Courses

Fall 2017

  • HIST 100: Confucius and His Critics

    An introduction to the study of historical biography. Instead of what we heard or think about Confucius, we will examine what his contemporaries, both his supporters and critics, thought he was. Students will scrutinize various sources gleaned from archaeology, heroic narratives, and court debates, as well as the Analects to write their own biography of Confucius based on a particular historical context that created a persistent constitutional agenda in early China. Students will justify why they would call such a finding, in hindsight, "Confucian" in its formative days. Themes can be drawn from aspects of ritual, bureaucracy, speech and writing

    6 credit; Argument and Inquiry Seminar, Writing Requirement, International Studies; offered Fall 2017 · Seungjoo Yoon
  • HIST 100: Exploration, Science, and Empire

    This course provides an introduction to the global history of exploration. We will examine the scientific and artistic aspects of expeditions, and consider how scientific knowledge--navigation, medicinal treatments, or the collection of scientific specimens--helped make exploration, and subsequently Western colonialism, possible. We will also explore how the visual and literary representations of exotic places shaped distant audiences’ understandings of empire and of the so-called races of the world. Art and science helped form the politics of Western nationalism and expansion; this course will explore some of the ways in which their legacy remains with us today.

    6 credit; Argument and Inquiry Seminar, Writing Requirement, International Studies; offered Fall 2017 · Tony Adler
  • HIST 100: Migration and Mobility in the Medieval North

    Why did barbarians invade? Traders trade? Pilgrims travel? Vikings raid? Medieval Europe is sometimes caricatured as a world of small villages and strong traditions that saw little change between the cultural high-water marks of Rome and the Renaissance. In fact, this was a period of dynamic innovation, during which Europeans met many familiar challenges—environmental change, religious and cultural conflict, social and political competition—by traveling or migrating to seek new opportunities. This course will examine mobility and migration in northern Europe, and students will be introduced to diverse methodological approaches to their study by exploring historical and literary sources, archaeological evidence and scientific techniques involving DNA and isotopic analyses.

    6 credit; Argument and Inquiry Seminar, Writing Requirement, International Studies; offered Fall 2017 · Austin P Mason
  • HIST 100: Soot, Smog and Satanic Mills: Environment & Industrialization

    Soot, smog, water pollution, cholera, asthma... all of these and many more are environmental and health problems that we associate with industrialization. In this course, we trace the history of industrialization through the the lens of the impact of this major social and economic change on the built and natural environment and on public health. The course will focus on eighteenth- and nineteenth-century England, with significant comparative work on France, and a broader chronological and regional view where appropriate.

    6 credit; Argument and Inquiry Seminar, Writing Requirement, International Studies; offered Fall 2017 · Susannah R Ottaway
  • HIST 122: U.S. Women's History to 1877

    Gender, race, and class shaped women's participation in the arenas of work, family life, culture, and politics in the United States from the colonial period to the late nineteenth century. We will examine diverse women's experiences of colonization, industrialization, slavery and Reconstruction, religion, sexuality and reproduction, and social reform. Readings will include both primary and secondary sources, as well as historiographic articles outlining major frameworks and debates in the field of women's history.

    6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry, Intercultural Domestic Studies; offered Fall 2017 · Annette Igra
  • HIST 171: Latin America and the U.S.

    This course provides an introduction to the rugged and highly contentious political and cultural history of Latin America--U.S. relations, from the era of Atlantic revolutions to the present. With a critical lens, we examine the forms and limits of U.S. imperial domination and coercion, as well as different strategies of collaboration, negotiation, and resistance devised by Latin Americans, from nineteenth century U.S. expansionism, to the challenges of the Mexican, Cuban and Nicaraguan Revolutions, to U.S. support for dictatorial regimes, and the evolution of neoliberal globalization, as well as recent disputes in the realms of the economy and migration.

    6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry, International Studies; offered Fall 2017 · Luis A Herran Avila
  • HIST 202: Icons, Iconoclasm, and the Quest for the Holy in Byzantium and Its Neighbors

    This course examines the nature, theory, and functions of religious images in Byzantium and surrounding regions (Armenia, Coptic Egypt, Ethiopia, the Slavic world, and the Latin West) as well as the perspectives of those who criticized them. Special attention will be paid to debates over the nature of icon veneration within Byzantine society itself and across religious boundaries; the role of images in the cult of saints; and the role of icons in the formation of religious, social, and political identities. Projects in this class will support a special exhibition in Winter 2018. History 203 winter term 2018 will require History 202 Fall 2017.

