Humanities Events

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November 2015

Friday, November 6th
Saturday, November 7th
Sunday, November 8th

Archive

May 2015

Thursday, May 21st
Wednesday, May 13th

April 2015

Thursday, April 30th
  • Poem in Your Pocket Day
    • To celebrate Poem in Your Pocket Day, the Humanities Center is asking members of the Carleton community to submit their favorite poems.
Monday, April 20th
Thursday, April 16th
Monday, April 13th
  • Northfield Reads: Enrique's Journey
    • Northfield Reads is a community initiative that brings people of all ages and backgrounds to talk about a particular issue.
    • 7:00 pm, St. Dominic's Church
Sunday, April 12th
Saturday, April 11th
Thursday, April 9th

February 2015

Monday, February 23rd
Wednesday, February 18th
Tuesday, February 10th
Tuesday, February 3rd

January 2015

Wednesday, January 21st
Tuesday, January 20th
  • LTC Lunch
    • Faculty-Student Research Collaborations: New Methods and Models in the Humanities and Social Sciences
    • 11:45 am, WCC 236; Larson Family Meeting Room

November 2014

Sunday, November 9th
Saturday, November 8th
Monday, November 3rd
Sunday, November 2nd
Saturday, November 1st

October 2014

Friday, October 31st
Thursday, October 30th
Tuesday, October 28th
Monday, October 27th
Friday, October 24th
Thursday, October 23rd
Tuesday, October 21st
Friday, October 17th
  • Miguel Brieva: Artist's Talk
    • Miguel Brieva will deliver a public lecture on Oct. 17. The talk will be in Spanish, but English translations will be provided.
    • 5:00 pm, Gould Library Athenaeum
Thursday, October 16th
Wednesday, October 15th
Tuesday, October 14th
Monday, October 13th
  • Always Lost: A Meditation on War
    • Exhibition opening event featuring a reading by author Jay Moad. The exhibition runs from October 13 through 24.
    • 7:30 pm, Weitz 148
Sunday, October 12th
  • Northfield Reads (about the Constitution)
    • Northfield Human Rights Commission, Public Library, & Carleton Humanities Ctr host a reading group and discussion on First Amendment Rights.
    • 3:00 pm, Northfield Public Library, meeting room
Thursday, October 9th
Wednesday, October 8th
Monday, October 6th
Thursday, October 2nd
  • Guest Lecture: Annegret Fauser (UNC Chapel Hill)
    • Dr. Fauser presents "Americana, War, & Globalization: Seventy Years of Aaron Copland's Appalachian Spring."
    • 12:00 pm, Music Hall, Room 103
  • Barry Lopez public talk
    • "The Writer and Social Responsibility," a public talk by the Angus C. Wurtele Distinguished Visitor and author Barry Lopez.
    • 7:30 pm, Boliou 104

September 2014

Monday, September 29th
Monday, September 15th

June 2014

Sunday, June 1st

May 2014

Saturday, May 31st
Sunday, May 25th
  • Spring Dance Concert
    • Students from dance classes and Semaphore Repertory Dance Company present a spring concert.
    • 2:00 pm, Weitz Theater
Friday, May 23rd
  • Spring Dance Concert
    • Students in dance classes and Semaphore Repertory Dance Company present a spring concert
    • 7:30 pm, Weitz Theater
Thursday, May 22nd
Wednesday, May 21st
  • Reading by D. J. Waldie
    • Waldie will read from his first book, Holy Land: A Suburban Memoir, on life in the 1950s in Lakewood, California's largest planned suburb.
    • 4:30 pm, The Athenaeum, Gould Library
Sunday, May 18th
  • Northfield Reads: Veterans' Voices
    • Community reading project featuring literature written by veterans, about veterans' experiences.
    • 4:00 pm, Weitz Center 236, Larson Meeting Room
Saturday, May 17th
Wednesday, May 14th
Tuesday, May 13th
Monday, May 12th
Saturday, May 10th
Friday, May 9th
Thursday, May 8th
Tuesday, May 6th
Monday, May 5th
Sunday, May 4th
  • Rapture/Rupture: James D. Butler Upper Mississippi View ends
    • Butler's painting "Power Plant/St. Paul" complements the Petrochemical America exhibition focusing on the lower Mississippi "Cancer Alley."
    • Perlman Teaching Museum
  • Petrochemical America: Project Room ends
    • Haunting photographs of "Chemical Alley" on the lower Mississippi by photographer Richard Misrach and "throughlines" by designer Kate Orff.
    • Perlman Teaching Museum, Braucher and Kaemmer Family Galleries
Saturday, May 3rd
Friday, May 2nd
Thursday, May 1st

April 2014

Saturday, April 26th
  • Foro Latinoamericano 2014:
    • The Politics of Memory & Forgetting in Latin America
    • 8:00 am, Gould Library Athenaeum
  • Foro Latinoamericano 2014
    • 9:30am Speaker Michael Lazzara 10:30am Speaker Katherine Hilte 11:30am Roundtable Discussion
    • 9:00 am, Gould Library Athenaeum
Friday, April 25th
  • Foro Latinoamericano 2014
    • Welcome Film Presentation: "The Tiniest :lace" Colloquium: Director Tatiana Huezo Sánchez
    • 5:00 pm, Weitz Cinema
Thursday, April 24th
Wednesday, April 23rd
Tuesday, April 22nd
Monday, April 21st
Saturday, April 19th
Thursday, April 17th
  • Ethnicity, Inc.
    • John Comaroff, Professor of African and African-American Studies and Anthropology at Harvard University.
    • 4:00 pm, Olin 141
Wednesday, April 16th
Tuesday, April 15th
Monday, April 14th
Friday, April 11th
Wednesday, April 9th
Tuesday, April 8th
Monday, April 7th
Friday, April 4th
  • Rapture/Rupture: James D. Butler Upper Mississippi View begins (through May 4)
    • Butler's painting "Power Plant/St. Paul" complements the Petrochemical America exhibition focusing on the lower Mississippi "Cancer Alley."
    • Perlman Teaching Museum
  • Petrochemical America: Project Room begins (through May 4)
    • Haunting photographs of "Chemical Alley" on the lower Mississippi by photographer Richard Misrach and "throughlines" by designer Kate Orff.
    • Perlman Teaching Museum, Braucher and Kaemmer Family Galleries
Thursday, April 3rd
Wednesday, April 2nd

March 2014

Wednesday, March 12th
  • Lifeloggers: Chronicling the Everyday ends
    • Artists seek to better understand the nature of existence and to reveal the banalities and complexities of quotidian life.
    • Perlman Teaching Museum
Friday, March 7th
  • Ellen Heck, printmaker
    • Ellen Heck, printmaker in the San Francisco area will speak about her work
    • 4:00 pm, Boliou 161
Monday, March 3rd
Saturday, March 1st

February 2014

Friday, February 28th
Thursday, February 27th
Tuesday, February 25th
Monday, February 24th
  • Immigration 101 Forum
    • Immigration 101: Minnesota's new immigration laws and what they mean for Northfield students, families and employers.
    • 7:00 pm, Carleton College Weitz Cinema and Reception Area
Sunday, February 23rd
Saturday, February 22nd
Friday, February 21st
Thursday, February 20th
Tuesday, February 18th
Thursday, February 13th
Tuesday, February 11th
Thursday, February 6th
Wednesday, February 5th
Tuesday, February 4th

January 2014

Thursday, January 30th
Wednesday, January 29th
  • Marathon Reading of Tristram Shandy
    • Marathon Reading of Laurence Sterne's novel, Tristram Shandy, January 29 and 30, 2014 for approximately 24 hours.
    • 12:50 pm, Sayles Balcony North
Monday, January 27th
Thursday, January 23rd
Tuesday, January 21st
Friday, January 17th
Thursday, January 16th
Tuesday, January 14th
  • Schuster Lecture by Debora Shuger
    • Debora Shuger, Professor of English, UCLA, will speak on "Censorship and Cultural Sensibility."
    • 4:00 pm, The Athenaeum, Gould Library
Monday, January 13th

