Courses

Fall 2017

  • POSC 100: Political Thought Malcolm X & Martin Luther King, Jr

    What justifies self-defense and retaliation in defending civil rights and liberty? What moral reasoning and strategies offer alternatives to using physical violence in a social movement to gain civil rights? Our seminar examines the American Civil Rights Movement 1954 and 1968, and compares the writings of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and Malcolm X to learn about nonviolent direct action, self-defense, and the use of "any means necessary" to right the wrongs of racial injustice.

    6 credit; Argument and Inquiry Seminar, Writing Requirement, Intercultural Domestic Studies; offered Fall 2017 · Barbara Allen
  • POSC 100: Society in Silico

    Can models help us understand the social world? Vexing issues like segregation, economic inequality, corruption, market failure, resource over-exploitation, genocide, insurgency and terrorism have inspired scholars to ask if computational models of social systems can shed light on the hard-to-observe micro processes underlying macro problems. In this course we will explore the conceptual and empirical foundations of modeling especially in complex systems. We will read about, then experiment with, existing models while students learn to program their own using open-source software. 

    6 credit; Argument and Inquiry Seminar, Writing Requirement, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter, International Studies; offered Fall 2017 · Greg Marfleet
  • POSC 120: Democracy and Dictatorship

    An introduction to the array of different democratic and authoritarian political institutions in both developing and developed countries. We will also explore key issues in contemporary politics in countries around the world, such as nationalism and independence movements, revolution, regime change, state-making, and social movements. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, International Studies, Writing Requirement; offered Fall 2017, Winter 2018, Spring 2018 · Dev Gupta, Kent Freeze
  • POSC 122: Politics in America: Liberty and Equality

    An introduction to American government and politics. Focus on the Congress, Presidency, political parties and interest groups, the courts and the Constitution. Particular attention will be given to the public policy debates that divide liberals and conservatives and how these divisions are rooted in American political culture. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, Intercultural Domestic Studies, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter, Writing Requirement; offered Fall 2017, Winter 2018 · Christina E Farhart
  • POSC 160: Political Philosophy

    Introduction to ancient and modern political philosophy. We will investigate several fundamentally different approaches to the basic questions of politics--questions concerning the character of political life, the possibilities and limits of politics, justice, and the good society--and the philosophic presuppositions (concerning human nature and human flourishing) that underlie these, and all, political questions. 6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry, Writing Requirement; offered Fall 2017, Spring 2018 · Mihaela Czobor-Lupp, Heather Pangle
  • POSC 180: Global Politics & Local Communities

    The 1989 fall of the Berlin Wall signaled beginnings of “a new world order,” to use the words of President George HW Bush. With the increased attention to transnational issues like terrorism, climate change, immigration, and a global AIDS epidemic, the cooperative ideal was a welcome turn from Cold War competition. But three decades later we see nuclear arms stalemates, a rise of nationalist politics, exit from global agreements….What happened? How are local communities affected by changing views of globalization? This class examines debates in International Relations and domestic policy that address that question and the practice of global governance.

    6 credit; Social Inquiry, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter; offered Fall 2017 · Barbara Allen
  • POSC 207: Global Decline of Democracy: Urban Revanchism and Popular Resistance

    Our focus will be on policing, gentrification, gated communities and other tools for reclaiming and fortifying metropolitan space, as well as citizen responses. What community exists, for whom?

    6 credit; Social Inquiry, International Studies; offered Fall 2017 · Richard A Keiser
  • POSC 208: Presidential Elections, Gridlock and Policy Strategy

    Part One will focus on the process of candidate nomination and explanations for presidential elections. Part Two will focus on gridlock, Executive Branch tools, and strategies for governance in the midst of division.

