST 259: Women in South Asia: Histories, Narratives, and Representations

    The objective of this course is to analyze the historical institutions, practices and traditions that define the position of women in India. We consider the various ways in which the trope of the Goddess has been used for and by Indian women in colonial and post-colonial India; the colonial state's supposed rescue of Indian women; the position and role of European women in colonial India; how women's bodies come to embody and signify community honor and become sites of communal contest. We explore the making of Mother India; the connection between nation, territory and the female form; and the ways in which women have been represented in history as well as Indian cinema. 

    6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry, International Studies, Writing Requirement; offered Fall 2018 · Amna Khalid
  • HIST 265: Central Asia in the Modern Age

    Central Asia--the region encompassing the post-Soviet states of Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan, and the Xinjiang region of the People's Republic of China--is often considered one of the most exotic in the world, but it has experienced all the excesses of the modern age. After a basic introduction to the long-term history of the steppe, this course will concentrate on exploring the history of the region since its conquest by the Russian and Chinese empires. We will discuss the interaction of external and local forces as we explore transformations in the realms of politics, society, culture, and religion. 6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry, International Studies; offered Fall 2018 · Adeeb Khalid
  • HIST 270: Nuclear Nations: India and Pakistan as Rival Siblings

    At the stroke of midnight on August 15, 1947 India and Pakistan, two new nation states emerged from the shadow of British colonialism. This course focuses on the political trajectories of these two rival siblings and looks at the ways in which both states use the other to forge antagonistic and belligerent nations. While this is a survey course it is not a comprehensive overview of the history of the two countries. Instead it covers some of the more significant moments of rupture and violence in the political history of the two states. The first two-thirds of the course offers a top-down, macro overview of these events and processes whereas the last third examines the ways in which people experienced these developments. We use the lens of gender to see how the physical body, especially the body of the woman, is central to the process of nation building. We will consider how women’s bodies become sites of contestation and how they are disciplined and policed by the postcolonial state(s).

    6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry, International Studies, Writing Requirement; offered Fall 2018 · Amna Khalid
  • HIST 276: Race, Sex, and Cold War in Latin America

    Wasn’t the Cold War something the U.S. and the USSR fought over? What does it have to do with Latin America, race, and sex? This global conflict was in fact not “cold” at all, as Latin American social movements, revolutionaries, and states fought over how to create a better society. Topics will include the Cuban Revolution, the global youth rebellions, dirty wars, drug wars, and the emergence of feminist, indigenous rights, LGBT rights, and anti-racist movements. The course will end by exploring how the violence of the Cold War helped create drug violence and gang warfare in the present day.

    6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry, International Studies; offered Fall 2018 · Elena C McGrath
  • HIST 298: Junior-year History Colloquium

    In the junior year, majors must take six-credit reading and discussion course taught each year by different members of the department faculty. The general purpose of History 298 is to help students reach a more sophisticated understanding of the nature of history as a discipline and of the approaches and methods of historians. A major who is considering off-campus study in the junior year should consult with their adviser on when to take History 298. 6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry; offered Fall 2018, Winter 2019 · Serena R Zabin, Adeeb Khalid
  • HIST 330: Ideas Incarnate: Institutional Formation, Reform, and Governance in the Middle Ages

    Institutions emerge from the translation of ideas, ideals, needs, and values into human communities living in particular conditions, equipped with certain resources, guided and controlled by certain norms, and protected and challenged by particular ideas and actions. Once formed, institutions encounter further issues of governance and change as they evolve and encounter new realities, success, and failure. This seminar examines the complex histories and cultures of medieval institutions—churches, monasteries, secular and religious courts, households, and the universities. Through theoretical readings and case studies we will examine how, over time, questions of purpose, leadership, the distribution of power and authority, the acquisition and disposition of material and human resources, record keeping, and legitimacy are encountered and resolved. This course will be of interest to anyone interested in the dynamics of institutions and the dialogue between concepts and material conditions as they play out in time.

