Courses

Fall 2017

  • SOAN 100: Asian Americans: From Forever Foreigner to the Model Minority

    Are Asian Americans forever foreigners or honorary whites? This class introduces you to the sociological research on Asian Americans. We begin by a brief introduction of U.S. immigration history and sociological theories about assimilation and racial stratification. Paying particular attention to how scholars ask questions and evaluate evidence, we will cover research on racial and ethnic identity, educational stratification, mass media images, interracial marriage, multiracials, transracial adoption, and the viability of an Asian American panethnic identity. The course will examine the similarities and differences among Asian Americans relative to other minority groups when applicable.

    6 credit; Argument and Inquiry Seminar, Writing Requirement, Intercultural Domestic Studies; offered Fall 2017 · Liz Raleigh
    Extended departmental description for SOAN 100

    Syllabus, Fall 2017 - Raleigh

  • SOAN 110: Introduction to Anthropology

    An introduction to cultural and social anthropology which develops the theoretical rationale of the discipline through the integration of ethnographic accounts with an analysis of major trends in historical and contemporary thought. Examples of analytical problems selected for discussion include the concepts of society and culture, value systems, linguistics, economic, social, political and religious institutions, as well as ethnographic method and the ethical position of anthropology. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, International Studies; offered Fall 2017, Winter 2018, Spring 2018 · Jay Levi, Constanza Ocampo-Raeder, Pamela Feldman-Savelsberg
    Extended departmental description for SOAN 110

    Syllabus, Winter 2018 - Ocampo-Raeder

  • SOAN 111: Introduction to Sociology

    An introduction to sociology, including analysis of the sociological perspective, culture, socialization, demography, and social class and caste institutions in modern industrial societies and cultures; stability and change in societies of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Pros and cons of various theoretical strategies will be emphasized. 6 credit; Social Inquiry; offered Fall 2017, Winter 2018, Spring 2018 · Annette M Nierobisz, Wes D Markofski, Liz Raleigh
    Extended departmental description for SOAN 111

    Syllabus, Fall 2017 - Nierobisz

    Syllabus, Spring 2017 - Markofski

  • SOAN 140: Animals & Society

    Other-than-human animals are an overwhelming presence in our collective and individual lives. In this course, we will explore questions regarding the intersection of the lives of human and non-human animals from a sociological perspective. Such questions include: Why do we love some animals to the point of considering them family members, but vilify and even eat others? Are “pets” monsters of dependence created by human oppression, or do pets and people co-exist interdependently? Is human treatment of non-human animals related in significant ways to such enduring social problems as racism, sexism, and violence against vulnerable groups?

    6 credit; Social Inquiry; offered Fall 2017 · Emily A Bowman
    Extended departmental description for SOAN 140

    Syllabus, Fall 2017 - Bowman

  • SOAN 170: Investigating (In)Equality: Comparative Welfare States

    Is health care coverage a right of citizenship, or a commodity purchased in the marketplace?  Where does the responsibility of caring for children and the elderly lie?  Nations around the world answer these and similar policy questions quite differently, resulting in wide-ranging consequences. Sociologists use the phrase “welfare state” to refer to the role the government plays in protecting and promoting citizens’ well being. By comparing the U.S. welfare state with that of other countries, we will examine the socio-cultural mechanisms that shape equality/inequality and investigate the impact of the welfare state on both social institutions and people’s life chances.

    6 credit; Social Inquiry, Intercultural Domestic Studies; offered Fall 2017 · Emily A Bowman
    Extended departmental description for SOAN 170

    Syllabus, Fall 2017 - Bowman

  • SOAN 203: Anthropology of Good Intentions

    Is the environmental movement making progress? Do responsible products actually help local populations? Is international AID alleviating poverty and fostering development? Today there are thousands of programs with sustainable development goals yet their effectiveness is often contested at the local level. This course explores the impacts of sustainable development, conservation, and AID programs to look beyond the good intentions of those that implement them. In doing so we hope to uncover common pitfalls behind good intentions and the need for sound social analysis that recognizes, examines, and evaluates the role of cultural complexity found in populations targeted by these programs.