    6 credit; Writing Requirement, Humanistic Inquiry, International Studies; offered Fall 2017 · William L North
  • HIST 205: American Environmental History

    Environmental concerns, conflicts, and change mark the course of American history, from the distant colonial past to our own day. This course will consider the nature of these eco-cultural developments, focusing on the complicated ways that human thought and perception, culture and society, and natural processes and biota have all combined to forge Americans' changing relationship with the natural world. Topics will include Native American subsistence strategies, Euroamerican settlement, industrialization, urbanization, consumption, and the environmental movement. As we explore these issues, one of our overarching goals will be to develop an historical context for thinking deeply about contemporary environmental dilemmas. 6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry, Intercultural Domestic Studies; offered Fall 2017 · George Vrtis
  • HIST 213: The Age of Hamilton

    This course will examine the social, political, and cultural history of the period 1783-1830 with special consideration of the framing and ratification of the U.S. Constitution and the new nation’s transnational connections, especially to France and Haiti. Other topics include partisan conflict, political culture, nation-building, the American character, and domestic life. We will also consider the contemporary interest in this period in both politics and musical theater. Some previous knowledge of American history assumed.

    6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry, Intercultural Domestic Studies; offered Fall 2017 · Serena R Zabin
  • HIST 226: U.S. Consumer Culture

    In the period after 1880, the growth of a mass consumer society recast issues of identity, gender, race, class, family, and political life. We will explore the development of consumer culture through such topics as advertising and mass media, the body and sexuality, consumerist politics in the labor movement, and the response to the Americanization of consumption abroad. We will read contemporary critics such as Thorstein Veblen, as well as historians engaged in weighing the possibilities of abundance against the growth of corporate power. 6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry, Intercultural Domestic Studies, Writing Requirement; offered Fall 2017 · Annette Igra
  • HIST 248: Berlin Program: A German Crucible of European and Global Culture

    Berlin is the center of a transnational space that is German, European and global. This course will examine Berlin's complicated history and culture through its monuments, museums, and other sites of commemoration. Using Berlin as our text, we will gain insights into the significant historical events that shaped the society and culture of Germany's capital city. On visits to nearby cities, such as Vienna and Warsaw, we will also discuss developments in Germany and Europe more generally.

    Prerequisites: Enrollment in OCS program 6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry, International Studies; offered Fall 2017 · David G Tompkins
  • HIST 260: The Making of the Modern Middle East

    A survey of major political and social developments from the fifteenth century to the beginning of World War I. Topics include: state and society, the military and bureaucracy, religious minorities (Jews and Christians), and women in premodern Muslim societies; the encounter with modernity. 6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry, International Studies; offered Fall 2017 · Adeeb Khalid
  • HIST 270: Nuclear Nations: India and Pakistan as Rival Siblings

    At the stroke of midnight on August 15, 1947 India and Pakistan, two new nation states emerged from the shadow of British colonialism. This course focuses on the political trajectories of these two rival siblings and looks at the ways in which both states use the other to forge antagonistic and belligerent nations. While this is a survey course it is not a comprehensive overview of the history of the two countries. Instead it covers some of the more significant moments of rupture and violence in the political history of the two states. The first two-thirds of the course offers a top-down, macro overview of these events and processes whereas the last third examines the ways in which people experienced these developments. We use the lens of gender to see how the physical body, especially the body of the woman, is central to the process of nation building. We will consider how women’s bodies become sites of contestation and how they are disciplined and policed by the postcolonial state(s).

    6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry, International Studies; offered Fall 2017 · Amna Khalid
  • HIST 281: War in Modern Africa

    This course examines the causes, features, and consequences of wars across two critical phases of African history, colonial and post-colonial. It covers four cases studies from modern Central, East, and West Africa: the Congo (first under the rule of King Leopold and later the Belgian colonial government), Tanganyika (under German colonial rule), Nigeria (during the first republic through the civil war), and Uganda (under the rule of Idi Amin). Students will learn how certain memories or interpretations of events are narrated, fashioned, truncated, contested, forgotten, or silenced. Students also will learn how different historical actors participated in and experienced war.