December 2013

Tuesday, December 10th
  • Digital Humanities Workshop
    • Essential Instruments for a Humanist's Digital Tool Kit: Exploring New Web Publishing, App-designing & Mapping Software
    • 1:00 pm, Weitz Center, Room tba

November 2013

Thursday, November 21st
  • Single Species Translations ends
    • Jessica Rath (artist/breeder) and Laura Cooper (artist/forager) expand their artistic practices through intense focus on a single species.
    • Perlman Teaching Museum
Thursday, November 14th
Tuesday, November 12th
  • Close Looks: Books and Films...
    • Close Looks: Books and Films from "Directed: The Intersection between Book, Film and Visual Narrative"
    • 4:00 pm, Gould Library Athenaeum
Monday, November 11th
Sunday, November 10th
Monday, November 4th

October 2013

Wednesday, October 30th
Saturday, October 26th
Friday, October 25th
Thursday, October 24th
Tuesday, October 22nd
Thursday, October 17th
Tuesday, October 15th
Thursday, October 10th
Tuesday, October 8th
  • Screening of Spielberg's "Lincoln"
    • A free screening of Steven Spielberg's Lincoln, as part of the "How Hollywood Handles History" mini-conference
    • 6:45 pm, Weitz Center Cinema
Thursday, October 3rd
  • Martha Nussbaum Faculty Seminar
    • Martha Nussbaum, U. Chicago, will lead a faculty seminar on her new book, Political Emotions: Why Love Matters for Justice.
    • 7:30 pm, AGH Meeting Room
Tuesday, October 1st

September 2013

Monday, September 30th
Sunday, September 29th
  • Theatre performance: MARX IN SOHO
    • The Department of Economics hosts a one-man performance of historian Howard Zinn's play on the life of Karl Marx. No reservations necessary!
    • 7:30 pm, Weitz Center Theatre
Friday, September 27th
Thursday, September 26th
  • Omid Safi: Whose Freedom of Speech Counts?
    • Going back to (and before) the episode of Salman Rushdie, freedom of speech has always been contested in various Middle Eastern contexts.
    • 12:00 pm, Gould Library Athenaeum
Wednesday, September 25th
Saturday, September 21st
Friday, September 20th

May 2013

Thursday, May 30th
Sunday, May 26th
Friday, May 24th
Wednesday, May 22nd
Wednesday, May 15th
Thursday, May 9th
Wednesday, May 8th

April 2013

Sunday, April 28th
Saturday, April 27th
Friday, April 26th
Thursday, April 25th
Wednesday, April 24th
Tuesday, April 23rd
Monday, April 22nd
Tuesday, April 16th
Monday, April 15th
Sunday, April 14th
  • Alice in Wonderland
    • A music, dance, and theater performance by the Carleton Players, in collaboration with Flying Foot Forum. Directed by Joe Chvala.
    • 2:00 pm, Weitz Center Theater
Saturday, April 13th
Friday, April 12th
  • Nancy Wilkie Retirement Celebration: Film showings
    • Films showing impacts of illicit artifact trade: 7:30pm "The Manuscripts of Timbuktu," and 8:30 pm "On the Trail of the Tomb Robbers"
    • 7:30 pm, Boliou 104
  • Alice in Wonderland
    • A music, dance, and theater performance by the Carleton Players, in collaboration with Flying Foot Forum. Directed by Joe Chvala.
    • 7:30 pm, Weitz Center Theater
Thursday, April 11th
  • Reflections: What Matters to Me and Why
    • Series continues with talk by Qiguang Zhao, Burton and Lily Levin Professor of Chinese, on "Nature: My God, My Friend and My Healer."
    • 12:00 pm, Library Athenaeum
  • Alice in Wonderland
    • A music, dance, and theater performance by the Carleton Players, in collaboration with Flying Foot Forum. Directed by Joe Chvala.
    • 7:30 pm, Weitz Center Theater
Tuesday, April 9th

March 2013

Wednesday, March 13th
Saturday, March 2nd
Friday, March 1st

February 2013

Thursday, February 28th
Wednesday, February 27th
Tuesday, February 26th
Saturday, February 23rd
Friday, February 22nd
Thursday, February 21st
Wednesday, February 20th
Saturday, February 16th
Friday, February 15th
Thursday, February 14th
Sunday, February 10th
  • Dakota 38 Film Screening
    • A powerful film depicting the annual 330-mile horse ride commemorating the largest mass execution in US history on December 26, 1862.
    • 2:30 pm, Weitz Cinema
Thursday, February 7th
Wednesday, February 6th
Tuesday, February 5th
Friday, February 1st

January 2013

Wednesday, January 30th
Wednesday, January 23rd
Thursday, January 17th
Wednesday, January 16th
Tuesday, January 15th
  • This Jealous Earth
    • Scott Carpenter reads from his recent collection of fiction: "This Jealous Earth"
    • 4:30 pm, Gould Library Athenaeum
Friday, January 11th
  • John Peña: Daily Geology begins (through Mar. 13)
    • Peña presents daily drawings highlighting memorable, if unremarkable, experiences in a two-year-long autobiographical project.
    • Perlman Teaching Museum, Kaemmer Family Gallery
  • Ancient Masters in Modern Styles: Chinese Ink Paintings begins (through Mar. 13)
    • An exhibition of Chinese ink paintings from the 16th–21st Centuries
    • Perlman Teaching Museum, Braucher Gallery
  • Ancient Masters Lecture and Opening Reception
    • Lecture by Kathleen Ryor followed by exhibition reception, with music by Carleton Chinese Music Ensemble
    • 7:30 pm, Weitz 236 and Perlman Teaching Museum and Weitz Commons
  • Opera at the Weitz: LA SERVA PADRONA
    • Opera Workshop. Lawrence E. Burnett, production coordinator, Julian Pozniak '14, student director.
    • 8:00 pm, Weitz Center for Creativity - Theater
Thursday, January 10th
Tuesday, January 1st

December 2012

Tuesday, December 11th

November 2012

Wednesday, November 14th
Thursday, November 8th
Tuesday, November 6th
Saturday, November 3rd
Friday, November 2nd
  • Semaphore Fall Concert
    • Semaphore Repertory Dance Company will present the Fall Concert.
    • 7:30 pm, Weitz Theater
Thursday, November 1st
  • Art Talk: Two Teaching Exhibitions
    • Reception in honor of teaching exhibitions in French and History with student experts.
    • 4:30 pm, Perlman Teaching Museum and Weitz Center Commons

October 2012

Wednesday, October 31st
Monday, October 29th
Sunday, October 28th
  • Split Seconds
    • "Split Seconds" is the fall Carleton Players production by Michael Elyanow. Directed by Ruth Weiner.
    • 2:00 pm, Weitz Theater
Saturday, October 27th
  • Split Seconds
    • "Split Seconds" is the fall Carleton Players production written by Michael Elyanow. Directed by Ruth Weiner.
    • 7:30 pm, Weitz Theater
Friday, October 26th
  • Los hombres que dispararon en los quioscos
    • "Los hombres que dispararon en los quioscos: los autores de la novela popular en España" Speaker: Javier Pérez Andújar, Spanish Writer
    • 5:00 pm, LDC 104
  • Split Seconds
    • "Split Seconds" is the fall Carleton Players production. Written by Michael Elyanow, directed by Ruth Weiner.
    • 7:30 pm, Weitz Theater
Thursday, October 25th
Tuesday, October 23rd
Sunday, October 21st
Saturday, October 20th
Thursday, October 18th
Tuesday, October 16th
  • LTC Lunch; Dialogos:
    • "College Classrooms, Fiji Water, & the Individual: A Complex-Systems Approach". Lunch available at 11:45 a.m.; presentation begins at Noon.
    • 11:45 am, Weitz Center for Creativity; Room 236
  • India's notable and celebrated documentary filmmaker, Anand Patwardhan
    • Anand Patwardhan will talk about and show his film Jai Bhim Comrade: The atrocity of caste, a tradition of reason, a song that will be sung
    • 7:00 pm, The Weitz Center for Creativity Cinema
Thursday, October 11th
Tuesday, October 9th
Thursday, October 4th
Tuesday, October 2nd