    Prerequisites: The department strongly recommends that Sociology/Anthropology 110 or 111 be taken prior to enrolling in courses numbered 200 or above 6 credit; Social Inquiry, International Studies; offered Fall 2017 · Constanza Ocampo-Raeder
    Extended departmental description for SOAN 203

    Syllabus, Fall 2017 - Ocampo-Raeder

  • SOAN 322: Buddhist Studies India Program: Contemporary Buddhist Culture

    This course introduces students to the complexity and plurality of Buddhist traditions that have flourished in diverse societies and cultures in the modern era. This course enables students to sympathetically understand and critically investigate various Buddhist traditions and their historically and culturally specific configurations of philosophical beliefs, cultural values, everyday practices, social institutions, and personal experiences. Focusing on Buddhist traditions of South and Southeast Asia, Japan, and Tibet, we explore topics including syncretism and popular religion, monasticism, gender, economic development, social movements, political violence, and religious revival. Students expand their research skills in anthropology through field assignments in Bodh Gaya.

    Prerequisites: Acceptance into the Carleton-Antioch Program required 7-8 credit; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; offered Fall 2017 · Arthur P McKeown
  • SOAN 325: Sociology of Adoption and Assisted Reproduction

    Where do babies come from? Whereas once the answer was relatively straight forward, the growth of assisted reproductive technologies (ART) and adoption has changed the field of potential answers. Nowadays babies can come from birthmothers, egg donors, and surrogates. In this course we will examine the meaning and making of families across these different types of formations and contextualize the popularity of ART relative to the decrease in adoption. We will take a sociological approach to analyzing these issues, paying particular attention to questions surrounding women's rights, baby "markets," and the racialization of children placed for adoption in the U.S. Prerequisites: Prior Sociology/Anthropology course or instructor permission 6 credit; Social Inquiry, Intercultural Domestic Studies; offered Fall 2017 · Liz Raleigh
    Extended departmental description for SOAN 325

    Syllabus, Fall 2017 - Raleigh

  • SOAN 330: Sociological Thought and Theory

    Many thinkers have contributed to the development of sociology as an intellectual discipline and mode of social inquiry; however, few have had the influence of Emile Durkheim, Karl Marx, and Max Weber. This course focuses on influential texts and ideas generated by these and other theorists from sociology’s “classical era,” how these texts and ideas are put to use by contemporary sociologists, and on more recent theoretical developments and critical perspectives that have influenced the field. 

    Prerequisites: The department strongly recommends that Sociology/Anthropology 110 or 111 be taken prior to enrolling in courses numbered 200 or above 6 credit; Social Inquiry, Writing Requirement; offered Fall 2017 · Wes D Markofski
    Extended departmental description for SOAN 330

    Syllabus, Fall 2017 - Markofski

  • SOAN 333: Environmental Anthropology

    Can we learn to use resources sustainably? Are there people in the world that know how to manage their environment appropriately? What are the causes behind environmental degradation? These questions are commonly asked in public and academic forums but what discussions often overlook is the fact that these are fundamentally social questions and thus social analysis is needed to understand them fully. This course aims at exploring key issues of human/nature interactions by using anthropological critiques and frameworks of analysis to show how culture is a critical variable to understanding these interactions in all their complexity. Prerequisites: The department strongly recommends that Sociology/Anthropology 110 or 111 be taken prior to enrolling in courses numbered 200 or above 6 credit; Social Inquiry, Writing Requirement, International Studies; offered Fall 2017 · Constanza Ocampo-Raeder
    Extended departmental description for SOAN 333

    Syllabus, Fall 2017 - Ocampo-Raeder

  • SOAN 396: Advanced Sociological and Anthropological Writing

    This course explores different genres of writing and different audiences for writing in the social sciences, focusing particular attention on scholarly articles published in professional journals in sociology and anthropology. To that end, students both analyze sociological and anthropological articles regarding commonalities and differences in academic writing in our two sister disciplines. Students work on their own academic writing process (with the help of peer-review and instructor feedback). The writing itself is broken down into component elements on which students practice and revise their work. S/Cr/NC