    6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry, International Studies, Writing Requirement; offered Fall 2018 · William L North
  • HIST 365: Colonialism in East Asia

    This course explores the phenomenon of settler colonialism in East Asia. We will focus on the dynamics of emigration in the age of mass migration since the early nineteenth century onwards. We will begin by examining colonial encounters in which Chinese and Japanese middlemen either competed against or collaborated with the Europeans as they covered a range of areas of the globe. In the second half of the course, students will undertake projects focusing on a specific region and period of settler colonialism, identify and present source materials, develop a substantial (20-page) research paper, and engage in peer review.

    Prerequisites: One prior six credit History course 6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry, Writing Requirement, International Studies; offered Fall 2018 · Seungjoo Yoon

Winter 2019

  • HIST 137: Early Medieval Worlds

    Through the intensive exploration of a variety of distinct "worlds" in the early Middle Ages, this course offers an introduction to formative political, social, religious, and cultural developments in Europe between c.300 and c.1050. We will pay special attention to the structures, ideologies, practices, and social dynamics that shaped and energized communities large and small.  We will also focus on developing the ability to observe and interpret various kinds of textual, visual, and material primary sources. 

    6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry, International Studies, Writing Requirement; offered Winter 2019 · William L North, Austin P Mason
  • HIST 151: History of Modern Japan

    This course explores the modern transformation of Japanese society, politics, economy and culture from the Meiji Restoration of 1868 to the present. It is designed to provide students with an opportunity to explore basic issues and problems relating to modern Japanese history and international relations. Topics include the intellectual crisis of the late Tokugawa period, the Meiji Constitution, the development of an interior democracy, class and gender, the rise of Japanese fascism, the Pacific War, and postwar developments. 6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry, International Studies; offered Winter 2019 · Seungjoo Yoon
  • HIST 170: Modern Latin America 1810-Present

    What is a nation? What is progress and how can we measure it? What is the nature of a just society? How can a country built out of a colonial empire create egalitarian, participatory nations, and is that a desirable goal? What are some of the problems that arise in new nations around land, economy, political participation, and culture? In this course, we seek to answer these questions by exploring the history of Modern Latin America. Through lectures, readings, music and art, we will examine moments when peoples and governments have sought to make and change the modern world.

    6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry, International Studies; offered Winter 2019 · Elena C McGrath
  • HIST 183: History of Early West Africa

    This course surveys the history of West Africa during the pre-colonial period from 790 to 1590. It chronicles the rise and fall of the kingdoms of Ancient Ghana, Mali, and Songhai. We will examine the transition from decentralized to centralized societies, the relations between nomadic and settler groups, the institution of divine kingship, the emergence of new ruling dynasties, the consolidation of trade networks, and the development of the classical Islamic world. Students will learn how scholars have used archeological evidence, African oral traditions, and the writings of Muslim travelers to reconstruct this important era of West African history. 6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry, International Studies; offered Winter 2019 · Thabiti Willis
  • HIST 200: Historians for Hire

    A 2-credit course in which students work with faculty oversight to complete a variety of public history projects with community partners. Students will work on a research project requiring them to identify and analyze primary sources, draw conclusions from the primary source research, and share their research with the appropriate audience in an appropriate form. We meet once a week at Carleton to ensure students maintain professional standards and strong relationships in their work. Potential projects include educational programming, historical society archival work, and a variety of local history opportunities. 

    2 credit; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; offered Fall 2018, Winter 2019, Spring 2019 · Victoria Morse, Susannah R Ottaway
  • HIST 204: Jews, Christians and Muslims in the Medieval Mediterranean

    The Mediterranean was a dynamic hub of cultural exchange in the Middle Ages. We will draw on Jewish, Muslim, and Latin Christian sources to explore this contact from 1050-1492 and the role of the sea itself in joining and separating the peoples who surrounded it. What did it mean to be a Muslim pilgrim in Christian-held Palestine? A Jewish vizier serving a Muslim ruler in Spain? A Christian courtier courting martyrdom in North Africa? We will explore lives led between coexistence and violence, intellectual and legal structures that helped to negotiate difference, and the textures of daily life. 6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry, Writing Requirement, International Studies; offered Winter 2019 · Victoria Morse
  • HIST 216: History Beyond the Walls

    This course will examine the world of history outside the walls of academia. Looking at secondary-school education, museums, and public policy, we will explore the ways in which both general and specialized publics learn and think about history. A central component of the course will be a civic engagement project.