    6 credit; Social Inquiry, Intercultural Domestic Studies; offered Fall 2017 · Richard A Keiser
  • POSC 224: Measuring and Evaluating Social and Ecological Systems

    The Institutional Analysis and Development (IAD) and Social Ecological Systems (SES) Frameworks are designed to provide data on social, economic, and political institutions and the physical environment enabling us to understand the reciprocal effects of institutional and environmental change. We will learn these frameworks and the methods used to measure changes in natural resource systems. We study measurement, monitoring, and management of prairie and forest ecosystems in local agricultural use and restoration projects. Much of the course occurs on site in field trip locations.

    3 credit; Social Inquiry, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter, International Studies; offered Fall 2017 · Barbara Allen
  • POSC 230: Methods of Political Research

    An introduction to research method, research design, and the analysis of political data. The course is intended to introduce students to the fundamentals of scientific inquiry as they are employed in the discipline. The course will consider the philosophy of scientific research generally, the philosophy of social science research, theory building and theory testing, the components of applied (quantitative and qualitative) research across the major sub-fields of political science, and basic methodological tools. Intended for majors only. Prerequisites: Mathematics 115, 215, 245, or AP Statistics (score of 4 or 5) 6 credit; Social Inquiry, Writing Requirement, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter; offered Fall 2017, Winter 2018, Spring 2018 · Bryan R Daves, Kent Freeze
  • POSC 232: Chinese Foreign Policy

    The "Rise of China" over the past thirty-five years presents challenges and opportunities for the United States and other countries around the world. This course examines China's growing and changing influence in the world. The course starts by exploring historical Chinese foreign policy, from Imperial China through the Cold War. The course then examines a variety of different theories and factors explaining the general nature of China's foreign policy. The course concludes by detailing China's current bilateral relationships with specific countries and regions around the world.

    6 credit; International Studies, Social Inquiry; offered Fall 2017 · Kent Freeze
  • POSC 234: Israeli Politics

    Although Israel is a relatively young country, its politics are rich and dynamic; some might say that they are contentious and Byzantine. In this course, we examine the ideological basis of what unites and divides Israelis, the foundation and basic operations of Israel’s political system, the voting behavior of its citizens, and the key points of focus in Israel’s most heated political disputes.

    6 credit; Social Inquiry, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter, International Studies; offered Fall 2017 · Bryan R Daves
  • POSC 248: Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD)

    What does that really mean? This course will afford students the opportunity to learn about nuclear, radiological, biological, chemical, and cyber WMD. We’ll explore how these weapons are built, what happens when they are used, and how they are controlled—or not—by international security agreements. A multi-disciplinary approach will be used. Professors from the political science, chemistry, physics, computer science, biology, and philosophy departments will each contribute specific sections and, along with guest lecturers, augment our discussions on questions of global and national security policy.

    6 credit; Social Inquiry, International Studies; offered Fall 2017 · Jon R Olson
  • POSC 255: Post-Modern Political Thought

    The thought and practice of the modern age have been found irredeemably oppressive, alienating, dehumanizing, and/or exhausted by a number of leading philosophic thinkers in recent years. In this course we will explore the critiques and alternative visions offered by a variety of post-modern thinkers, including Nietzsche (in many ways the first post-modern), Heidegger, Foucault, and Derrida. 6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry; offered Fall 2017 · Mihaela Czobor-Lupp
  • POSC 271: Constitutional Law I

    Covers American constitutional law and history from the founding to the breakdown of the constitution in secession crisis. Extensive attention will be paid to the constitutional convention and other sources of constitutional law in addition to Supreme Court cases. 6 credit; Social Inquiry; offered Fall 2017 · Kimberly K Smith
  • POSC 273: Race and Politics in the U.S.

    This course addresses race and ethnicity in U.S. politics. Following an introduction to historical, sociological, and psychological approaches to the study of race and ethnicity, we apply these approaches to understanding the ways in which racial attitudes have been structured along a number of political and policy dimensions, e.g., welfare, education, criminal justice. Students will gain an increased understanding of the multiple contexts that shape contemporary racial and ethnic politics and policies in the U.S., and will consider the role of institutional design, policy development, representation, and racial attitudes among the general U.S. public and political environment.