    Prerequisites: Completion of Sociology/Anthropology 240 or submission of a topic statement in the preceding spring term and submission of a comps thesis proposal on the first day of fall term. Senior Sociology/Anthropology major or instructor permission 6 credit; S/CR/NC; Social Inquiry, Writing Requirement; offered Fall 2017 · Pamela Feldman-Savelsberg
    Extended departmental description for SOAN 396

    Syllabus, Fall 2017 - Feldman-Savelsberg

  • SOAN 400: Integrative Exercise

    Senior sociology/anthropology majors fulfill the integrative exercise by writing a senior thesis on a topic approved by the department. Students must enroll in six credits to write the thesis, spread as the student likes over Fall, Winter, and Spring terms. The process begins with the submission of a topic statement in the preceding spring term and concludes with a public presentation in spring of the senior year. Please consult the Sociology and Anthropology website for a full description. 1-6 credit; S/NC; offered Fall 2017, Winter 2018, Spring 2018 · Pamela Feldman-Savelsberg, Jay Levi, Annette M Nierobisz, Wes D Markofski, Liz Raleigh, Constanza Ocampo-Raeder

Winter 2018

  • SOAN 110: Introduction to Anthropology

    An introduction to cultural and social anthropology which develops the theoretical rationale of the discipline through the integration of ethnographic accounts with an analysis of major trends in historical and contemporary thought. Examples of analytical problems selected for discussion include the concepts of society and culture, value systems, linguistics, economic, social, political and religious institutions, as well as ethnographic method and the ethical position of anthropology. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, International Studies; offered Fall 2017, Winter 2018, Spring 2018 · Jay Levi, Constanza Ocampo-Raeder, Pamela Feldman-Savelsberg
    Extended departmental description for SOAN 110

    Syllabus, Winter 2018 - Ocampo-Raeder

  • SOAN 111: Introduction to Sociology

    An introduction to sociology, including analysis of the sociological perspective, culture, socialization, demography, and social class and caste institutions in modern industrial societies and cultures; stability and change in societies of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Pros and cons of various theoretical strategies will be emphasized. 6 credit; Social Inquiry; offered Fall 2017, Winter 2018, Spring 2018 · Annette M Nierobisz, Wes D Markofski, Liz Raleigh
    Extended departmental description for SOAN 111

    Syllabus, Fall 2017 - Nierobisz

    Syllabus, Spring 2017 - Markofski

  • SOAN 114: Modern Families: An Introduction to the Sociology of the Family

    What makes a family? How has the conception of kinship and the 'normal' family changed over the generations? In this introductory class, we examine these questions, drawing on a variety of course materials ranging from classic works in sociology to contemporary blogs on family life. The class focuses on diversity in family life, paying particular attention to the intersection between the family, race and ethnicity, and social class. We'll examine these issues at the micro and macro level, incorporating texts that focus on individuals' stories as well as demographics of the family. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter, Intercultural Domestic Studies; offered Winter 2018 · Liz Raleigh
    Extended departmental description for SOAN 114

    Syllabus, Winter 2017 - Raleigh

  • SOAN 151: Global Minnesota: An Anthropology of Our State

    The state of Minnesota, like the rest of the U.S., has been formed by the migration and settlement of peoples from across the world at different historical moments. Though often hidden from public view, the state is home to peoples with diverse cultural and religious practices, making Minnesota a microcosm of the global. This course will provide an anthropology of Minnesota by examining the different migration histories and experiences of Minnesota’s varied population groups. Through a study of the making of Minnesota and its population groups, the course will examine borders and movement from a global and historical perspective, as well as explore the presence of different cultural and religious groups in Minnesota and the social relations they form. This course will help students see Minnesota and the people that call it home in new ways.

    6 credit; Social Inquiry, Writing Requirement, Intercultural Domestic Studies; offered Winter 2018 · Ahmed S Ibrahim
    Extended departmental description for SOAN 151

    Syllabus, Winter 2018 - Ibrahim

  • SOAN 228: Public Sociology of Religion

    From the discipline’s earliest days, sociologists have considered religion a fascinating and perplexing object of study. Classical sociologists devoted enormous attention to the topic of religion, famously linking it to the development of capitalism and Western modernity (Weber), to social solidarity and symbolic classification systems (Durkheim), to political passivity and social conservatism (Marx), and to the varying forms of social, economic, and political life found in the world’s great civilizations.  This course focuses on special topics in the contemporary sociology of religion, with a particular emphasis on religion in public and political life in American and global civil society.