    Prerequisites: One History course 6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry, Writing Requirement, Intercultural Domestic Studies; offered Winter 2019 · Serena R Zabin
  • HIST 220: North of Jim Crow, South of Freedom

    This course analyzes the freedom struggle in the Midwest during the twentieth century. Whereas black Midwesterners drew from broader campaigns and traditions of black resistance, we will explore territorial distinctions in the region that otherwise have been flattened within the long history of civil rights discourse. To accomplish this aim, we will engage the following themes: black culture and radicalism; demographic and migratory transitions; deindustrialization and the war; gender and respectability politics; labor tensions and civil rights unionism; northern racial liberalism; and the influence of world affairs—all with an eye toward scrutinizing the freedom struggle in its Midwestern variety.

    6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry, Intercultural Domestic Studies; offered Winter 2019 · Tyran K Steward
  • HIST 229: Working with Gender in U.S. History

    Historically work has been a central location for the constitution of gender identities for both men and women; at the same time, cultural notions of gender have shaped the labor market. We will investigate the roles of race, class, and ethnicity in shaping multiple sexual divisions of labor and the ways in which terms such as skill, bread-winning and work itself were gendered. Topics will include domestic labor, slavery, industrialization, labor market segmentation, protective legislation, and the labor movement. 6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry, Intercultural Domestic Studies; offered Winter 2019 · Annette Igra
  • HIST 241: Russia through Wars and Revolutions

    The lands of the Russian empire underwent massive transformations in the tumultuous decades that separated the accession of Nicholas II (1894) from the death of Stalin (1953). This course will explore many of these changes, with special attention paid to the social and political impact of wars (the Russo-Japanese War, World War I, the Civil War, and the Great Patriotic War) and revolutions (of 1905 and 1917), the ideological conflicts they engendered, and the comparative historical context in which they transpired. 6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry, International Studies; offered Winter 2019 · Adeeb Khalid
  • HIST 262: Public Health: History, Policy, and Practice

    This course will examine the rise of the institution of public health in the modern period. Locating public health within the social history of medicine we will consider how concepts of health and disease have changed over time and how the modern state's concern with the health of its population cannot be separated from its need to survey, police, and discipline the public. Topics covered will include miasma, contagion, quarantine, vaccination and the connection between European imperialism and the institutionalization of public health in colonial contexts. We will also consider how certain epidemics became the major drivers for public health. 6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry, International Studies; offered Winter 2019 · Amna Khalid
  • HIST 268: India Program: History, Globalization, and Politics in Modern India

    Indian democracy presents a complicated social and political terrain that is being reshaped and remapped by a wide variety of efforts to bring about economic development, social change, political representation, justice, and equality. In this course we will examine, among other topics, the history of modern India with a focus on political movements centered on issues of colonialism, nationalism, class, gender, and caste. We will also examine changes in contemporary India brought about by globalization, and study how particular groups and communities have reacted and adapted to these developments.

    Prerequisites: OCS India Program 6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry, International Studies; offered Winter 2019 · Brendan P LaRocque
  • HIST 275: U.S.-Mexican Border History

    What makes a border? How do borders affect the people who live along or between them? What tools can we use to tell the story of a land divided, and what would we miss if we only examined one side of this border? This is an interdisciplinary history course that explores the social, geographical, and political history of the U.S.-Mexico border from its origins to the present day. We will look at the ways people, places and governments have shaped and contested La Linea as well the ways that La Linea has influenced scholarly approaches to nations, identity, and citizenship.

    6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry, International Studies; offered Winter 2019 · Elena C McGrath
  • HIST 298: Junior-year History Colloquium

    In the junior year, majors must take six-credit reading and discussion course taught each year by different members of the department faculty. The general purpose of History 298 is to help students reach a more sophisticated understanding of the nature of history as a discipline and of the approaches and methods of historians. A major who is considering off-campus study in the junior year should consult with their adviser on when to take History 298. 6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry; offered Fall 2018, Winter 2019 · Serena R Zabin, Adeeb Khalid
  • HIST 308: American Cities and Nature

    Since the nation's founding, the percentage of Americans living in cities has risen nearly sixteenfold, from about five percent to the current eighty-one percent. This massive change has spawned legions of others, and all of them have bearing on the complex ways that American cities and city-dwellers have shaped and reshaped the natural world. This course will consider the nature of cities in American history, giving particular attention to the dynamic linkages binding these cultural epicenters to ecological communities, environmental forces and resource flows, to eco-politics and social values, and to those seemingly far-away places we call farms and wilderness.