September 2012

Thursday, September 27th
Monday, September 24th
  • Songs of Longing and Liberation
    • Concert and lecture/demo by classical Hindustani musicians Kalapini Komkali(vocalist),Raya Korgaokar(harmonium) and Sanjay Deshpande(tabla).
    • 7:00 pm, Weitz Center for Creativity Theatre
Saturday, September 22nd
  • Digital Humanities Workshop at Carleton
    • A two-day workshop for faculty and staff engaged in developing digital humanities projects at Carleton, Macalester, and St. Olaf colleges.
    • Weitz Center 236
Friday, September 21st
  • Digital Humanities Workshop at Carleton
    • A two-day workshop for faculty and staff engaged in developing digital humanities projects at Carleton, Macalester, and St. Olaf colleges.
    • Weitz Center 236
Friday, September 14th

May 2012

Thursday, May 24th
  • Skin-Close and Arm's Length
    • A luncheon presentation on "Migrants and Belonging in Contemporary Germany" by Pamela Feldman-Savelsberg and Daniel Williams
    • 12:00 pm, Gould Library Athenaeum
Wednesday, May 23rd
Sunday, May 20th
Friday, May 18th
  • Photographing the Social Body: Malian Portraiture from the Studio to the Street ends
    • Mali in West Africa is home to many talented photographers and to a rich photographic culture. This exhibition explores photographic portraiture, considering both renowned studio photographers and work by generations of photographers who have come of age artistically since the Bamako Biennial, a recurring pan-African photography exhibition established in 1994.
    • Perlman Teaching Museum, Kaemmer Family Gallery
  • Informal discussion w/Uday Prakash, 2012 Lindesmith Lecturer
    • Informal discussion of translated stories. Limited to 20 people - please contact achaklad@carleton.edu to receive copies of stories.
    • 4:00 pm, LOME Lounge WCC
Wednesday, May 16th
Tuesday, May 15th
Monday, May 14th
Friday, May 11th
Thursday, May 10th
Tuesday, May 8th
Thursday, May 3rd
Wednesday, May 2nd
Tuesday, May 1st

April 2012

Thursday, April 26th
Wednesday, April 25th
Tuesday, April 24th
Monday, April 23rd
Saturday, April 21st
  • Foro Latinoamericano
    • Fordlandia: The Rise and Fall of Henry Ford’s Forgotten Jungle City
    • 9:30 am, Gould Library Athenaeum
Friday, April 20th
Thursday, April 19th
  • Celebrating the Shahnameh
    • Panel discussion: Professor Adeeb Khalid, Professor Yaron Klein, and Dr. William N. Buffet '55
    • 5:15 pm, Gould Library Athenaeum
Saturday, April 14th
Friday, April 13th
Saturday, April 7th
  • Hula: Free Master dance class
    • A dance class taught by Dietrix Jon Duhaylonsod, Kumu Hula offered - all are welcome! No age or dance experience required!
    • 10:00 am, Weitz Center, Large Dance Studio #165
  • Hula: Performance of Halau Kiawekupono O Ka Ua
    • Hula?? In Northfield?? Yes, and aloha! Come see this "halau" of 8 Hawaiian men dance traditional hula on the Weitz Center stage.
    • 7:30 pm, Weitz Center Theater
Thursday, April 5th
Wednesday, April 4th
Tuesday, April 3rd
  • A Walking Guide to Virtual Shakespeare
    • Presentation by Katherine Rowe, Chair and Professor of English at Bryn Mawr College
    • 11:55 am, Interactive Classroom (Weitz 235), Weitz Center for Creativity
Monday, April 2nd

March 2012

Saturday, March 31st
  • Perlman Teaching Museum Community Open House
    • Enjoy two exhibitions and a 3:30pm gallery talk by Kristin Makholm from the MN Museum of American Art, along with family art activities!
    • 2:00 pm, Perlman Teaching Museum, Weitz Center for Creativity
Friday, March 30th
  • Photographing the Social Body: Malian Portraiture from the Studio to the Street begins (through May 18)
    • Mali in West Africa is home to many talented photographers and to a rich photographic culture. This exhibition explores photographic portraiture, considering both renowned studio photographers and work by generations of photographers who have come of age artistically since the Bamako Biennial, a recurring pan-African photography exhibition established in 1994.
    • Perlman Teaching Museum, Kaemmer Family Gallery
Thursday, March 29th
Sunday, March 11th
  • A Complex Weave: Women and Identity in Contemporary Art ends
    • A Complex Weave reveals the ongoing vitality of the Feminist artist movement with works by contemporary women artists of varied backgrounds exploring aspects of identity through painting, drawing, needlework, photography and other media.
    • Perlman Teaching Museum, Braucher Gallery
  • Running the Numbers: Portraits of Mass Consumption ends
    • Artist Chris Jordan composes huge color photographs based on statistical facts about American consumer culture.
    • Perlman Teaching Museum, Kaemmer Family Gallery
Thursday, March 1st

February 2012

Monday, February 27th
  • "Foucault on Biopower and Governmentality," by Professor Mihaela Czobor-Lupp
    • Professor Czobor-Lupp is a member of the Carleton Political Science Department, where she teaches modern and contemporary political theory, democratic theory, critical theory, post-modernism, and politics and literature. This special public event is sponsored by the Humanities Center at Carleton.
    • 5:00 pm, Gould Library Athenaeum
Sunday, February 26th
  • Living Electric Theater: Cinema Emerges in Northfield
    • Carol Donelan, Associate Professor of Cinema and Media Studies at Carleton College, will offer a narrated tour through re-created episodes in Northfield’s early moviegoing history in the cinema at the Weitz Center for Creativity on Sunday, February 26 at 2:00pm. In addition to the lecture, early short films and a stellar cast of local musicians and performers will enliven the show. Come experience the movies as they once were. The event is co-sponsored by Carleton’s Humanities Center and Cinema & Media Studies Department, the Northfield Historical Society, the Northfield News and KYMN Radio. Free and open to the public. Refreshments will be served.
    • 2:00 pm, WCC 161 - Weitz Cinema
Thursday, February 23rd
Tuesday, February 21st
Friday, February 17th
Wednesday, February 15th
  • "In Between"
    • Ibrahim Miari is an actor, writer, director, choreographer and Sufi dance with the Acco Theatre Center in Israel. "In Between" is a semi autobiographical one man show about his experience growing up in Israel in a mixed Jewish and Muslim family. The play touches upon issues such as identity, culture, religion, traditions, and the tensions between Jews and Arabs.
    • 7:30 pm, Weitz Cinema
Thursday, February 9th
Friday, February 3rd
Thursday, February 2nd