    6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry, International Studies; offered Fall 2017 · Thabiti Willis
  • HIST 298: Junior-year History Colloquium

    In the junior year, majors must take six-credit reading and discussion course taught each year by different members of the department faculty. The general purpose of History 298 is to help students reach a more sophisticated understanding of the nature of history as a discipline and of the approaches and methods of historians. A major who is considering off-campus study in the junior year should consult with their adviser on when to take History 298. 6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry; offered Fall 2017, Winter 2018 · Serena R Zabin, Adeeb Khalid
  • HIST 341: The Russian Revolution: A Centenary Perspective

    The Russian Revolution of 1917 was one of the seminal events of the twentieth century. It transformed much beyond Russia itself. This course will take stock of the event and its legacy. What was the Russian revolution? What was its place in the history of revolutions? How did it impact the world? How was it seen by those who made it and those who witnessed it? How have these evaluations changed over time? What sense can we make of it in the year of its centenary? The revolution was both an inspiration (to many revolutionary and national-liberation movements) and used as a tale of caution and admonition (by adversaries of the Soviet Union). The readings will put the Russian revolution in the broadest perspective of the twentieth century and its contested evaluations, from within the Soviet Union and beyond, from its immediate aftermath, through World War II, the Cold War, to the post-Soviet period. The course is aimed at all students interested in the history of the twentieth century and of the idea of the revolution.

    Prerequisites: One course in Modern European History or instructor consent 6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry, Writing Requirement, International Studies; offered Fall 2017 · Adeeb Khalid

Winter 2018

  • HIST 123: U.S. Women's History Since 1877

    In the twentieth century women participated in the redefinition of politics and the state, sexuality and family life, and work and leisure as the United States became a modern, largely urban society. We will explore how the dimensions of race, class, ethnicity, and sexuality shaped diverse women's experiences of these historical changes. Topics will include: immigration, the expansion of the welfare system and the consumer economy, labor force segmentation and the world wars, and women's activism in civil rights, labor, peace and feminist movements. 6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry, Intercultural Domestic Studies; offered Winter 2018 · Annette Igra
  • HIST 158: Cold War in East Asia

    How is the Cold War in East Asia related to the global Cold War? Many argue that Cold War came prematurely in East Asia and outlasts the collapse of the Berlin Wall. Students will examine evolving patterns of the region's engagement with global dimensions of war, diplomacy, and trade and conduct a case study (e.g., Roosevelt on China, Stalin on North Korea, Kennedy on Japan, Khrushchev and Nixon on China, or Bush on North Korea). Themes may be drawn from sports and pop culture or urban renewal projects in terms of post-colonial nation building, market fundamentalism, and new empire formation. 6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry, International Studies; offered Winter 2018 · Seungjoo Yoon
  • HIST 170: Modern Latin America 1810-Present

    This course focuses on the legacy of colonial rule and asks how nascent nation-states dealt with new challenges of political legitimacy, economic development, and the rights of citizens. Case studies from the experiences of individual nations will highlight concerns still pertinent today: the ongoing struggle to extend meaningful political participation and the benefits of economic growth to the majority of the region's inhabitants, popular struggles for political, economic, and cultural rights, and the emergence of a civic society.

    6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry, International Studies; offered Winter 2018 · Luis A Herran Avila
  • HIST 181: West Africa in the Era of the Slave Trade

    The medieval Islamic and the European (or Atlantic) slave trades have had a tremendous influence on the history of Africa and the African Diaspora. This course offers an introduction to the history of West African peoples via their involvement in both of these trades from the fifteenth to the nineteenth century. More specifically, students will explore the demography, the economics, the social structure, and the ideologies of slavery. They also will learn the repercussions of these trades for men's and women's lives, for the expansion of coastal and hinterland kingdoms, and for the development of religious practices and networks. 6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry, International Studies, Writing Requirement; offered Winter 2018 · Thabiti Willis
  • HIST 203: Icons for All: Teaching an Exhibition

    In this course, students will work with a special exhibition on icons from the world of Eastern Orthodoxy to develop educational materials and programming for visitors ranging from school children to adults. Students will gain experience transforming academic knowledge into forms that enrich and enlighten a variety of publics as they learn to be docents and guides. Some attention will also be paid to the development of print, web, and direct outreach materials that will connect with the Northfield and Twin Cities communities.