    6 credit; Social Inquiry, Intercultural Domestic Studies; offered Fall 2017 · Christina E Farhart
  • POSC 331: Cooperation and Conflict*

    Why do countries go to war? What conditions promote a lasting peace? These may well be the two most important and enduring questions in international politics. The course combines an exploration of various theoretical approaches to war and peace—including rational, psychological and structural models—with an empirical analysis of the onset, escalation, and resolution of conflict. We investigate changing patterns in the frequency of global violence and identify where it occurs more (and less) often and assess whether there is an overall trend toward a more peaceful world.

    6 credit; Social Inquiry, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter, International Studies; offered Fall 2017 · Greg Marfleet
  • POSC 358: Comparative Social Movements*

    This course will examine the role that social movements play in political life. The first part of the course will critically review the major theories that have been developed to explain how social movements form, operate and seek to influence politics at both the domestic and international levels. In the second part of the course, these theoretical approaches will be used to explore a number of case studies involving social movements that span several different issue areas and political regions. Potential case studies include the transnational environmental movement, religious movements in Latin America and the recent growth of far right activism in northern Europe. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, International Studies; offered Fall 2017 · Dev Gupta
  • POSC 361: Approaches to Development*

    The meaning of "development" has been contested across multiple disciplines. The development and continual existence of past civilizations has been at the core of the discourse among those who study factors leading to the rise and fall of civilizations. Can we reconcile the meaning of development in economic terms with cultural, ecological, political, religious, social and spiritual terms? How can we measure it quantitatively? What and how do the UNDP Human Development Indexes and the World Development Reports measure? What are the exemplary cases that illustrate development? How do individual choices and patterns of livelihood activities link to development trends? 6 credit; Social Inquiry, Writing Requirement, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter, International Studies; offered Fall 2017 · Tun Myint

Winter 2018

  • POSC 120: Democracy and Dictatorship

    An introduction to the array of different democratic and authoritarian political institutions in both developing and developed countries. We will also explore key issues in contemporary politics in countries around the world, such as nationalism and independence movements, revolution, regime change, state-making, and social movements. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, International Studies, Writing Requirement; offered Fall 2017, Winter 2018, Spring 2018 · Dev Gupta, Kent Freeze
  • POSC 122: Politics in America: Liberty and Equality

    An introduction to American government and politics. Focus on the Congress, Presidency, political parties and interest groups, the courts and the Constitution. Particular attention will be given to the public policy debates that divide liberals and conservatives and how these divisions are rooted in American political culture. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, Intercultural Domestic Studies, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter, Writing Requirement; offered Fall 2017, Winter 2018 · Christina E Farhart
  • POSC 170: International Relations and World Politics

    What are the foundational theories and practices of international relations and world politics? This course addresses topics of a geopolitical, commercial and ideological character as they relate to global systems including: great power politics, polycentricity, and international organizations. It also explores the dynamic intersection of world politics with war, terrorism, nuclear weapons, national security, human security, human rights, and the globalization of economic and social development. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, International Studies; offered Winter 2018, Spring 2018 · Tun Myint, Hicham N Bou Nassif
  • POSC 210: Misinformation, Political Rumors, and Conspiracy Theories

    Why do people believe in conspiracy theories, hold on to misinformed beliefs even in the face of mounting evidence to the contrary, and/or spread political and social rumors that may have little basis in fact? Who is most vulnerable to these various forms of misinformation? What are the normative and political consequences of misperceptions (if any)? This course explores the psychological, political, and philosophical approaches to the study of the causes, consequences, and tenacity of conspiracy beliefs, misinformation, and political rumors, as well as possible approaches that journalists could employ to combat misperceptions.