January 2012

Thursday, January 26th
Wednesday, January 25th
Tuesday, January 24th
  • LTC Lunch: Dialogos II: Aliens Among Them—Experiences of (Not) Belonging in Europe Today
    • Is migration in Europe fundamentally different today than in the past? How do members of particular migrant communities experience marginalization in Europe, and how does this marginalization affect both the host country and the communities themselves? This presentation will explore commonalities among very different migrant groups (Chinese, Indian, former Soviet) in the United Kingdom and the Netherlands.
    • 11:45 am, Weitz Center for Creativity. Larson Meeting Room, 236
Thursday, January 19th
  • Laura Brown: A Lecture on Non-Human Literary Genres
    • Laura Brown, the Fred W. and Margaret C. Schuster Distinguished Visiting Lecturer in Literature, will speak on "Non-Human Genres: Love, Paradise, and the Rise of the Animal in English Literature."
    • 4:00 pm, Athenaeum, Gould Library
Friday, January 13th
  • A Complex Weave: Women and Identity in Contemporary Art begins (through Mar. 11)
    • A Complex Weave reveals the ongoing vitality of the Feminist artist movement with works by contemporary women artists of varied backgrounds exploring aspects of identity through painting, drawing, needlework, photography and other media.
    • Perlman Teaching Museum, Braucher Gallery
  • Running the Numbers: Portraits of Mass Consumption begins (through Mar. 11)
    • Artist Chris Jordan composes huge color photographs based on statistical facts about American consumer culture.
    • Perlman Teaching Museum, Kaemmer Family Gallery
Thursday, January 12th
  • Public talk, History of Leprosy, Kathleen Vongsathorn, '07, Oxford
    • "What Suffering Will Be Saved": Replacing Stigma with Charity in the History of Leprosy from the Middle Ages to the Present, Gould Library Athenaeum, free and open to the public, light refreshments event, sponsored by MARS and the History Department Herbert P. Lefler Speaker endowment.
    • 5:00 pm, Gould Library Athenaeum
Wednesday, January 11th
Tuesday, January 10th

November 2011

Tuesday, November 8th
Saturday, November 5th
  • Somali Famine Panel: Special Envoy Mr. Abukar Arman, Prof Ahmed Samatar, Macalester & Mr. Mohamed Hassan, ARC-Somalia
    • Asiya Mohamoud Gaildon, '14, and the Somali Famine Relief Group at Carleton have organized a panel discussion featuring Mr. Abukar Arman, Representative of the Somali Transitional Federal Government, Professor Ahmed I. Samatar, Somali professor of International Relations at Macalester College, and Mr. Mohamed Hassan from ARC-Somalia, to raise awareness of the devastating famine currently crippling Somalia and Somalia’s delicate sociopolitical state. This panel is sponsored by The Humanities Center, the African and African American Studies program and the Chaplain's Office. Everyone is invited to attend. The panel is scheduled for Saturday, November 5 from 12:00-2:00 p.m. in Boliou 104. Please contact Asiya Mohamoud Gaildon for further information at: gaildona@carleton.edu
    • 12:00 pm, Boliou 104
Thursday, November 3rd
  • 'Seeing is Knowing: the Universe' exhibition tour
    • Tour the large gallery at the Teaching Museum with Joel Weisberg, physics and astronomy; Dan Bruggeman, studio art; Victoria Morse, history
    • 12:00 pm, Teaching Museum, Weitz Center for Creativity
  • Humanities Center Panel: Perspectives on the Arab Spring
    • Speakers: Yaron Klein (Middle Eastern Languages), Dana Strand (French and Francophone Studies) and Devashree Gupta (Political Science): This panel presentation on the Arab Spring will examine the role of music, social media, film and literature in shaping the protest movements that began in Tunisia in the spring of 2011 and continue throughout the Middle East. Please see more...
    • 7:30 pm, Weitz Center for Creativity Large Meeting Room 236
Wednesday, November 2nd
Tuesday, November 1st