    3 credit; Humanistic Inquiry, International Studies; offered Winter 2018 · William L North
  • HIST 235: Bringing the English Past to (Virtual) Life

    This course will explore the history of England from the time of the Tudors through the Industrial Revolution, with a particular focus on the history of poverty and social welfare. We will use new technologies to develop innovative ways to teach and learn about the past. Using a specially designed digital archive, students will construct life stories of paupers, politicians and intellectuals. One day per week, the class will work in a computer lab constructing 3-Dimensional, virtual institutions and designing computer game scenarios that utilize their research to recreate the lived experience of the poor. 6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry, International Studies, Writing Requirement; offered Winter 2018 · Susannah R Ottaway, Austin P Mason
  • HIST 242: Communism, Cold War, Collapse: Russia Since Stalin

    In this course we will explore the history of Russia and other former Soviet states in the period after the death of Stalin, exploring the workings of the communist system and the challenges it faced internally and internationally. We will investigate the nature of the late Soviet state and look at the different trajectories Russia and other post-Soviet states have followed since the end of the Soviet Union. 6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry, International Studies; offered Winter 2018 · Adeeb Khalid
  • HIST 259: Women in South Asia: Histories, Narratives, and Representations

    The objective of this course is to analyze the historical institutions, practices and traditions that define the position of women in India. We consider the various ways in which the trope of the Goddess has been used for and by Indian women in colonial and post-colonial India; the colonial state's supposed rescue of Indian women; the position and role of European women in colonial India; how women's bodies come to embody and signify community honor and become sites of communal contest. We explore the making of Mother India; the connection between nation, territory and the female form; and the ways in which women have been represented in history as well as Indian cinema. 

    6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry, International Studies; offered Winter 2018 · Amna Khalid
  • HIST 263: Plagues of Empire

    The globalization of disease is often seen as a recent phenomenon aided by high-speed communication and travel. This course examines the history of the spread of infectious diseases by exploring the connection between disease, medicine and European imperial expansion. We consider the ways in which European expansion from 1500 onwards changed the disease landscape of the world and how pre-existing diseases in the tropics shaped and thwarted imperial ambitions. We will also question how far Western medicine can be seen as a benefit by examining its role in facilitating colonial expansion and constructing racial and gender difference. 6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry, International Studies; offered Winter 2018 · Amna Khalid
  • HIST 277: Revolution, Rebellion, and Protest in Modern Mexico

    This course explores the afterlives and contemporary legacies of the Mexican Revolution of 1910. We engage with the history of those that rebelled against the “soft dictatorship” of Mexico’s postrevolutionary state: workers, peasants, students, intellectuals, women, indigenous peoples, and the urban poor. We examine the achievements and shortcomings of these actors and movements and their attempts to revitalize an “unfinished” revolution, and together we reflect on how old and new demands for social and political change coalesce in moments of crisis, often in radical ways.

    6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry, International Studies; offered Winter 2018 · Luis A Herran Avila
  • HIST 298: Junior-year History Colloquium

    In the junior year, majors must take six-credit reading and discussion course taught each year by different members of the department faculty. The general purpose of History 298 is to help students reach a more sophisticated understanding of the nature of history as a discipline and of the approaches and methods of historians. A major who is considering off-campus study in the junior year should consult with their adviser on when to take History 298. 6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry; offered Fall 2017, Winter 2018 · Serena R Zabin, Adeeb Khalid
  • HIST 306: American Wilderness

    This course is part of the off-campus spring break program, involving two-linked courses in winter and spring. To many Americans, wild lands are among the nation's most treasured places. Yosemite, Yellowstone, the Grand Canyon, Joshua Tree--the names alone evoke a sense of awe, naturalness, beauty, even love. But, where do those ideas and feelings come from, and how have they both reflected and shaped American cultural, political and environmental history over the last four centuries? These are the central issues and questions that we will pursue in this seminar. Prerequisites: History 205 or instructor permission 6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry, Writing Requirement, Intercultural Domestic Studies; offered Winter 2018 · George Vrtis
  • HIST 395: Voyages of Understanding

