Courses

The Arts Apprenticeship in Cameroon program consists of four courses (4 semester credits each) for a total of 16 semester credits.

Courses are designed in modular fashion, allowing flexibility in teaching material according to the travel itinerary, availability of guest lecturers, and the scheduling of local cultural events and academic conferences.

Courses

  • AFAM 320: Traditional and Modern Perspectives on Cameroonian Cultures
    This course is designed to provide students with a robust theoretical and practical grounding in anthropological fieldwork and participant observation research techniques, and a broad understanding of the multifaceted nature of historical and contemporary Cameroonian cultures. Extensive primary research opportunities, readings, and written assignments are paired with lectures, seminars, and field trips to museums, cultural centers, heritage sites, and selected cities, towns, and villages.
  • ARTS 216: Aesthetic Traditions of Cameroon
    This course surveys the vast array of traditional and contemporary art and artisanal forms and media of Cameroon. Disciplines covered may include music, dance, theater, puppetry, wood carving, painting, pottery, textiles, jewelry making, metallurgy, photography, radio, television, journalism, film, and architecture. Students learn through lectures, seminars, and class discussions, combined with demonstrations and hands-on workshops at the workplaces of local artists and artisans and attendance at related cultural sites and events. Students choose one secondary arts discipline and present a minor work in and about the chosen idiom.
  • ARTS 310: Arts Apprenticeship/Independent Project
    This course consists of two interrelated streams: the apprenticeship and the independent project. Students study and work with an established professional artist-mentor in their chosen visual or performing arts discipline. Through observation of, interaction with, and participation in the life of local artists, the apprenticeship fosters the development of one-on-one relationships between students and artists across cultural and linguistic barriers. Students create and present culminating artistic projects under the guidance of the artist-mentor and the supervision of the Program Director. The independent project is accompanied by a final paper.

        One of the following French language courses:

  • FREN 107: Elementary French
    This course introduces the basic structures of the French language and everyday vocabulary in the context of common cultural situations. Students are exposed to all four skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing), with practical emphasis on oral skills. Elements introduced in classroom instruction are further explored through direct practice in authentic language environments on program sites, and individual practice and study. Students will be engaged with local language instructors and their peers in dialogues and role-playing of authentic situations, and complete basic written homework assignments in preparation for oral and written classroom activities.

  • FREN 108: Intermediate French
    Building on the material covered in Elementary French, this course introduces complex sentence structures and additional vocabulary and verb tenses. The focus of the course is on all four skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing), with an emphasis on oral skills. Elements introduced in classroom instruction are further explored through direct practice in authentic language environments on program sites, and individual practice and study. Students will be engaged with local language instructors and their peers in dialogues and role-playing of authentic situations, and complete basic written homework assignments including the reading of short literary and cultural texts.
  • FREN 391: Advanced French Independent Study
    Building on the material covered in Elementary French, this course introduces complex sentence structures and additional vocabulary and verb tenses. The focus of the course is on all four skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing), with an emphasis on oral skills. Elements introduced in classroom instruction are further explored through direct practice in authentic language environments on program sites, and individual practice and study. Students will be engaged with local language instructors and their peers in dialogues and role-playing of authentic situations, and complete basic written homework assignments including the reading of short literary and cultural texts. 

For course syllabi, contact Carleton Global Engagement at global@carleton.edu.