    Prerequisites: History 205 or permission of the instructor 6 credit; Writing Requirement, Intercultural Domestic Studies, Humanistic Inquiry; offered Winter 2019 · George Vrtis
  • HIST 347: The Global Cold War

    In the aftermath of the Second World War and through the 1980s, the United States and the Soviet Union competed for world dominance. This Cold War spawned hot wars, as well as a cultural and economic struggle for influence all over the globe. This course will look at the experience of the Cold War from the perspective of its two main adversaries, the U.S. and USSR, but will also devote considerable attention to South America, Asia, Africa, and the Middle East. Students will write a 20 page paper based on original research.

    6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry, International Studies, Writing Requirement; offered Winter 2019 · David G Tompkins
  • HIST 398: Advanced Historical Writing

    This course is designed to support majors in developing advanced skills in historical research and writing. Through a combination of class discussion, small group work, and one-on-one interactions with the professor, majors learn the process of constructing sophisticated, well-documented, and well-written historical arguments within the context of an extended project of their own design. They also learn and practice strategies for engaging critically with contemporary scholarship and effective techniques of peer review and the oral presentation of research. Concurrent enrollment in History 400 required. By permission of the instructor only. 6 credit; S/CR/NC; Humanistic Inquiry, Writing Requirement; offered Winter 2019 · Thabiti Willis, Annette Igra
  • HIST 400: Integrative Exercise

    Required of all seniors majoring in history. Registration in this course is contingent upon prior approval of a research proposal. 6 credit; S/NC; offered Winter 2019

Spring 2019

  • HIST 125: African American History I

    This survey begins with the pre-enslavement history of African Americans in West Africa. It proceeds to the transition of the slave from an African to an African American either directly or indirectly through the institution of slavery until 1865. Special attention will be given to black female activists, organizations, and philosophies proposing solutions to the African-American and Euro-American dilemma in the antebellum period.

    6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry, Intercultural Domestic Studies; offered Spring 2019 · Tyran K Steward
  • HIST 141: Europe in the Twentieth Century

    This course explores developments in European history in a global context from the final decade of the nineteenth century through to the present. We will focus on the impact of nationalism, war, and revolution on the everyday experiences of women and men, and also look more broadly on the chaotic economic, political, social, and cultural life of the period. Of particular interest will be the rise of fascism and communism, and the challenge to Western-style liberal democracy, followed by the Cold War and communism’s collapse near the end of the century. 6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry, International Studies; offered Spring 2019 · David G Tompkins
  • HIST 161: From the Mughals to Mahatma Gandhi: An Introduction to Modern Indian History

    This is an introductory survey course; no prior knowledge of South Asian History required. The goal is to familiarize students with some of the key themes and debates in the historiography of modern India. Beginning with an overview of Mughal rule in India, the main focus of the course is the colonial period. The course ends with a discussion of 1947: the hour of independence as well as the creation of two new nation-states, India and Pakistan. Topics include Oriental Despotism, colonial rule, nationalism, communalism, gender, caste and race. 

    6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry, International Studies; offered Spring 2019 · Amna Khalid
  • HIST 174: Indigenous Rights in Latin American History

    What are the origins of the vibrant indigenous rights movements that have changed politics across Latin America today? Is there something that makes current struggles different from struggles of the past? In order to answer these questions, this course asks you to think about history differently: can we imagine history as something other than a line of progress? Can political struggles be the same if the language that describes them changes? This class will explore alternative conceptions of history, agency, and change as we examine the ways indigenous people have engaged states in Latin America since the nineteenth century.