    Prerequisites: The department strongly recommends that Sociology/Anthropology 110 or 111 be taken prior to enrolling in courses number 200 or above 6 credit; Social Inquiry, International Studies; offered Winter 2018 · Wes D Markofski
    Extended departmental description for SOAN 228

    Syllabus, Winter 2017 - Markofski

  • SOAN 233: Anthropology of Food

    Food is the way to a person's heart but perhaps even more interesting, the window into a society's soul. Simply speaking understating a society's foodways is the best way to comprehend the complexity between people, culture and nature. This course explores how anthropologists use food to understand different aspects of human behavior, from food procurement and consumption practices to the politics of nutrition and diets. In doing so we hope to elucidate how food is more than mere sustenance and that often the act of eating is a manifestation of power, resistance, identity, and community. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, International Studies; offered Winter 2018 · Constanza Ocampo-Raeder
    Extended departmental description for SOAN 233

    Syllabus, Winter 2018 - Ocampo-Raeder

  • SOAN 262: Anthropology of Health and Illness

    An ethnographic approach to beliefs and practices regarding health and illness in numerous societies worldwide. This course examines patients, practitioners, and the social networks and contexts through which therapies are managed to better understand medical systems as well as the significance of the anthropological study of misfortune. Specific topics include the symbolism of models of illness, the ritual management of misfortune and of life crisis events, the political economy of health, therapy management, medical pluralism, and cross-cultural medical ethics. Prerequisites: The department strongly recommends that Sociology/Anthropology 110 or 111 be taken prior to enrolling in courses numbered 200 or above 6 credit; Social Inquiry, Writing Requirement, International Studies; offered Winter 2018 · Pamela Feldman-Savelsberg
    Extended departmental description for SOAN 262

    Syllabus, Winter 2018 - Feldman-Savelsberg

  • SOAN 314: Contemporary Issues in Critical Criminology

    This course examines contemporary criminological issues from a critical, sociological perspective. Our focus is on the United States with topics under examination including white collar crime, racial disparities in the criminal justice system, mass incarceration and other transformations in punishment, prisoner reentry, and the risk of recidivism. In addition to understanding both classic and contemporary sociological research and theory, we will seek answers to questions like: What is crime? Who is considered a criminal? What social changes drove the United States to get "tough" on crime?  What effects does incarceration have on prisoners, their families, their neighborhoods and communities? What happens when prisoners return to society? 

    Prerequisites: The department strongly recommends that Sociology/Anthropology 110 or 111 be taken prior to enrolling in courses numbered 200 or above 6 credit; Social Inquiry, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter, Intercultural Domestic Studies, Writing Requirement; offered Winter 2018 · Annette M Nierobisz
    Extended departmental description for SOAN 314

    Syllabus, Winter 2018 - Nierobisz

  • SOAN 331: Anthropological Thought and Theory

    A systematic introduction to the theoretical foundations of social and cultural anthropology with special emphasis given to twentieth century British, French and American schools. The course deals with such seminal figures as Morgan, Boas, Malinowski, Radcliffe-Brown, Levi-Straus, Harris, Sahlins, Bourdieu, Geertz, and Appadurai. The reading strikes a balance between ethnographic accounts and theoretical statements. Prerequisites: Sociology/Anthropology 110 or 111 or instructor permission 6 credit; Social Inquiry, International Studies, Writing Requirement; offered Winter 2018 · Pamela Feldman-Savelsberg
    Extended departmental description for SOAN 331

    Syllabus, Winter 2018 - Feldman-Savelsberg

  • SOAN 400: Integrative Exercise

    Senior sociology/anthropology majors fulfill the integrative exercise by writing a senior thesis on a topic approved by the department. Students must enroll in six credits to write the thesis, spread as the student likes over Fall, Winter, and Spring terms. The process begins with the submission of a topic statement in the preceding spring term and concludes with a public presentation in spring of the senior year. Please consult the Sociology and Anthropology website for a full description. 1-6 credit; S/NC; offered Fall 2017, Winter 2018, Spring 2018 · Pamela Feldman-Savelsberg, Jay Levi, Annette M Nierobisz, Wes D Markofski, Liz Raleigh, Constanza Ocampo-Raeder