    6 credit; Social Inquiry, Intercultural Domestic Studies; offered Winter 2018 · Christina E Farhart
  • POSC 212: Environmental Justice

    The environmental justice movement seeks greater participation by marginalized communities in environmental policy, and equity in the distribution of environmental harms and benefits. This course will examine the meaning of "environmental justice," the history of the movement, the empirical foundation for the movement's claims, and specific policy questions. Our focus is the United States, but students will have the opportunity to research environmental justice in other countries. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter, Intercultural Domestic Studies; offered Winter 2018 · Kimberly K Smith
  • POSC 220: Politics and Political History in Film

    How do representations of politics in film influence our ideas about governance, citizenship, power, and authority? How do film and TV reflect values and beliefs of democratic society, particularly in the United States? These are two questions that we will consider in the course as we study films representing politics and historical events in fiction and non-fiction genres for entertainment and education. Films to be analyzed include: Battle of Algiers, Fog of War, Cape Fear (1963), Manchurian Candidate (1960), Advise and Consent, All the President's Men, Primary, War Room, The Mushroom Club, Fahrenheit 9/11, When the Levees Broke. 6 credit; Literary/Artistic Analysis, International Studies; offered Winter 2018 · Barbara Allen
  • POSC 230: Methods of Political Research

    An introduction to research method, research design, and the analysis of political data. The course is intended to introduce students to the fundamentals of scientific inquiry as they are employed in the discipline. The course will consider the philosophy of scientific research generally, the philosophy of social science research, theory building and theory testing, the components of applied (quantitative and qualitative) research across the major sub-fields of political science, and basic methodological tools. Intended for majors only. Prerequisites: Mathematics 115, 215, 245, or AP Statistics (score of 4 or 5) 6 credit; Social Inquiry, Writing Requirement, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter; offered Fall 2017, Winter 2018, Spring 2018 · Bryan R Daves, Kent Freeze
  • POSC 236: Global, National and Human Security

    What are the greatest threats to national and global security? In this course we will explore a range of traditional security topics including: the proliferation of WMDs, terrorism, piracy, insurgencies, arms races, territorial disputes and strategic rivalries. In addition to these classic concerns, we also consider newer ones such as cyber-security, the threat of global pandemics, unmanned warfare and the impact of climate change. Our study begins and concludes with the debate over the concept of security in the twenty-first century. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, International Studies; offered Winter 2018 · Greg Marfleet
  • POSC 238: Sport & Globalization London/Seville Pgm: Globalization and Development: Lessons from Int'l Football

    This course uses international football (soccer) as a lens to analyze topics in globalization, such as immigration and labor, inequality, foreign investment, trade in services, and intellectual property. Students will be presented with key debates in these areas and then use cases from international football as illustrations. Focusing on the two wealthiest leagues in Europe, the English Premier League and the Spanish Liga, students will address key issues in the study of globalization and development, and in doing so enhance their understanding of the world, sports, and sport's place in the world. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, International Studies; offered Winter 2018 · Bob Carlson
  • POSC 241: Ethnic Conflict

    Ethnic conflict is a persistent and troubling challenge for those interested in preserving international peace and stability. By one account, ethnic violence has claimed more than ten million lives since 1945, and in the 1990s, ethnic conflicts comprised nearly half of all ongoing conflicts around the world. In this course, we will attempt to understand the conditions that contribute to ethnic tensions, identify the triggers that lead to escalation, and evaluate alternative ideas for managing and solving such disputes. The course will draw on a number of cases, including Rwanda, Bosnia, and Northern Ireland. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, International Studies; offered Winter 2018 · Dev Gupta
  • POSC 266: Urban Political Economy

    City revenue is increasingly dependent on tourism. Cities manufacture identity and entertainment, whether we think of Las Vegas or Jerusalem, Berlin or Bilbao, the ethnoscapes of Copenhagen or the red light district of Amsterdam. As cities compete in the global economy to become playgrounds for a transnational tourist class, what is the role of urban residents? Who governs? Who benefits? Short essays or exams will be required. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, Intercultural Domestic Studies; offered Winter 2018 · Richard A Keiser
  • POSC 268: Global Environmental Politics and Policy