October 2011

Sunday, October 30th
  • The Tempest - ALL performances sold out
    • Final performance of The Tempest, Shakespeare’s final play. Magic and monsters and storms, oh my! Will Prospero get revenge? Will Miranda find true love? Will Caliban take over the enchanted isle? Shakespeare’s The Tempest will answer all. Opens Thursday, October 27, runs Friday, October 28, Saturday, October 29, 2011 all at 7:30 pm, and on Sunday, October 30 at 2:00 pm. To reserve seats for The Tempest, please call 507-222-4471. Leave your name, date and time, name of the play, and the number of seats that you would like to reserve. Productions are general admission and free of charge.
    • 2:00 pm, Weitz Center Theater
  • Play, Shakespeare's The Tempest
    • Final performance: Sunday, October 30, 2011, 2:00 pm Directed by guest Director Ed Berkeley, '66, Director of Undergraduate Opera Studies for The Juilliard School, Director of Aspen Opera Theater Center, Aspen Music Festival and School, and Artistic Director of New York’s Willow Cabin Theater Company. A class with Stephen Mohring, Art Dept, will design the production, and music is being written by David Kornfeld, '11. To reserve seats for The Tempest, please call 507-222-4471. Leave your name, date and time, name of the play, and number of seats that you would like to reserve. Productions are general admission and free of charge.
    • 2:00 pm, Weitz Center Theater
Saturday, October 29th
  • The Tempest- all performances sold out
    • Shakespeare’s final play: The Tempest. Magic and monsters and storms, oh my! Will Prospero get revenge? Will Miranda find true love? Will Caliban take over the enchanted isle? Shakespeare’s The Tempest will answer all. Opens Thursday, October 27, runs Friday, October 28, Saturday, October 29, 2011 all at 7:30 pm, and on Sunday, October 30 at 2:00 pm. To reserve seats for The Tempest, please call 507-222-4471. Leave your name, date and time, name of the play, and the number of seats that you would like to reserve. Productions are general admission and free of charge.
    • 7:30 pm, Weitz Center Theater
  • Play, Shakespeare's The Tempest
    • Directed by guest Director Ed Berkeley, '66, Director of Undergraduate Opera Studies for The Juilliard School, Director of Aspen Opera Theater Center, Aspen Music Festival and School, and Artistic Director of New York’s Willow Cabin Theater Company. A class with Stephen Mohring, Art Dept, will design the production, and music is being written by David Kornfeld, '11. To reserve seats for The Tempest, please call 507-222-4471. Leave your name, date and time, name of the play, and number of seats that you would like to reserve. Productions are general admission and free of charge.
    • 7:30 pm, Weitz Center Theater
Friday, October 28th
  • The Tempest- all performances sold out
    • Shakespeare’s final play: The Tempest. Magic and monsters and storms, oh my! Will Prospero get revenge? Will Miranda find true love? Will Caliban take over the enchanted isle? Shakespeare’s The Tempest will answer all. Opens Thursday, October 27, runs Friday, October 28, Saturday, October 29, 2011 all at 7:30 pm, and on Sunday, October 30 at 2:00 pm. To reserve seats for The Tempest, please call 507-222-4471. Leave your name, date and time, name of the play, and the number of seats that you would like to reserve. Productions are general admission and free of charge.
    • 7:30 pm, Weitz Center Theater
  • Play, Shakespeare's The Tempest
    • Directed by guest Director Ed Berkeley, '66, Director of Undergraduate Opera Studies for The Juilliard School, Director of Aspen Opera Theater Center, Aspen Music Festival and School, and Artistic Director of New York’s Willow Cabin Theater Company. A class with Stephen Mohring, Art Dept, will design the production, and music is being written by David Kornfeld, '11. To reserve seats for The Tempest, please call 507-222-4471. Leave your name, date and time, name of the play, and number of seats that you would like to reserve. Productions are general admission and free of charge.
    • 7:30 pm, Weitz Center Theater
Thursday, October 27th
  • Careers in Social Justice Panel: Year of Service
    • Alumni who work in social justice service areas will talk about their careers on Thursday, 10/27, noon to 1pm, in Leighton 305. Pizza will be served. Stay tuned for more details.
    • 12:00 pm, Leighton 305
  • Prof Adeeb Khalid, Nation, Empire, and Revolution in the Making of Modern Central Asia, Jane & Raphael Bernstein Professorship Public Talk
    • Thurs, Oct 27, 2011, 5 pm, Jane and Raphael Bernstein Asian Studies and History Professorship Public Talk by Prof Adeeb Khalid, Nation, Empire, and Revolution in the Making of Modern Central Asia, Gould Library Athenaeum
    • 5:00 pm, Gould Library Athenaeum
  • The Tempest- all performances sold out
    • Shakespeare’s final play: The Tempest. Magic and monsters and storms, oh my! Will Prospero get revenge? Will Miranda find true love? Will Caliban take over the enchanted isle? Shakespeare’s The Tempest will answer all. Opens Thursday, October 27, runs Friday, October 28, Saturday, October 29, 2011 all at 7:30 pm, and on Sunday, October 30 at 2:00 pm. To reserve seats for The Tempest, please call 507-222-4471. Leave your name, date and time, name of the play, and the number of seats that you would like to reserve. Productions are general admission and free of charge.
    • 7:30 pm, Weitz Center Theater
Tuesday, October 25th
  • Opening Faculty and Staff Reception and Champagne Toast
    • The Humanities Center at the Weitz Center welcomes Carleton Faculty and Staff for our Opening Faculty and Staff Reception and Champagne Toast.
    • 4:30 pm, Weitz Center, Room 223
  • Reading by Nuruddin Farah
    • Award winning novelist from Somalia, Nuruddin Farah, will read from his work.
    • 5:00 pm, The Weitz Center's Large Meeting Room, 236
  • Honor, Shame, Family & Gender--Cinematic Representations of Middle East Societies between Tradition & Modernity
    • Eight selected films (Turkish, Palestinian, Egyptian and Iranian--all with English subtitles) will be presented and accompanied by short introductions and Q&A after screening of each film. Coordinator: Prof. Avraham Sela
    • 6:30 pm, Boliou 104
  • Public film event, Patricio Guzmán's 'Nostalgia for the Light'
    • Patricio Guzmán's 'Nostalgia for the Light' 2010 film. Film screening. Introductions to the film and historical context by Andrew Fisher, History department and independent filmmaker Cecilia Cornejo. Filmmaker Guzman, known for political documentaries, sets this filmic meditation on time, space, history and memory in Chile’s Atacama Desert, where astronomers peer into distant galaxies and relatives of “disappeared” political prisoners seek remains of their loved ones.
    • 7:30 pm, Weitz Center for Creativity Cinema
Thursday, October 20th
  • Reflections: What Matters to Me and Why
    • Reflections series of talks on life, work and meaning continues with talk "Thank God Dinosaurs aren't around any more!" by Matt Rand, Associate Professor of Biology. Lunch will be provided. Cosponsored with EthIC.
    • 12:00 pm, Library Athenaeum
  • History Fall Lefler Lecturer, Prof Giancarlo Casale, University of Minnesota, Ottoman historian
    • "What did it mean to be a European in the Sixteenth Century? A View from the Ottoman Empire"
    • 5:00 pm, Leighton 305
  • Un secret, Claude Miller 2007
    • Carleton College concludes its inaugural Tournées French Film Festival with a public screening of Claude Miller’s compelling drama, “Un Secret,” on Thursday, Oct. 20 at 7:30 p.m. in the Weitz Center for Creativity Cinema. The film will be shown in French with English subtitles and Carleton faculty members will provide a brief introduction prior to the screening. This event is free and open to the public.
    • 7:30 pm, Weitz Center Cinema
Tuesday, October 18th
Monday, October 17th
  • "Art and Science as Parallel and Divergent Ways of Knowing"
    • The presentation is entitled "Art and Science as Parallel and Divergent Ways of Knowing" Nowadays, artists and scientists tend to think of their ways of probing the world as distinctly different. But such was not always the case (in fact the divide is only a few centuries old; think of Leonardo, think of the wonder cabinets of the seventeenth century). Lunch provided for 45
    • 12:00 pm, Weitz 236
  • "Business Ethics - Black, White or Gray?"
    • Talk about ethics in the professional world.
    • 7:00 pm, Gould Library Athenaeum
  • The Uncanny Valley: The Digital Animation of the Face:
    • The Carleton Art and Art History department, CAMS and Viz are pleased to announce the upcoming lecture of Lawrence Weschler, who will be speaking in ( Weitz Center 230/ Boliou 104) at 7:30 pm Monday, October 17
    • 7:30 pm, Boliou 161 (handicapped accessible)
Friday, October 14th
Thursday, October 13th
Tuesday, October 11th
  • LTC Lunch: Indigineity and the Holocaust as Global Discourses; Dialogos Faculty Research Talk
    • What happens when one people's specific experience is appropriated by other people in other places to describe their own struggles? This talk examines how Native Americans and Palestinians have appropriated the Jewish narrative of the Holocaust to characterize their sufferings, while Jewish Israelis and Palestinians have usurped the language of indigeneity to describe their respective situations.
    • 11:45 am, Weitz Center for Creativity
  • Public talk, Professor Tim Beach, Environmental History of the Maya
    • Environmental History of the Maya: Impacts, Landesque Capital and Collapse, public talk to be presented by Professor Tim Beach, Geography and Geoscience, Cinco Hermanos Cahir in Environment and International Affairs, Director of Center for Environment, Georgetown University. The talk will address the main drivers and evidence for Maya environmental history, landesque capital development by the Maya, and the regional collapses and transitions in the Mayan world. Sponsored by the Environmental Studies Program, Geology, the History and SoAn Departments, and The Humanities Center.
    • 5:00 pm, Leighton 305
  • Honor, Shame, Family & Gender--Cinematic Representations of Middle East Societies between Tradition & Modernity
    • Eight selected films (Turkish, Palestinian, Egyptian and Iranian--all with English subtitles) will be presented and accompanied by short introductions and Q&A after screening of each film. Coordinator: Prof. Avraham Sela
    • 6:30 pm, Boliou 104
  • Potiche - François Ozon - 2010
    • The thrillingly incongruous image of Catherine Deneuve, the long-reigning queen of French cinema, in curlers and a cherry-red track suit is just one of the many delights in François Ozon’s 1977-set comedy, a very loose adaptation of a boulevard-theater production. The film’s title translates as “trophy wife,” the position that Deneuve’s Suzanne Pujol has held for decades in her loveless marriage to philandering umbrella-factory owner Robert. When labor unrest causes the high-strung Robert to suffer a collapse, the intrepid Suzanne steps in, endearing herself to the workers and rekindling a romance with a Communist ex-lover and union liaison, Babin. Much as he did in his 1950s-set film 8 Women, Ozon creates a stunning period piece, perfectly re-creating the 1970s through costume, hairstyle, décor, and music, epitomized in Suzanne and Babin’s outing at a disco. But above all, Potiche is a showcase for the formidable talents of Deneuve, whose comic timing proves just as impeccable as her dramatic delivery. As Suzanne breaks free of her coddled life, she realizes, just like many other women who discovered feminism in the 1970s, that the personal really is political.
    • 7:30 pm, Weitz Center Cinema
Monday, October 10th
  • Realism and the Reality of Blood
    • Welcome to Latin American Studies! Come to the Latin American Studies welcome reception. Come share your abroad experience with other students who were in Latin American last year and learn about the program, the Brazil ACM exchange, and all things Latin American on campus. The reception will follow the talk by professor Durão. Professor Fabio Durão, UNICAMP (Brazil) When: Monday, October 10 at 5pm the Athenaeum Reception to begin at 6:00pm. Sponsored by Latin American Studies Dept., Spanish Dept., The Humanities Center, and the Dean of the College Office.
    • 5:00 pm, Gould Library Athenaeum
  • Public talk, Dr. Fabio Durão, Towards a Model of Inclusive Exclusion: Marginal Subjectivation in Rio de Janeiro
    • Towards a Model of Inclusive Exclusion: Marginal Subjectivation in Rio de Janeiro Gould Library Athenaeum: Welcome to Latin American Studies! Come to the Latin American Studies welcome reception. Come share your abroad experience with other students who were in Latin American last year and learn about the program, the Brazil ACM exchange, and all things Latin American on campus. The reception will follow the talk by Professor Durão. Professor Fabio Durão, UNICAMP (Brazil) When: Monday, October 10 at 5pm the Athenaeum Reception to begin at 6:00pm. Sponsored by Latin American Studies Dept., Spanish Dept., The Humanities Center, and the Dean of the College Office.
    • 5:00 pm, Gould Library Athenaeum
Friday, October 7th
Thursday, October 6th
  • Reflections: What Matters to Me and Why
    • The Reflections series of talks on life, work and meaning continues this fall with a talk by Professor Seth Greenberg. Lunch will be provided. Cosponsored with EthIC.
    • 12:00 pm, Library Athenaeum
  • Karsten Troyke & Trio Spreefalter
    • Karsten Troyke is one of the most well‐known singers and interpreters of Yiddish songs in Europe. Based in Berlin, he has performed throughout Europe and Israel and is featured on numerous CDs. Here tonight at Carleton under the auspices of the Christopher U. Light Lectureship
    • 7:00 pm, Chapel
  • White Material - Claire Denis - 2009
    • Marking the first collaboration between two titans of French cinema—director Claire Denis and actress Isabelle Huppert—White Material unfolds as a fever dream, a haunting, enigmatic look at the horrors of colonialism’s legacy, a subject that Denis first explored in her semiautobiographical debut feature, Chocolat (1988). Set in an unnamed African country during an unspecified time, White Material centers on Maria Vial, a coffee-plantation owner who is blindly determined to continue her business while civil war rages on around her. Chaos engulfs the nation, but Maria implores her workers, many of whom have already fled, to stay and harvest the coffee crop. Amid the increasingly violent anarchy, an injured rebel leader known only as “the Boxer” takes refuge at Maria’s farm; she offers him assistance but then becomes too distracted by her obsession to harvest the beans. Maria’s folly—though she’s a native Frenchwoman who immigrated to Africa to exploit the land, she proudly distinguishes herself from “dirty whites”—is matched by the sheer madness of child soldiers roaming the country, rifles in one hand, stuffed animals in the other.
    • 7:30 pm, Weitz Center Cinema
Wednesday, October 5th
  • Brush up on your Yiddish!
    • Karsten Troyke will be giving a lesson on understanding Yiddish. Sponsored by the Christopher U. Light Lecture.
    • 4:30 pm, LDC 104
Tuesday, October 4th
Monday, October 3rd
  • 'The Other Night Sky', followed by skygazing in Central Park
    • Artist, writer, experimental geographer Trevor Paglen has been exposing the secret activities of the U.S. military and intelligence agencies over the last eight years in books and large-scale landscape photographs. These 'Other Night Sky' images reveal secret spy satellites and other covert military operations.
    • 6:00 pm, Cinema, Weitz Center for Creativity; Central Park

