Courses

Fall 2017

  • ARBC 101: Elementary Arabic

    This course sequence introduces non-Arabic speakers to the sounds, script, and basic grammar of Arabic-the language of 200 million speakers in the Arab world and the liturgical language of over a billion Muslims. Students will develop basic listening, speaking, reading and writing skills in Modern Standard Arabic. Classes will incorporate readings and audio-visual material from contemporary Arabic media, as well as popular music. 6 credit; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; offered Fall 2017 · Zaki A Haidar
  • HEBR 103: Elementary Modern Hebrew

    This course is for students who have completed Hebrew 102 or whose test scores indicate that this is an appropriate level of placement. We continue expanding our vocabulary and grammar knowledge, integrating listening, speaking, reading, and writing in Hebrew. We also continue working with Israeli films and internet, particularly to publish in-class magazines in Hebrew on topics related to Israel, the Middle East, and Judaic Studies. Prerequisites: Hebrew 102 or equivalent 6 credit; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; offered Fall 2017 · Stacy N Beckwith
  • ARBC 204: Intermediate Arabic

    In this course sequence students will continue to develop their reading, writing, listening and speaking skills, while building a solid foundation of Arabic grammar (morphology and syntax). Students will develop their ability to express ideas in Modern Standard Arabic by writing essays and preparing oral presentations. Classes will incorporate readings and audio-visual material from contemporary Arabic media, as well as popular music. Prerequisites: Arabic 103 or equivalent 6 credit; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; offered Fall 2017 · Zaki A Haidar

Winter 2018

  • ARBC 102: Elementary Arabic

    This course sequence introduces non-Arabic speakers to the sounds, script, and basic grammar of Arabic--the language of 200 million speakers in the Arab world and the liturgical language of over a billion Muslims. Students will develop basic listening, speaking, reading and writing skills in Modern Standard Arabic. Classes will incorporate readings and audio-visual material from contemporary Arabic media, as well as popular music. Prerequisites: Arabic 101 or equivalent 6 credit; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; offered Winter 2018 · Zaki A Haidar
  • ARBC 144: Arabic Literature at War

    Arabic literature is a vibrant and humane tradition. At the same time, several Arab societies have experienced periods of exceedingly violent conflict throughout the twentieth and into the twenty-first centuries. In this course, we will investigate the ways these two currents—war and the literary—converge in several Arab societies. As members of societies at war, but also as literary artists, how do authors represent these conflicting narratives? What sorts of war stories do they tell, how do they tell them, and what sort of literary practice is produced? We will study the birth of the Lebanese Civil War novel as a bona fide genre in the 1970s and 80s, how literature informed anti-colonial struggles in Palestine and Algeria from the 1950s to the present, and read some works of genre-bending horror and science fiction that have appeared in the wake of Iraq’s recent destruction. Taught in English, no knowledge of Arabic is required.

    6 credit; Literary/Artistic Analysis, Writing Requirement, International Studies; offered Winter 2018 · Zaki A Haidar
  • HEBR 204: Intermediate Modern Hebrew

    In this course students will strengthen their command of modern conversational, literary and newspaper Hebrew. As in the elementary sequence, we will continually integrate listening, speaking, reading, and writing in Hebrew. Popular Israeli music, broadcasts, internet sources, and films will complement the course's goals. Class projects include a term long research paper on a topic related to Israel, the Middle East, or Judaic Studies. Students will create a poster in Hebrew to illustrate their research. They will discuss this with other Hebrew speakers on campus at a class poster session toward the end of the course. Prerequisites: Hebrew 103 or equivalent 6 credit; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; offered Winter 2018 · Stacy N Beckwith
  • ARBC 205: Intermediate Arabic

    In this course sequence students will continue to develop their reading, writing, listening and speaking skills, while building a solid foundation of Arabic grammar (morphology and syntax). Students will develop their ability to express ideas in Modern Standard Arabic by writing essays and preparing oral presentations. Classes will incorporate readings and audio-visual material from contemporary Arabic media, as well as popular music. Prerequisites: Arabic 204 or equivalent 6 credit; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; offered Winter 2018 · Yaron Klein
  • ARBC 286: Narratives of Arab Modernity

    In this course, we will read formative works of modern Arabic literature from Iraq, Egypt, Lebanon, Syria and Palestine. We will trace the processes of societal and literary transformation, from the texts of the nahda or Arabic literary and intellectual renaissance, to contemporary works written in the era of Arab "springs" and revolutions. We will approach these literary texts--poetry, fiction, and graphic novels-- as works of literature with aesthetic claims upon us as readers, even as we treat the contentious relationship between the literary and the political in a period marked by colonialism, nationalism, war, revolution, Islamism and secularism. All readings are in English. 6 credit; Literary/Artistic Analysis, International Studies; offered Winter 2018 · Zaki A Haidar

Spring 2018

  • ARBC 103: Elementary Arabic

    This course sequence introduces non-Arabic speakers to the sounds, script, and basic grammar of Arabic--the language of 200 million speakers in the Arab world and the liturgical language of over a billion Muslims. Students will develop basic listening, speaking, reading and writing skills in Modern Standard Arabic. Classes will incorporate readings and audio-visual material from contemporary Arabic media, as well as popular music. Prerequisites: Arabic 102 or equivalent 6 credit; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; offered Spring 2018 · Zaki A Haidar
  • ARBC 185: The Creation of Classical Arabic Literature

    In this course we will explore the emergence of Arabic literature in one of the most exciting and important periods in the history of the Islamic and Arab world; a time in which pre-Islamic Arabian lore was combined with translated Persian wisdom literature and Greek scientific and philosophical writings. We will explore some of the different literary genres that emerged in the New Arab courts and urban centers: from wine and love poetry, historical and humorous anecdotes, to the Thousand and One Nights, and discuss the socio-historical forces and institutions that shaped them. All readings are in English. No Arabic knowledge required. 6 credit; Literary/Artistic Analysis, International Studies; offered Spring 2018 · Yaron Klein
  • ARBC 206: Arabic in Cultural Context

    In this course students will continue to develop their Arabic language skills, including expanding their command of Arabic grammar, improving their listening comprehension, reading and writing skills. In addition to more language-focused training, the course will introduce students to more¬†advanced readings, including literary texts (prose and poetry, classical and modern) and op-ed articles from current media. Class discussions will be in Arabic. Prerequisites: Arabic 205 or equivalent 6 credit; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; offered Spring 2018 · Zaki A Haidar
  • ARBC 387: The One Thousand and One Nights

    This course is an exploration of the world of the Thousand and One Nights, the most renowned Arabic literary work of all time. The marvelous tales spun by Shahrazad have captured and excited the imagination of readers and listeners--both Arab and non-Arab--for centuries. In class, we will read in Arabic, selections from the Nights, and engage some of the scholarly debates surrounding this timeless work. We will discuss the question of its origin in folklore and popular culture and the mystery of its "authorship," as well as the winding tale of its reception, adaptation and translation. Readings and class discussions will be in both Arabic and English.

    Prerequisites: Arabic 206 6 credit; Literary/Artistic Analysis, International Studies; offered Spring 2018 · Yaron Klein