Spring 2018

  • SOAN 110: Introduction to Anthropology

    An introduction to cultural and social anthropology which develops the theoretical rationale of the discipline through the integration of ethnographic accounts with an analysis of major trends in historical and contemporary thought. Examples of analytical problems selected for discussion include the concepts of society and culture, value systems, linguistics, economic, social, political and religious institutions, as well as ethnographic method and the ethical position of anthropology. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, International Studies; offered Fall 2017, Winter 2018, Spring 2018 · Jay Levi, Constanza Ocampo-Raeder, Pamela Feldman-Savelsberg
    Extended departmental description for SOAN 110

    Syllabus, Winter 2018 - Ocampo-Raeder

  • SOAN 111: Introduction to Sociology

    An introduction to sociology, including analysis of the sociological perspective, culture, socialization, demography, and social class and caste institutions in modern industrial societies and cultures; stability and change in societies of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Pros and cons of various theoretical strategies will be emphasized. 6 credit; Social Inquiry; offered Fall 2017, Winter 2018, Spring 2018 · Annette M Nierobisz, Wes D Markofski, Liz Raleigh
    Extended departmental description for SOAN 111

    Syllabus, Fall 2017 - Nierobisz

    Syllabus, Spring 2017 - Markofski

  • SOAN 239: Social Statistics

    What does it for something to be statistically significant? This course will ask and answer this question by teaching social science students how to interpret data. This elementary statistics course covers descriptive and inferential statistics up to regression. Whenever possible, we will 'flip' the classroom -- using class time for activities and problem sets, and using out of class time for online lectures to introduce new material. We will focus on calculating and applying social statistics, rather than statistical theory. No prior knowledge of statistics is required. 6 credit; Formal or Statistical Reasoning, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter; offered Spring 2018 · Liz Raleigh
    Extended departmental description for SOAN 239

    Syllabus, Spring 2017 - Raleigh

  • SOAN 240: Methods of Social Research

    The course is concerned with social scientific inquiry and explanation, particularly with reference to sociology and anthropology. Topics covered include research design, data collection, and analysis of data. Both quantitative and qualitative methods are considered. Student will demonstrate their knowledge by developing a research proposal that is implementable. Prerequisites: Sociology/Anthropology 110 or 111; Sociology/Anthropology 239 or Mathematics 115 or 215 6 credit; Social Inquiry, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter, Writing Requirement; offered Spring 2018 · Annette M Nierobisz
    Extended departmental description for SOAN 240

    Syllabus, Winter 2016 - Nierobisz

  • SOAN 250: Ethnography of Latin America

    This course explores the historical development and contemporary experience of selected peoples and cultures of Latin America. We will examine the historical and structural processes that have shaped contact among indigenous, European, and African peoples in Latin America during Conquest and the colonial period, under conditions of global economic expansion and state formation, and in present day urban centers and extractive "frontiers." Special attention will be given to local-level transformations and resistance as well as issues of migration and gender construction. Prerequisites: The department strongly recommends that Sociology/Anthropology 110 or 111 be taken prior to enrolling in courses numbered 200 or above 6 credit; Social Inquiry, International Studies; offered Spring 2018 · Constanza Ocampo-Raeder
    Extended departmental description for SOAN 250

    Syllabus, Spring 2007

  • SOAN 263: Terrorism

    In recent years, Muslim communities in Western countries have come to be seen as national security threats. In tandem, efforts to stem the flow of Muslim migrants into the U.S. and Europe, under the logic of combating terrorism, has shaped world events, from Trump’s election to Brexit. Through a reading of works in political ethnography and the anthropology of religion, this course will examine the presuppositions that inform discourses on Muslim migration as a threat, as well as the “countering violent extremism” (CVE) programs directed at Muslim communities here in the U.S. We will look at the assumption of an affinity between religion, particularly Islam, and violence that undergird CVE programs; the tensions such programs expose between a liberal secular democracy’s commitment to religious freedom and its aspiration to govern and reform religious traditions; and the culture of surveillance and the marginalization of Muslim communities these programs spawn.