    Global environmental politics and policy is the most prominent field that challenges traditional state-centric ways of thinking about international problems and solutions. This course examines local-global dynamics of environmental problems. The course will cover five arenas crucial to understanding the nature and origin of global environmental politics and policymaking mechanisms: (1) international environmental law; (2) world political orders; (3) human-environment interactions through politics and markets; (4) paradigms of sustainable development; and (5) dynamics of human values and rules. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, Writing Requirement, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter, International Studies; offered Winter 2018 · Tun Myint
  • POSC 272: Constitutional Law II

    Covers American constitutional law and history from Reconstruction to the contemporary era. Extensive attention will be paid to the effort to refound the American constitution following the Civil War as manifest in the thirteenth, fourteenth, and fifteenth amendments, and to the successive transformations which the Supreme Court worked in the new constitutional order. Political Science 271 is not a prerequisite. 6 credit; Social Inquiry; offered Winter 2018 · Kimberly K Smith
  • POSC 283: Separatist Movements

    This course explores the emergence and resolution of separatist movements around the world. While separatist movements are often associated with the violent dissolution of states, not all separatist movements result in violence and not all separatist movements seek independence. We will investigate the conditions under which separatist pressures are most likely to develop and when such pressures result in actual separation. We will contrast the tactics of movements, from peaceful approaches in places like contemporary Quebec or Scotland, to peaceful outcomes like the "velvet divorce" of Czechoslovakia, to violent insurrections in places like the Philippines, Spain, and Northern Ireland. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter, International Studies; offered Winter 2018 · Dev Gupta
  • POSC 348: Strangers, Foreigners and Exiles*

    The course explores the role that strangers play in human life, the challenges that foreigners create for democratic politics, the promises they bring to it, as well as the role of exiles in improving the cultural capacity of societies to live with difference. We will read texts by Arendt, Kafka, Derrida, Sophocles, Said, Joseph Conrad, Tzvetan Todorov, and Julia Kristeva. Special attention will be given to the plight of Roma in Europe, as a typical case of strangers that are still perceived nowadays as a menace to the modern sedentary civilization. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, International Studies; offered Winter 2018 · Mihaela Czobor-Lupp
  • POSC 351: Political Theory of Martin Luther King, Jr.

    This seminar will examine the speeches, writings, and life of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Students will study King as an example of the responsible citizen envisioned by the theory expressed in The Federalist, as a contributor to the discourse of civil religion, and as a figure in recent American social history. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, Intercultural Domestic Studies; offered Winter 2018 · Barbara Allen
  • POSC 366: Urban Political Economy*

    City revenue is increasingly dependent on tourism. Cities manufacture identity and entertainment, whether we think of Las Vegas or Jerusalem, Berlin or Bilbao, the ethnoscapes of Copenhagen or the red light district of Amsterdam. As cities compete in the global economy to become playgrounds for a transnational tourist class, what is the role of urban residents? Who governs? Who benefits? A research paper will be required. Students who have taken POSC 266 remain welcome to take POSC 366.

    6 credit; Social Inquiry, International Studies; offered Winter 2018 · Richard A Keiser

Spring 2018

  • POSC 120: Democracy and Dictatorship

    An introduction to the array of different democratic and authoritarian political institutions in both developing and developed countries. We will also explore key issues in contemporary politics in countries around the world, such as nationalism and independence movements, revolution, regime change, state-making, and social movements. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, International Studies, Writing Requirement; offered Fall 2017, Winter 2018, Spring 2018 · Dev Gupta, Kent Freeze
  • POSC 160: Political Philosophy