    This seminar will focus on historical understandings of the experience of travel. We will look at motivations for travel; ideas about place, space, and geography; contacts with people of different religions, ethnicities, and cultures; the effect of travel on individual and group identity; and representations of travel, cultural contact, and geography in texts, maps, and images. Each student will conduct an original research project leading to a 25-30 page research paper.  6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry, Writing Requirement, International Studies; offered Winter 2018 · Victoria Morse
  • HIST 398: Advanced Historical Writing

    This course is designed to support majors in developing advanced skills in historical research and writing. Through a combination of class discussion, small group work, and one-on-one interactions with the professor, majors learn the process of constructing sophisticated, well-documented, and well-written historical arguments within the context of an extended project of their own design. They also learn and practice strategies for engaging critically with contemporary scholarship and effective techniques of peer review and the oral presentation of research. Concurrent enrollment in History 400 required. By permission of the instructor only. 6 credit; S/CR/NC; Humanistic Inquiry, Writing Requirement; offered Winter 2018 · Thabiti Willis, Susannah R Ottaway
  • HIST 400: Integrative Exercise

    Required of all seniors majoring in history. Registration in this course is contingent upon prior approval of a research proposal. 6 credit; S/NC; offered Winter 2018

Spring 2018

  • HIST 126: African American History II

    The transition from slavery to freedom; the post-Reconstruction erosion of civil rights and the ascendancy of Booker T. Washington; protest organizations and mass migration before and during World War I; the postwar resurgence of black nationalism; African Americans in the Great Depression and World War II; roots of the modern Civil Rights movement, and black female activism. 

    6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry, Intercultural Domestic Studies; offered Spring 2018 · Clarence E Walker
  • HIST 133: Crisis, Creativity, and Transformation in Late Antiquity

    This course investigates the dramatic transformations that shaped the eastern Mediterranean world and surrounding regions between ca. 250-850 CE. We will focus in particular on how people in late antiquity used environmental, institutional, socio-economic, and cultural resources to address an ongoing series of changes and challenges in their worlds. It also examines these responses from multiple perspectives: winners and losers, elites and non-elites, people of different ethnicities and cultures, urban and rural populations, and diverse religious groups and sects within these groups. The emergence and implications of Christianity and Islam as major organizing identities will also be explored.

    6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry, Writing Requirement, International Studies; offered Spring 2018 · William L North
  • HIST 153: History of Modern China

    This course offers a critical survey of the modern transformation of the trajectory of China's recent past spanning from the eighteenth century through the present. Students will analyze deep structural issues that cut across political narratives of Chinese elites. Themes for discussion will include the debates on Chinese "capitalism," new religious currents as a form of legitimation (e.g., Tibetan Buddhism), bureaucratic behaviors, cultural refinements, peasant and sectarian rebellions, the interaction with the West, the (non-)existence of civil society, nationalism, party politics, the dynamics of Communist rule, and alternative Chinese societies both inside and outside of Mainland China. 6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry, International Studies, Writing Requirement; offered Spring 2018 · Seungjoo Yoon
  • HIST 156: History of Modern Korea

    A comparative historical survey on the development of Korean society and culture from the nineteenth century to the present. Key themes include colonialism and war, economic growth, political transformation, socio-cultural changes, and historical memory. Issues involving divided Korea will be examined in the contexts of post-colonialism and Cold War. Students are also expected to develop skills to analyze key historical moments from relevant primary sources against broader historiographical contexts. 6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry, International Studies; offered Spring 2018 · Seungjoo Yoon
  • HIST 161: From the Mughals to Mahatma Gandhi: An Introduction to Modern Indian History

    This is an introductory survey course; no prior knowledge of South Asian History required. The goal is to familiarize students with some of the key themes and debates in the historiography of modern India. Beginning with an overview of Mughal rule in India, the main focus of the course is the colonial period. The course ends with a discussion of 1947: the hour of independence as well as the creation of two new nation-states, India and Pakistan. Topics include Oriental Despotism, colonial rule, nationalism, communalism, gender, caste and race. 