    Prerequisites: Previous courses in anthropology or religion would offer helpful background, but are not required. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, Writing Requirement, Intercultural Domestic Studies; offered Spring 2018 · Ahmed S Ibrahim
  • SOAN 278: Urban Ethnography and the American Experience

    American sociology has a rich tradition of focusing the ethnographic eye on the American experience. We will take advantage of this tradition to encounter urban America through the ethnographic lens, expanding our social vision and investigating the nature of race, place, meaning, interaction, and inequality in the U.S. While doing so, we will also explore the unique benefits, challenges, and underlying assumptions of ethnographic research as a distinctive mode of acquiring and communicating social knowledge. As such, this course offers both an immersion in the American experience and an inquiry into the craft of ethnographic writing and research.

    Prerequisites: The department strongly recommends that 110 or 111 be taken prior to enrolling in courses numbered 200 or above 6 credit; Social Inquiry, Intercultural Domestic Studies; offered Spring 2018 · Wes D Markofski
  • SOAN 285: The Ethics of Civic Engagement

    In this course, students will discuss the ethical questions that arise when they engage with others in research, service, organizing, or policy work. Students will read and talk about the meanings and forms of civic engagement and use these readings to reflect upon their own research or service projects, or to reflect upon the college's role in Haiti or Faribault, two areas where college members are actively engaged. Gaining insights from sociological and practice based readings, we will examine different perspectives on the ways that power and privilege relate to civic engagement. 3 credit; S/CR/NC; Social Inquiry; offered Spring 2018
    Extended departmental description for SOAN 285

    Syllabus, Spring 2014

  • SOAN 350: Diversity and Democracy in America

    The classical American pragmatist tradition of Jane Addams and John Dewey presents us with a vision of ethical democracy that accounts for the vast ethnic, religious, and cultural diversity of the United States. But what are we to make of this vision in practice? Can the cultivation of diverse human experiences and relationships among citizens lead to more robust and ethical democratic institutions? Or, as the culture war thesis implies, are our differences so great that American democracy is doomed to a future of intractable conflict? We will explore these questions drawing on influential studies of democratic theory and practice.

    Prerequisites: The department strongly recommends that Sociology/Anthropology 110 or 111 be taken prior to enrolling in courses number 200 or above 6 credit; Social Inquiry, Intercultural Domestic Studies; offered Spring 2018 · Wes D Markofski
    Extended departmental description for SOAN 350

    Syllabus, Spring 2017 - Markofski

  • SOAN 395: Ethnography of Reproduction

    This seminar explores the meanings of reproductive beliefs and practices in comparative perspective. Using ethnographies, it explores the relation between human and social reproduction. It focuses on (but is not limited to) ethnographic examples from the United States/Canada and from sub-Saharan Africa (societies with relatively low fertility and high utilization of technology and societies with mostly high fertility and low utilization of technology). Topics examined include fertility and birth, fertility rites, new reproductive technologies, abortion, population control, infertility, child survival and child loss. Prerequisites: Sociology/Anthropology 110 or 111 and 226, 260 or 262; or instructor permission 6 credit; Social Inquiry, Writing Requirement, International Studies; offered Spring 2018 · Pamela Feldman-Savelsberg
    Extended departmental description for SOAN 395

    Syllabus, Spring 2016

     Syllabus, Spring 2013

  • SOAN 400: Integrative Exercise

    Senior sociology/anthropology majors fulfill the integrative exercise by writing a senior thesis on a topic approved by the department. Students must enroll in six credits to write the thesis, spread as the student likes over Fall, Winter, and Spring terms. The process begins with the submission of a topic statement in the preceding spring term and concludes with a public presentation in spring of the senior year. Please consult the Sociology and Anthropology website for a full description. 1-6 credit; S/NC; offered Fall 2017, Winter 2018, Spring 2018 · Pamela Feldman-Savelsberg, Jay Levi, Annette M Nierobisz, Wes D Markofski, Liz Raleigh, Constanza Ocampo-Raeder