September 2011

Tuesday, September 27th
  • A Demonstration and Conversation with artist Anil Chaitya Vangad of Ganjad Village, India
    • The Life and Art of the Indigenous Warli People of India: A Demonstration and Conversation with artist Anil Chaitya Vangad of Ganjad Village, India. The indigenous Warli people of rural western India revere the land as the infinitely creative energy of nature. Their dynamic folk paintings - traditionally done in rice paste on the mud walls of their homes - use a richly textured pictorial language to celebrate the divine balance of a life lived in meaningful coexistence with the natural world.
    • 12:00 pm, Weitz Center for Creativity, Room 148
  • Honor, Shame, Family & Gender--Cinematic Representations of Middle East Societies between Tradition & Modernity
    • Eight selected films (Turkish, Palestinian, Egyptian and Iranian--all with English subtitles) will be presented and accompanied by short introductions and Q&A after screening of each film. Coordinator: Prof. Avraham Sela
    • 6:30 pm, Boliou 104
  • L'Illusioniste -Sylvain Chomet - 2010
    • Sylvain Chomet’s delightful follow-up to 2003’s The Triplets of Belleville is another exquisitely animated film, one based on an unproduced script by the French comic genius Jacques Tati (which was given to Chomet by Tati’s own daughter). The Illusionist is set in the early 1960s, the time when Tati wrote the screenplay after his huge success with Mon Oncle (1958). As a homage to the source material, Chomet’s title character is the spitting image of Tati. This middle-aged, slightly stoop-shouldered magician is upstaged by his rabbit during performances in Paris; at his shows his London, the Illusionist can’t begin to compete with a wildly popular proto-Beatles band. But he finds far more appreciative audiences in small pubs in Scotland—and makes a devoted teenage friend, Alice, a poor cleaning girl who follows him to Edinburgh. The two form a touching father-daughter bond, with the Illusionist determined to secretly provide Alice with the nice clothes she so admires—finery that isn’t procured through magic, but through a series of funny odd jobs that the conjurer takes. Though neither the magician nor his young charge speaks each other’s language, The Illusionist, like Tati’s work, beautifully shows the ways people understand each other nonverbally.
    • 7:30 pm, Weitz Center Cinema
Friday, September 23rd
  • Imagining America Conference
    • This site visit will examine four different models of supporting local arts to strengthen rural communities,and showcase the work of artists, arts organizations, and colleges and universities that contribute to building vital rural communities. The projects come from three communities -- Northfield and Winona, Minnesota, and Meadville, Pennsylvania. Site visits will include an exhibition of photos taken by students, faculty, staff, and community members about learning beyond the classroom and celebrating community connections – at a new arts center at Carleton College, and a visit to the Northfield Arts Guild, a 50-year-old organization dedicated to visual and performance arts.
    • 1:00 pm, Weitz Center for Creativity, Large Conference Room
  • ACE Event - Weaving a Sustainable Food Web: Connecting Colleges and Community
    • 5:30 pm, Severance Great Hall
Thursday, September 22nd
  • "Un Prophète Jacques Audiard 2009
    • Malik, the 19-year-old French-Arab criminal vividly portrayed by Tahar Rahim enters prison as an uneducated naïf. But by the time he leaves jail, he will know how to read—and how to kill. Jacques Audiard’s intricate study of the bloody rules and rituals behind bars never once glorifies the shocking violence that becomes a rite of passage for Malik, who, friendless, feels he must do the savage bidding of a ferocious Corsican crime boss in exchange for protection. Instead, the director (sometimes referred to as the “French Scorsese”) examines prison as its own specific social system, its corruption, cronyism, and racism a reflection of France at large. As Malik begins to defy the Corsican overlord and make decisions of his own, he becomes drawn to another Muslim inmate who teaches him how to read and write. For as much as we cheer Malik’s small victories on his slow road to redemption, he remains a deliberately ambiguous hero— one who will always have copious blood on his hands.
    • 7:30 pm, Weitz Center Cinema
Tuesday, September 20th