    6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry, International Studies, Writing Requirement; offered Spring 2018 · Amna Khalid
  • HIST 165: From Young Turks to Arab Revolutions: A Cultural History of the Modern Middle East

    This course provides a basic introduction to the history of the wider Muslim world from the eighteenth century to the present. We will discuss the cultural and religious diversity of the Muslim world and its varied interactions with modernity. We will find that the history of the Muslim world is inextricably linked to that of its neighbors, and we will encounter colonialism, anti-colonialism, nationalism, and socialism, as well as a variety of different Islamic movements. 6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry, International Studies; offered Spring 2018 · Adeeb Khalid
  • HIST 172: Latin America’s Global Migrations

    This course looks at Latin America as a site of global migrants and migrations. Alongside better-known cases of Latin American migration to the United States, we examine the long history of African, European, Asian, and Middle Eastern diasporas in the region. The course stresses the global interconnections of the region’s circuits of mobility, as well as the various economic, political, and cultural factors informing the movement and settlement of diverse populations throughout the hemisphere.

    6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry, International Studies; offered Spring 2018 · Luis A Herran Avila
  • HIST 208: The Atlantic World: Columbus to the Age of Revolutions, 1492-1792

    In the late fifteenth century, the Atlantic ocean became a vast highway linking Spain, France, Britain, and the Netherlands to the Americas and Africa. This course will examine the lives of the men and women who inhabited this new world from the time of Columbus to the eighteenth-century revolutions in Haiti and North America. We will focus on the links between continents rather than the geographic segments. Topics will include the destruction and reconfiguration of indigenous societies; slavery and other forms of servitude; religion; war; and the construction of ideas of empire. Students considering a concentration in Atlantic History are particularly encouraged to enroll. Emphasis on primary sources. 6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry, International Studies; offered Spring 2018 · Serena R Zabin
  • HIST 211: Puritans, Sex and Slavery

    An intensive exploration of particular topics in early American history in its context as part of an Atlantic world. Topics will include voluntary and involuntary migration from Europe and Africa, personal, political, and military relationships between Europeans and Native Americans, the pattern of colonial settlement and politics, concepts of family and community, strategies of cultural adaptation and resistance, slavery, religion, the making of racial, rank, and gender ideologies, and the development of British and American identities.

    6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry, Intercultural Domestic Studies; offered Spring 2018 · Serena R Zabin
  • HIST 222: Slavery in Film, Literature, and History

    This course focuses on the representation of slavery in popular American movies and novels. Movies are a universal language and what most Americans know about the United States and World history today they have “learned” at the movies. Movies can make understanding the past seem easy because they do not require the people observing them to think—they can just sit and enjoy the story. But this is not true of films and novels that address crucial issues like slavery. Slavery in the U.S. and globally was and remains a moral question. People are pro, anti, or indifferent to slavery and its legacies, and their responses to representations of human bondage can reveal a lot about contemporary attitudes about race and gender. In this class we will examine this process by looking at a range of films (e.g., Gone With The Wind, 12 Years a Slave,  Django, and Mandingo). We will contextualize the films with both primary and secondary texts. 

    6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry, Intercultural Domestic Studies; offered Spring 2018 · Clarence E Walker
  • HIST 231: Mapping the World Before Mercator

    This course will explore early maps primarily in medieval and early modern Europe. After an introduction to the rhetoric of maps and world cartography, we will examine the functions and forms of medieval European and Islamic maps and then look closely at the continuities and transformations in map-making during the period of European exploration. The focus of the course will be on understanding each map within its own cultural context and how maps can be used to answer historical questions. We will work closely with the maps in Gould Library Special Collections to expand campus awareness of the collection. 6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry, Writing Requirement, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter, International Studies; offered Spring 2018 · Victoria Morse
  • HIST 243: The Peasants are Revolting! Society and Politics in the Making of Modern France

    Political propaganda of the French Revolutionary period tells a simple story of downtrodden peasants exploited by callous nobles, but what exactly was the relationship between the political transformations of France from the Renaissance through the French Revolution and the social, religious, and cultural tensions that characterized the era? This course explores the connections and conflicts between popular and elite culture as we survey French history from the sixteenth through early nineteenth centuries, making comparisons to social and political developments in other European countries along the way. 6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry, International Studies, Writing Requirement, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter; offered Spring 2018 · Susannah R Ottaway
  • HIST 246: The Material World of the Anglo-Saxons