    6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry, International Studies; offered Spring 2019 · Elena C McGrath
  • HIST 184: Colonial West Africa

    This course surveys the history of West Africa during the colonial period, 1860-1960. It offers an introduction to the roles that Islam and Christianity played in establishing and maintaining colonial rule. It looks at the role of colonialism in shaping African ethnic identities and introducing new gender roles. In addition, we will examine the transition from slave labor to wage labor, and its role in exacerbating gender, generation, and class divisions among West Africans. The course also highlights some of the ritual traditions and cultural movements that flourished in response to colonial rule. 6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry, International Studies; offered Spring 2019 · Thabiti Willis
  • HIST 200: Historians for Hire

    A 2-credit course in which students work with faculty oversight to complete a variety of public history projects with community partners. Students will work on a research project requiring them to identify and analyze primary sources, draw conclusions from the primary source research, and share their research with the appropriate audience in an appropriate form. We meet once a week at Carleton to ensure students maintain professional standards and strong relationships in their work. Potential projects include educational programming, historical society archival work, and a variety of local history opportunities. 

    2 credit; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; offered Fall 2018, Winter 2019, Spring 2019 · Victoria Morse, Susannah R Ottaway
  • HIST 201: Rome Program: Building Power and Piety in Medieval Italy, CE 300-1150

    Through site visits, on-site projects, and readings, this course explores the ways in which individuals and communities attempted to give physical and visual form to their religious beliefs and political ambitions through their use of materials, iconography, topography, and architecture. We will also examine how the material legacies of imperial Rome, Byzantium, and early Christianity served as both resources for and constraints on the political, cultural, and religious evolution of the Italian peninsula and especially Rome and its environs from late antiquity through the twelfth century. Among the principal themes will be the development of the cult of saints, the development of the papal power and authority, Christianization, reform, pilgrimage, and monasticism.

    6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry, International Studies; offered Spring 2019 · William L North
  • HIST 205: American Environmental History

    Environmental concerns, conflicts, and change mark the course of American history, from the distant colonial past to our own day. This course will consider the nature of these eco-cultural developments, focusing on the complicated ways that human thought and perception, culture and society, and natural processes and biota have all combined to forge Americans' changing relationship with the natural world. Topics will include Native American subsistence strategies, Euroamerican settlement, industrialization, urbanization, consumption, and the environmental movement. As we explore these issues, one of our overarching goals will be to develop an historical context for thinking deeply about contemporary environmental dilemmas. 6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry, Intercultural Domestic Studies; offered Fall 2018, Spring 2019 · George Vrtis
  • HIST 206: Rome Program: The Eternal City in Time: Structure, Change, and Identity

    This course will explore the lived experience of the city of Rome in the twelfth-sixteenth centuries. Students will study buildings, urban forms, surviving artifacts, and textual and other visual evidence to understand how politics, power, and religion (both Christianity and Judaism) mapped onto city spaces. How did urban challenges and opportunities shape daily life? How did the memory of the past influence the present? How did the rural world affect the city and vice versa? Students will work on projects closely tied to the urban fabric.

    Prerequisites: Enrollment in OCS program 6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry, International Studies; offered Spring 2019 · Victoria Morse
  • HIST 225: James Baldwin and Black Lives Matter

    This course offers an understanding of American racial history and culture at the intersection of James Baldwin's ideas during the Civil Rights Movement about himself, the "Negro problem," American myth, human dignity, and love and the current state of local activism and campaigns under the slogan Black Lives Matter. Final papers may explore social identities beyond race.

    Prerequisites: One History course 6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry, Writing Requirement, Intercultural Domestic Studies; offered Spring 2019 · Harry M Williams
  • HIST 226: U.S. Consumer Culture

    In the period after 1880, the growth of a mass consumer society recast issues of identity, gender, race, class, family, and political life. We will explore the development of consumer culture through such topics as advertising and mass media, the body and sexuality, consumerist politics in the labor movement, and the response to the Americanization of consumption abroad. We will read contemporary critics such as Thorstein Veblen, as well as historians engaged in weighing the possibilities of abundance against the growth of corporate power. 6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry, Intercultural Domestic Studies, Writing Requirement; offered Spring 2019 · Annette Igra
  • HIST 237: The Enlightenment