    Introduction to ancient and modern political philosophy. We will investigate several fundamentally different approaches to the basic questions of politics--questions concerning the character of political life, the possibilities and limits of politics, justice, and the good society--and the philosophic presuppositions (concerning human nature and human flourishing) that underlie these, and all, political questions. 6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry, Writing Requirement; offered Fall 2017, Spring 2018 · Mihaela Czobor-Lupp, Heather Pangle
  • POSC 170: International Relations and World Politics

    What are the foundational theories and practices of international relations and world politics? This course addresses topics of a geopolitical, commercial and ideological character as they relate to global systems including: great power politics, polycentricity, and international organizations. It also explores the dynamic intersection of world politics with war, terrorism, nuclear weapons, national security, human security, human rights, and the globalization of economic and social development. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, International Studies; offered Winter 2018, Spring 2018 · Tun Myint, Hicham N Bou Nassif
  • POSC 215: Political Communications in Comparative Context

    This five-week course will focus on the major theories of political communication in an election context. Our case studies will be the French and German 2017 elections. We compare the legal and cultural contexts of election news coverage and advertising in these countries and analyze media effects on voter perceptions using political psychology studies based on research in the U.S. and EU.

    3 credit; Quantitative Reasoning Encounter, Social Inquiry, International Studies; offered Spring 2018 · Barbara Allen
  • POSC 219: Poverty and Public Policy in the U.S.

    Deindustrialization, inequality, housing policy, and welfare will be major topics.

    6 credit; Social Inquiry, Intercultural Domestic Studies; offered Spring 2018 · Richard A Keiser
  • POSC 230: Methods of Political Research

    An introduction to research method, research design, and the analysis of political data. The course is intended to introduce students to the fundamentals of scientific inquiry as they are employed in the discipline. The course will consider the philosophy of scientific research generally, the philosophy of social science research, theory building and theory testing, the components of applied (quantitative and qualitative) research across the major sub-fields of political science, and basic methodological tools. Intended for majors only. Prerequisites: Mathematics 115, 215, 245, or AP Statistics (score of 4 or 5) 6 credit; Social Inquiry, Writing Requirement, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter; offered Fall 2017, Winter 2018, Spring 2018 · Bryan R Daves, Kent Freeze
  • POSC 231: American Foreign Policy

    An introduction to the actors and processes of American foreign policymaking and to the substance of American foreign policy. The course aims to provide students with an understanding of how knowledge of the past, the global policy environment, the processes of foreign policymaking, and the specifics of a foreign policy issue come together to help determine modern American foreign policy. The course will review the structure of the international system of states, state power and interests, the historical context of American foreign policy, actors in American foreign affairs, models of foreign policy decision making, and the instruments of foreign policy. Prerequisites: Political Science 122, AP American Government, or AP US History is highly recommended 6 credit; Social Inquiry, International Studies; offered Spring 2018 · Greg Marfleet
  • POSC 235: Game Theory: Politics and Strategy

    In politics, competition is common and cooperation is problematic. Elemental to both are the strategies that individuals, movements, parties and countries choose to achieve their goals, given what others are doing. This course introduces the basic concepts and tools of game theory—which is the formal representation of the strategic relationships of actors—to understand whether, how and when political actors get what they want. Examples from different political contexts will be used to illustrate real life examples of theoretical insights.

    6 credit; Social Inquiry, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter; offered Spring 2018 · Bryan R Daves
  • POSC 242: Political Economy of the Middle East

    What explains the Middle East’s uneven economic development, even though many countries in the region have vast amounts of wealth? What are the social, political, diplomatic and security implications of increasing populations in stagnating economies? This course explores key questions at the intersection of the political and economic systems of the region to understand the origins of the challenges the region faces, the attempts at solutions, and the prospects for the future.

