Welcome to new faculty members

August 2, 2006
By Tricia Peterson

The Department of Political Science welcomes Devashree Gupta and Carolyn Wong. Both join the faculty fall term 2006.

Carolyn Wong received her Ph.D. from the University of California, Los Angeles, in 1997, after earning a Masters Degree in Technology Policy at M.I.T. She comes to Carleton from Stanford University. Prof. Wong's research and teaching focus primarily on the politics of race, ethnicity and immigration in the United States. Her book Lobbying for Inclusion: Rights Politics and the Making of Immigration Policywas published by Stanford University Press in March 2006. She is currently comparing the paths to political integration of Hmong and Vietnamese refugee communities in the U.S., France, and Australia. She has also carried out research about expatriate voting by citizens of El Salvador living in the United States. Her courses examine racial and ethnic politics from a cross-national comparative perspective, the political economy of immigration and social policy, and the politics of human rights for refugee populations.

Devashree Gupta is completing her Ph.D. at Cornell University. Her main research interests include nationalism, social movements, ethnic conflict, and political extremism. Her dissertation, Militant Flanks and Moderate Centers: The Struggle for Power and Influence in Nationalist Movements, explores the strategies that rival nationalist factions use to acquire more public support and material resources than their competitors in order to emerge as the ideological and strategic leaders of the nationalist community. She has published her work in The Chicago Policy Review and PS: Political Science & Politics, and has two articles slated to appear in forthcoming issues of Comparative European Politics (on nationalist networks in the European Union) and in Comparative Politics (on government responses to social movement challenges). Her courses include international relations, social movements, comparative nationalism, and ethnic conflict.