    This course focuses on the texts of Enlightenment thinkers, including Locke, Montesquieu, Voltaire, Diderot, Rousseau, Kant and Mesmer. Emphasis will be on French thinkers and the effect of the Enlightenment on French society. The course covers the impact of the Enlightenment on science, religion, politics and the position of women. Students will have the opportunity to read the philosophies in French. 6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry, Writing Requirement, International Studies; offered Spring 2019 · Susannah R Ottaway
  • HIST 250: Modern Germany

    This course offers a comprehensive examination of German history in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. We will look at the German-speaking peoples of Central Europe through the prism of politics, society, culture, and the economy. Through a range of readings, we will grapple with the many complex and contentious issues that have made German history such an interesting area of intellectual inquiry. 6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry, International Studies; offered Spring 2019 · David G Tompkins
  • HIST 250F: Modern Germany-FLAC German Trailer

    This course is a supplement in German for History 250, Modern Germany, and will meet once weekly. Open to students who have completed German 103 or who have intermediate or advanced skills in German. Speaking in German, we will discuss German language primary sources, including documents, music and film clips.

    Prerequisites: German 103 or equivalent 2 credit; S/CR/NC; Humanistic Inquiry, International Studies; offered Spring 2019 · David G Tompkins
  • HIST 257: Chinese Capitalism in Global Perspective

    This course surveys the economic history of China from the sixteenth century to the present from a comparative perspective. It examines classical and recent scholarship on Chinese economic development and addresses issues, such as the global movement of capital and labor, debates on the origins of Chinese capitalism, “world-system” theories, agrarian “involution”, arguments about East Asia’s economic divergence from Europe, and market reforms “with Chinese characteristics.” In its comparative dimensions, this course will also benefit from the extended participation of historian of economics and Ott Lecturer in Economics and History, Stephen Broadberry.

    6 credit; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter, International Studies; offered Spring 2019 · Seungjoo Yoon
  • HIST 263: Plagues of Empire

    The globalization of disease is often seen as a recent phenomenon aided by high-speed communication and travel. This course examines the history of the spread of infectious diseases by exploring the connection between disease, medicine and European imperial expansion. We consider the ways in which European expansion from 1500 onwards changed the disease landscape of the world and how pre-existing diseases in the tropics shaped and thwarted imperial ambitions. We will also question how far Western medicine can be seen as a benefit by examining its role in facilitating colonial expansion and constructing racial and gender difference. 6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry, International Studies; offered Spring 2019 · Amna Khalid
  • HIST 338: Digital History, Public Heritage & Deep Mapping

    How do new methods of digital humanities and collaborative public history change our understanding of space and place? This hands-on research seminar will seek answers through a deep mapping of the long history of Northfield, Minnesota, before and after its most well-known era of the late nineteenth-century. Deep mapping is as much archaeology as it is cartography, plumbing the depths of a particular place to explore its diversity through time. Students will be introduced to major theories of space and place as well as their application through technologies such as Geographic Information Systems (GIS), 3D modeling, and video game engines. We will mount a major research project working with the National Register of Historic Places, in collaboration with specialists in public history and community partners.

    6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter, Intercultural Domestic Studies; offered Spring 2019 · Austin P Mason
  • HIST 360: Muslims and Modernity

    Through readings in primary sources in translation, we will discuss the major intellectual and cultural movements that have influenced Muslim thinkers from the nineteenth century on. Topics include modernism, nationalism, socialism, and fundamentalism.

    Prerequisites: At least one prior course in the history of the Middle East or Central Asia or Islam 6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry, Writing Requirement, International Studies; offered Spring 2019 · Adeeb Khalid
  • HIST 383: Africa's Colonial Legacies

    This course deepens understanding of the causes, manifestations, and implications of warfare in modern Africa by highlighting African perspectives on colonialism's legacies. Drawing from cases in South Africa, Uganda, Kenya, Algeria, and Sudan, the course questions whether Britain's policy of indirect rule, France's direct rule, and South Africa's apartheid rule were variants of despotism and how colonial rule shaped possibilities of resistance, reform, and repression. Students also will learn how different historical actors participated in and experienced war as well as produce an original research paper that thoughtfully uses primary and secondary resources. 

    6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry, Writing Requirement, International Studies; offered Spring 2019 · Thabiti Willis