    6 credit; Social Inquiry, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter, International Studies; offered Spring 2018 · Bryan R Daves
  • POSC 251: Modern Political Philosophy: Liberalism and Its Critics

    Liberalism is the dominant political philosophy of our time. Living in a liberal polity, each of us has been shaped by liberalism. But is liberalism the best political order? Do we even know what liberalism is? What are the strongest arguments in its favor, and what are the deepest criticisms we might level against it? In this course we will examine liberalism’s philosophic roots and engage with some of its most forceful advocates and most profound critics. Our readings will include authors such as Locke, Montesquieu, Rousseau, Tocqueville, Mill, and Nietzsche.

    6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry, International Studies; offered Spring 2018 · Heather Pangle
  • POSC 265: Public Policy and Global Capitalism

    This course provides a comprehensive introduction to comparative and international public policy. It examines major theories and approaches to public policy design and implementation in several major areas: international policy economy (including the study of international trade and monetary policy, financial regulation, and comparative welfare policy), global public health and comparative healthcare policy, institutional development (including democratic governance, accountability systems, and judicial reform), and environmental public policy. This course serves as the gateway for the Political Economy Minor.

    6 credit; Social Inquiry, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter, International Studies; offered Spring 2018 · Alfred P Montero
  • POSC 275: Black Radical Political Thought, 1919-1969

    This course examines the history of Black radical political thought in the United States between 1919 and 1969. It also explores internationalist and diasporic linkages that shaped, and were shaped by, the U.S. context. "Black Radicalism" refers to the forms of politics and thought that have challenged, nationally and globally, economic exploitation, social inequality, political marginalization, and private and state-sanctioned antiblackness. The political ideologies and practices we will consider include: Black nationalism, pan-Africanism, socialism and communism, and Black feminisms. The course will also pay special attention to the sociohistorical and political economic contexts that give rise to different forms of Black radicalism.

    6 credit; Social Inquiry, Writing Requirement, Intercultural Domestic Studies; offered Spring 2018 · Charisse E Burden-Stelly
  • POSC 294: Central and Eastern European Politics Program: Perceptions of Otherness in Modern Eastern and Central Europe

    Is nationalism fundamentally flawed in its inclusionary capacity? Can the same power of imagination to bring strangers together, which made nation-building possible, be deployed for inventing post-national forms of solidarity? The course will explore representations of strangers and foreigners in Central and Eastern Europe, throughout the nineteenth and twentieth century, with a special focus on Roma and Jews. The aim will be to understand how these representations will work to legitimize different forms of exclusionary politics. An important part of the course will explore the role that exiled and displaced people can play in reimagining identities on a cosmopolitan level.

    6 credit; Social Inquiry, International Studies; offered Spring 2018 · Mihaela Czobor-Lupp
  • POSC 295: Central and Eastern European Politics Program: Nation-Building in Central and Eastern Europe between Politics and Art

    The state and its cultural politics played a pivotal role in building the Romanian nation. The first part of the course will analyze the difficulties of nation-building in modern Romania, with a special emphasis on the incapacity of Romanian liberalism to prevent the rise of extreme right wing politics. The second part will explore different images of Romanian national identity that art provided both during the communist regime and in the post-1989 decades, also in a comparative perspective with Hungary, Bulgaria, and Serbia. The course will include visits to galleries, architectural sites and neighborhoods in Bucharest and its surroundings.

    6 credit; Social Inquiry, International Studies; offered Spring 2018 · Mihaela Czobor-Lupp
  • POSC 296: Central and Eastern European Politics Program: Challenges to the Nation-State in Eastern and Central Europe: Immigrants and Minorities

    How do democracies react when confronted with massive bodies of immigrants? Do the problems that Eastern and Central European countries face in dealing with immigrants reflect deeper challenges to their capacity of thinking of the nation along inclusionary lines? We will explore the legal and political issues that EU countries and their societies, particularly, in Eastern and Central Europe, face when confronted with a migration crisis. Then we will look at Roma’s history of exploitation and injustice in Eastern and Central Europe. The course will include visits with community groups and NGOs, as well as encounters with minority rights activists.