May 2011

Thursday, May 19th
  • Family and Monarchy: Stuart Concepts of Dynastic Reproduction
    • Malcolm Smuts, Professor of History at the University of Massachusetts in Boston, will speak on the topic of "Family and Monarchy: Stuart Concepts of Dynastic Reproduction"
    • 5:00 pm, Boliou 104 (handicapped accessible)
  • Documentary as Symptom and Therapy: Montage, Moral Tropes and the Framing of Spanish Historical Memory
    • Dr. Faber was born and raised in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, where he studied Spanish. He is Professor and Chair of the Dept. of Hispanic Studies at Oberlin College, and he received his doctorate from the University of California, Davis. He is also the author of "Exile and Cultural Hegemony: Spanish Exiles in Mexico" (Vanderbilt, 2002), and "Anglo-American Hispanists and the Spanish Civil War"(Palgrave, 2008), as well as some fort articles on Spanish and Latin American literature, history and politics. In 2000 he won the George Watt Essay Prize in the graduate category, and has been on the ALBA board since 2004. He currently serves on the Executive Committee and chairs the Watt Prize jury.
    • 5:00 pm, Gould Library Athenaeum
Wednesday, May 18th
  • Ragamala performance of Sthree
    • Inspired by Silappatikaram (The Anklet), the national epic of the Tamil people of southeastern India, Ragamala Dance presents Sthree, a stunning convergence of dance, music and text that brings to the present the beauty of the Sangam Period of history.
    • 7:00 pm, Chapel
Monday, May 16th
  • Dialogos II: Gender and Identity in Contemporary East Asian Cinema
    • Women's Images and National Identity in Contemporary Chinese Cinema – Hong Zeng, Assistant Professor, Asian Languages and Literatures Masculinity and Minority Voice in Japanese Cinema – Noboru Tomonari, Masculinity and Minority Voice in Japanese Cinema, Associate Professor, Asian Languages and Literatures . Sponsored by the Humanities Center.
    • 4:00 pm, Gould Library Athenaeum
Friday, May 6th
  • “Transnational/Transcultural/Transgender Performances of Identity” with 2Fik and Denis M. Provencher, Phd.
    • Act 1. 2fik “Shooting identity: writing a new self” Act 2. Denis Provencher “Coming out à l'oriental : Maghrebi-French performances of gender, sexuality and religion” 2Fik is a Moroccan-French performance artist based in Montreal. He is an interdisciplinary artist that works in photography, video, and live performance in order to capture the tension of various identities. Provencher is an Associate Professor of French Studies at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County and author of Queer French: Globalization, Language, and Sexual Civilization.
    • 6:00 pm, Boliou 104
Thursday, May 5th
  • Sebastian Meyer '02 -- Photography On the Edge
    • Sebastian Meyer ('02) visits Carleton to speak about his work and career path. After graduating from Carleton with a major in French, Sebastian worked in France and London, moving gradually into professional photography. He now operates principally in northern Iraq, where he has set up the country's first photographic agency. A winner of numerous photography awards, Sebastian has published in top-flight venues (Time Magazine, The New York Times, The Guardian, The Sunday Times, and more). Sponsored by Global Engagement, French & Francophone Studies, Viz, and Art & Art History. A micro-exhibit of his work will be on display on 3rd LDC in April and May; more at http://www.sebmeyer.com
    • 4:30 pm, Boliou 104

April 2011

Tuesday, April 26th
Wednesday, April 20th
  • A Discussion with Richard Philcox, translator
    • Philcox has translated most of Conde's books (beginning with her first novel) and Conde has both expressed her confidence in him and said that she considers him "responsible" for the book in English - that is, for the flow and rhythm and music of the language.
    • 4:00 pm
  • Lost in the Labyrinth? Husserl, Ortega, and Gaos Confront the Challenges of Cultural Diversity.
    • Jesus Diaz is a Professor of Philosophy at Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia. He has written a lot about Husserl, Ortega, Gaos, Rorty, Descartes, etc.
    • 5:00 pm, Gould Library Athenaeum
  • Maryse Condé, "The Journey of a Caribbean Writer"
    • Maryse Condé, internationally acclaimed French Caribbean writer and Professor Emerita of Columbia University, is the author of sixteen novels including Segu, Windward Heights, Crossing the Mangrove, and Tituba, Black Witch of Salem, as well as Tales from the Heart: True Stories from My Childhood. Condé has garnered numerous literary awards including the prestigious “Prix de l’Académie française.” Through her historical fiction, Condé has given voice to lesser-known populations in the African diaspora. Sponsored by French and Francophone Studies, the Humanities Center, The Elizabeth Nason Distinguished Women Visitors Funds, and African and African American Studies.
    • 7:30 pm, Boliou 104
  • Karsten Troyke - POSTPONED UNTIL FALL
    • Performing on stage since 1982, Troyke had earlier worked as a gardener and with mentally handicapped children. He studied singing (with Leonore Gendries) as well as drama and speaking, and in 1990 he gave up his work to dedicate himself completely to musical performance and theater. Troyke participated in radio plays, worked as a voice actor (dubbing), and participated in various stage plays. As a singer, his album Yiddish Anders (1992) received the praise of German record critics. Jidische Vergessene Lieder (1997) contained previously unpublished songs of Sara Bialas Tenenberg, who became his mentor for the Yiddish language. In his performances Troyke often works with Bettina Wegner, Suzanna and the Trio Scho. His interpretations of the songs of Georg Kreisler received mention in the writer/musician's 2005 biography. In 2006 two documentaries, Yiddish Soul and Concert Yiddish Soul, featured Troyke and other performers of Yiddish music.
    • 8:00 pm, Concert Hall
Tuesday, April 19th
  • Karsten Troyke - POSTPONED UNTIL FALL
    • Karsten Troyke, German singer, actor and speaker. Performing on stage since 1982, Troyke has been featured in radio plays, as a voice actor, and in various stage plays.
    • 12:00 pm, Gould Library Athenaeum
  • A Conversation with Maryse Condé
    • A conversation with Maryse Condé, a Guadeloupean, French language author of historical fiction, best known for her novel "Segu" (1984–1985). Condé's novels explore racial, gender and cultural issues in a variety of historical eras and locales, including the Salem witch trials in "I, Tituba: Black Witch of Salem" (1992) and the 19th century Bambara Empire of Mali in Segu (1987). Her novels trace the relationships between African peoples and the diaspora, especially the Caribbean. She has taken considerable distance from most Caribbean literary movements, such as Negritude and Creolité, and has often focused on topics with strong feminist concerns. Her recent writings have become increasingly autobiographical, such as "Memories of My Childhood" and "Victoire", a biography of her grandmother. "Who Slashed Celinaire's Throat" also shows traces of her paternal great-grandmother.
    • 4:00 pm, LDC 104
Saturday, April 16th
  • Foro Latinoamericano
    • "Habitar, Construir, Pensar". 'Bajo qué circumstancias políticas culturales se crea arte "dentro de la Revolución"' Dennys Matos Leyva. He was born in Cuba and currently resides in Madrid, Spain. He is an art critic, curator and essayist. He does freelance work for various contemporary art publications. He has curated numerous art exhibits. His most recent book of essays "Paisajes, Metáforas de nuestro tiempo" (2009) is an important contribution to the study of postcommunist culture.
    • 9:30 am, Gould Library Athenaeum
Friday, April 15th
  • Convocation: Louis Menand
    • Harvard University professor of English and American literature and language, Louis Menand is widely considered to be the foremost modern scholar of American studies. He is the author of the Pulitzer Prize winning The Metaphysical Club, a detailed history of American intellectual and philosophical life in the 19th and 20th centuries. His recent book The Marketplace of Ideas, has sparked a debate about the future of American education. Has American higher education become a dinosaur? Why do professors all tend to think alike? What makes it so hard for colleges to decide which subjects should be required? Why do teachers and scholars find it so difficult to transcend the limits of their disciplines? Why, in short, are problems that should be easy for universities to solve so intractable? The answer, Menand argues, is that the institutional structure and the educational philosophy of higher education have remained the same for one hundred years, while faculties and student bodies have radically changed and technology has drastically transformed the way people produce and disseminate knowledge. Sponsored by the Fred W. and Margaret C. Schuster Distinguished Visiting Lecturer in Literature Fund, the title of his presentation is "Why the Case for Liberal Education is Hard to Make."
    • 10:50 am, Skinner Chapel
  • Foro Latinoamericano
    • "The Art of Writing Between Cultures: Translation and Dialogue in the Russian Trilogy Novels" José Manuel Prieto. He was born in Havana, Cuba. He is the author of several novels, non-fiction books, articles and essays and he is also a translator of Russian literature So Spanish. Some of his books include "Livadia, Enciclopedia de una vida en Rusia, El Tartamudo y la Rusa, and Treinta días en Moscú." "Rex", his most recent novel came out in the Spring of 2007, published by Anagrama, in Barcelona with simultanious editions in German, French and English. Following the talk at 4:45 will be a Response to José Manuel Pireto's Conference with Professor Jorge Brioso.
    • 4:00 pm, Gould Library Athenaeum
  • Foro Latinoamericano: Musical Concert: Nachito Herrera and his Trio
    • Igancio "Nachito" Herrera was born in Cuba. He combines the rhythms of his native Cuba with other musical traditions such as jazz and classical music. In the late 1990's, nachito joined the famed ¡Cubanismo! as its lead pianist, arranger, and musical director, playing many of the worlds finest concert halls and prestigious festivals. After his 2009 tour with The Afro Cuban All Stars, Nachito is doing extensive worldwide touring on his own. At Carleton, he will delight us with his Tiro.
    • 8:00 pm, Concert Hall
Tuesday, April 12th
  • David Garneau Lecture
    • David Garneau will give a lecture about his artwork on display in Gould Library, March 28th-June 5th. Refreshments will be served.
    • 4:00 pm, Gould Library Athenaeum
Monday, April 11th
Thursday, April 7th
  • Film Screening of "El gran Vazquez" with director Oscar Aibar
    • Oscar Aibar is a Spanish writer and a film director from Barcelona and currently he lives in Madrid. He is the author of comics, short stories, and three prestigious novels [Tu mente extiende cheques que tu cuerpo no puede pagar (2002); Los comedores de tiza (2004); and Making of (2008)], as well as four films [Atolladero (1995); Platillos Volantes (2003); La máquina de bailar (2006); and El gran Vázquez (2010)]. If you are interested, you can read some reviews about his latest film "El gran Vazquez" http://www.screendaily.com/reviews/latest-reviews/-the-great-vazquez-el-gran-vazquez/5018520.article http://cineuropa.org/video.aspx?lang=en&documentID=155917 http://nymag.com/listings/movie/the-great-vazquez-el-gra/
    • 6:30 pm, Olin 149