    This course explores the world of Anglo-Saxon England from Rome's decline through the Norman Conquest (c.400-1066) through the lens of material culture. These six centuries witnessed dramatic transformations, including changing environmental conditions, ethnic migrations, the coming of Christianity, waning Roman influence, the rise of kingdoms, and the emergence of new agricultural and economic regimes. We will look beyond the kings and priests at the top of society by analyzing objects people made and used, buildings they built, and human remains they buried alongside primary and secondary written sources. Students will gain experience in how to write history from "things." 6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry, International Studies; offered Spring 2018 · Austin P Mason
  • HIST 253: The Cultural Revolution in China

    What is cultural about the Cultural Revolution in China? What is Chinese about it? This course explores the process of making the revolution that has left an indelible mark on the country that hosts a quarter of the world’s population. Students will examine tabloids, wall posters, cartoons, photographs, pamphlets, play scripts, rumor mills, memoirs, films, and party documents to independently assess the official CCP verdict on it as a “failure.” Themes include democracy and development in making a revolution, social stratification, spectacles and story-telling, legitimatization of violence, personality formation, operations of memory, and competing notions of time in historical thinking.

    6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry, Writing Requirement, International Studies; offered Spring 2018 · Seungjoo Yoon
  • HIST 262: Public Health: History, Policy, and Practice

    This course will examine the rise of the institution of public health in the modern period. Locating public health within the social history of medicine we will consider how concepts of health and disease have changed over time and how the modern state's concern with the health of its population cannot be separated from its need to survey, police, and discipline the public. Topics covered will include miasma, contagion, quarantine, vaccination and the connection between European imperialism and the institutionalization of public health in colonial contexts. We will also consider how certain epidemics became the major drivers for public health. 6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry, International Studies; offered Spring 2018 · Amna Khalid
  • HIST 279: Latin America and the Global Cold War

    This course explores the history, memory, and legacies of Latin America’s Cold War through a global lens. The course stresses the agency and autonomy of Latin American actors vis-à-vis U.S. and Soviet influence, and looks at the region as an active participant in larger global struggles over reform, revolution, and counterrevolution. Combining recent scholarly interpretations of the period and the use of primary sources for student projects, the course provides a grasp of how Latin Americans experienced the Cold War through resistance, consent, and negotiation in the realms of politics, culture, and the economy.

    6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry, International Studies; offered Spring 2018 · Luis A Herran Avila
  • HIST 287: From Alchemy to the Atom Bomb: The Scientific Revolution and the Making of the Modern World

    This course examines the growth of modern science since the Renaissance with an emphasis on the Scientific Revolution, the development of scientific methodology, and the emergence of new scientific disciplines. How might a history of science focused on scientific networks operating within society, rather than on individual scientists, change our understanding of “genius,” “progress,” and “scientific impartiality?” We will consider a range of scientific developments, treating science both as a body of knowledge and as a set of practices, and will gauge the extent to which our knowledge of the natural world is tied to who, when, and where such knowledge has been produced and circulated.

    6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry, Writing Requirement; offered Spring 2018 · Tony Adler
  • HIST 307: Wilderness Field Studies: Grand Canyon

    This course is the second half of a two-course sequence focused on the study of wilderness in American society and culture. The course will begin with a two-week off-campus study program during spring break at the Grand Canyon, where we will learn about the natural and human history of the Grand Canyon, examine contemporary issues facing the park, meet with officials from the National Park Service and other local experts, conduct research, and experience the park through hiking and camping. The course will culminate in the spring term with the completion and presentation of a major research project.

    Prerequisites: History 306 6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry, Writing Requirement, Intercultural Domestic Studies; offered Spring 2018 · George Vrtis
  • HIST 386: Africa: Art, Nation, and Politics

    This course explores “Africa” as a historical construction, place, culture, artistic practice, commodity, and identity shaped by imperial ambitions, global trade, religious impulses, aesthetic forms, memory, and struggles for sovereignty. It illustrates how art, nationalism, and politics have been at the center of ideas about Africa and its relationship to colonialism and modernity from the nineteenth century to current times. In addition to select case studies, students will work with diverse sources such as missionary accounts, speeches, press releases, visual art, songs, and musical performances. Students will produce an original research paper of fifteen to twenty pages using primary and secondary resources. 

    6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry, Writing Requirement, International Studies; offered Spring 2018 · Thabiti Willis