    6 credit; Social Inquiry, International Studies; offered Spring 2018 · Mihaela Czobor-Lupp
  • POSC 302: Subordinated Politics and Intergroup Relations*

    How do social and political groups interact? How do we understand these interactions in relation to power? This course will introduce the basic approaches and debates in the study of prejudice, racial attitudes, and intergroup relations. We will focus on three main questions. First, how do we understand and study prejudice and racism as they relate to U.S. politics? Second, how do group identities, stereotyping, and other factors help us understand the legitimation of discrimination, group hierarchy, and social domination? Third, what are the political and social challenges associated with reducing prejudice?

    6 credit; Social Inquiry, Intercultural Domestic Studies; offered Spring 2018 · Christina E Farhart
  • POSC 320: Authoritarianism and Democratization in the Middle East*

    This course analyzes theories of authoritarianism and prospects for democratization in the Middle East. The course is divided into three sections: the first covers the main theoretical perspectives explaining the persistence of authoritarian rule in the Middle East. The second is devoted to the events of the Arab Spring, with an emphasis on Egypt, Syria, and Tunisia. Finally, the third section deals with two of the most pressing issues facing the countries of the Arab Spring: 1) the political role of Arab armed forces, 2) the integration of the long-banned Islamist groups into the public sphere as legitimate political parties. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, International Studies; offered Spring 2018 · Hicham N Bou Nassif
  • POSC 325: Corruption, Clientelism, and Political Machines*

    Motivated by the literature on “quality of democracy,” this course delves into theories of accountability, government responsiveness, transparency, and other major aspects of governance. It explores these concepts in democratic and nondemocratic regimes by focusing on corrupt and clientelistic politics in a variety of regions, including Latin America, Europe, sub-Saharan Africa, the Middle East, the post-Soviet countries, and East and Southeast Asia. Topics covered in the course include vote-buying and other forms of electoral fraud, the influence of money in campaigns, kickback schemes and governance, crony capitalism, clientelism and political machines, and varieties of accountability systems and institutional reform.

    6 credit; Social Inquiry, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter, International Studies; offered Spring 2018 · Alfred P Montero
  • POSC 333: Global Social Changes and Sustainability*

    This course is about the relationship between social changes and ecological changes to understand and to be able to advance analytical concepts, research methods, and theories of society-nature interactions. How do livelihoods of individuals and groups change over time and how do the changes affect ecological sustainability? What are the roles of human institutions in ecological sustainability? What are the roles of ecosystem dynamics in institutional sustainability? Students will learn fundamental theories and concepts that explain linkages between social change and environmental changes and gain methods and skills to measure social changes qualitatively and quantitatively. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, Writing Requirement, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter, International Studies; offered Spring 2018 · Tun Myint
  • POSC 338: Politics of Inequality and Poverty*

    The unequal distribution of income and assets is arguably the most important issue in many political systems around the world, and debates over the appropriate role of government in fighting inequality form a primary dimension of political competition. In this course, we will explore the politics surrounding economic inequality around the world. We will discuss how inequality influences political participation in democracies and dictatorships, shapes prospects for democratic transition/consolidation, and affects economic growth and social well-being. We will also examine when and how political institutions can mitigate negative aspects of inequality. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, International Studies; offered Spring 2018 · Kent Freeze
  • POSC 371: Modern Political Philosophy: Liberalism & Its Critics*

    Cross-listed with POSC 251.Liberalism is the dominant political philosophy of our time. Living in a liberal polity, each of us has been shaped by liberalism. But is liberalism the best political order? Do we even know what liberalism is? What are the strongest arguments in its favor, and what are the deepest criticisms we might level against it? In this course we will examine liberalism’s philosophic roots and engage with some of its most forceful advocates and most profound critics. Our readings will include authors such as Locke, Montesquieu, Rousseau, Tocqueville, Mill, and Nietzsche. Research paper required.

    6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry, International Studies, Writing Requirement; offered Spring 2018 · Heather Pangle