Courses

The Globalization and Sustainable Development in Cameroon program consists of four courses (4 semester credits each) for a total of 16 semester credits.

Courses

  • ENTS 286: Theoretical and Practical Approaches to Globalization and Development
    This course provides students with foundational knowledge of globalization and development issues while surveying a variety of local approaches to sustainable development as responses to the effects of globalization in Cameroon. Through lectures, seminars, and site visits, students will gain an understanding of the historical foundations of contemporary approaches to development, the nature and breadth of sustainable development, and the controversies surrounding development, including the universality of human rights, ethnocentrism, neocolonialism, corruption, and economic dependence.
  • ENTS 391: NGO Internship/Independent Project
    This course consists of two interrelated streams: the internship and the independent project. During the internship, students study and work with an established NGO, offering practical hands-on experience in service-learning while fostering the development of one-on-one relationships with local activists across cultural and linguistic barriers. Students document and critically analyze their involvement in a pre-existing local sustainable development initiative and/or creative input into the emergence of a new initiative under the guidance of the NGO staff mentor and the supervision of the Program Director. The independent project is accompanied by a final paper.
  • AFAM 320: Traditional and Modern Perspectives on Cameroonian Cultures
    This course is designed to provide students with a robust theoretical and practical grounding in anthropological fieldwork and participant observation research techniques, and a broad understanding of the multifaceted nature of historical and contemporary Cameroonian cultures. Extensive primary research opportunities, readings, and written assignments are paired with lectures, seminars, and field trips to museums, cultural centers, heritage sites, and selected cities, towns, and villages.

    One of the following French language courses:

  • FREN 107: Elementary French
    This course introduces the basic structures of the French language and everyday vocabulary in the context of common cultural situations. Students are exposed to all four skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing), with practical emphasis on oral skills. Elements introduced in classroom instruction are further explored through direct practice in authentic language environments on program sites, and individual practice and study. Students will be engaged with local language instructors and their peers in dialogues and role-playing of authentic situations, and complete basic written homework assignments in preparation for oral and written classroom activities.

  • FREN 108: Intermediate French
    Building on the material covered in Elementary French, this course introduces complex sentence structures and additional vocabulary and verb tenses. The focus of the course is on all four skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing), with an emphasis on oral skills. Elements introduced in classroom instruction are further explored through direct practice in authentic language environments on program sites, and individual practice and study. Students will be engaged with local language instructors and their peers in dialogues and role-playing of authentic situations, and complete basic written homework assignments including the reading of short literary and cultural texts.
  • FREN 391: Advanced French Independent Study
    Building on the material covered in Elementary French, this course introduces complex sentence structures and additional vocabulary and verb tenses. The focus of the course is on all four skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing), with an emphasis on oral skills. Elements introduced in classroom instruction are further explored through direct practice in authentic language environments on program sites, and individual practice and study. Students will be engaged with local language instructors and their peers in dialogues and role-playing of authentic situations, and complete basic written homework assignments including the reading of short literary and cultural texts.

For course syllabi, contact Carleton Global Engagement at global@carleton.edu.