March 2011

Thursday, March 31st
  • Imagining the Mediterranean in the Fourteenth Century
    • Gazing around the familiar Mediterranean world in 1338, what did an Italian priest and polemicist see? What did this world of complex fault lines among faiths, political groups, and differing historical experiences look like? Through maps, texts and drawings, Opicino de Canistris explained to contemporary Christians their place in the world and why it mattered; Victoria Morse will explain his explanation to a 21st-century audience. Discussant: Victoria Morse, Associate Professor of History; Respondent: David Lefkowitz, Associate Professor of Art. Lunch provided for 50. Dialogos Faculty Research Series; co-sponsored by the Humanities Center.
    • 11:45 am, Gould Library Athenaeum

February 2011

Sunday, February 27th
  • "The Last Firefly"
    • World premiere play by Naomi Iizuka. Based on Japanese folk tales. Suitable for children.
    • 2:00 pm, Arena Theater
Saturday, February 26th
  • "The Last Firefly"
    • World premiere play by Naomi Iizuka. Based on Japanese folk tales. Suitable for children.
    • 2:00 pm, Arena Theater
  • "The Last Firefly"
    • World premiere play by Naomi Iizuka. Based on Japanese folk tales. Suitable for children.
    • 7:30 pm, Arena Theater
Friday, February 25th
  • Heather Dubrow reads from her new poetry collection
    • Heather Dubrow, Professor of English and Rev. John Boyd, S.J. Chair in the Poetic Imagination at Fordham University, reads from her new poetry collection, Forms and Hollows, to be published in February 2011 by Cherry Grove. In addition to her academic publications, Professor Dubrow has previously published two chapbooks of poetry and is the director of the "Poets Outloud" series in New York. Sponsored by the Humanities Center, the Department of English, and the Elizabeth Nason Distinguished Women Visitors Fund.
    • 4:00 pm, Gould Library Athenaeum
  • "The Last Firefly"
    • World premiere play by Naomi Iizuka. Based on Japanese folk tales. Suitable for children.
    • 7:30 pm, Arena Theater
Thursday, February 24th
Tuesday, February 22nd
Sunday, February 20th
Saturday, February 19th
  • Playwriting Workshop with Naomi Iizuka
    • Playwriting workshop with the author of The Last Firefly
    • 8:30 am, Sayles-Hill 251
  • "The Last Firefly"
    • World premiere play by Naomi Iizuka. Based on Japanese folk tales. Suitable for children.
    • 2:00 pm, Arena Theater
  • "The Last Firefly"
    • World premiere play by Naomi Iizuka. Based on Japanese folk tales. Suitable for children.
    • 7:30 pm, Arena Theater
  • An Evening of Turkish Music
    • Internationally renowned musicians Ahmet Erdoğdular (vocals) and Münir Beken (ud) will perform a concert of Ottoman and Turkish classical music.
    • 8:00 pm, Concert Hall
Friday, February 18th
  • "The Last Firefly"
    • World premiere play by Naomi Iizuka. Based on Japanese folk tales. Suitable for children.
    • 7:30 pm, Arena Theater
Thursday, February 17th
  • Turkish Vocal Arts: Lecture Demonstration
    • Join vocalist Ahmet Erdoğdular for a lecture demonstration on Turkish vocal arts as a prelude to his concert with Münir Beken on Saturday, February 19. Ahmet will discuss and demonstrate Turkish vocal improvisatory forms through their melodies, lyrics and modes (makams), while accompanying himself on tanbur (long-necked lute).
    • 12:00 pm, Gould Library, Athenaeum
  • "Holywood, Pirated Videos and Child Soldiers", Lecture by Emmanuel Dongala
    • Emmanuel Dongala, Professor of Chemistry at Bard College, is the winner of numerous literary prizes including the Grand Prix de Littérature de l'Afrique Noire, the Prix de la Fondation de France, and the prize for the best French novel of 2010 from the literary magazine Lire. His works have been translated into more than a dozen languages. In 1998, the Congolese Civil war forced Dongala, who was then professor of Chemistry and Dean of the University, to flee his country, which he was able to do with the help of his friend, the novelist Philip Roth. Dongala's novel, Johnny Mad Dog,was made into an award-winning film.
    • 4:00 pm, LDC 104
Wednesday, February 16th
  • Dialogos 2: Faculty Research Exchange
    • "The Philosophy of Place" Beth McKinsey, English and American Studies: "Zanita: Women and the Wild in 19th Century Yosemite" and Adriana Estill, English and American Studies: "Not Black, Not Quite White: Making a Place for Hispanic Beatuy in the 19th Century"
    • 4:00 pm, Gould Library Athenaeum
  • Film Screening of "Johnny Mad Dog"
    • Directed by Jean Stéphane Sauvaire and based on the novel by Emmanuel Dongala. The novel recounts the poignant fate of child soldiers in the Congolese civil war. Winner of the prestigious prix de l'espoir at the Cannes film festival in 2008. Here's the NYT review of the film from January 20, 2011: http://movies.nytimes.com/2011/01/21/movies/21roundup-JOHNNYMADDOG_RVW.html?scp=1&s
    • 8:00 pm, Boliou
Monday, February 14th
Thursday, February 10th
  • Dervishes and Cantors: Muslim-Jewish Musical Encounters, Empire to Nation
    • Maureen Jackson, PhD ACLS Postdoctoral New Faculty Fellow, Department of Middle Eastern Languages This talk is based on Dr. Jackson's ethnographic fieldwork in Istanbul. It will focus on music-making among Turkish Jews and Muslims amidst social ruptures and continuities across the 20th and 21st centuries.
    • 7:30 pm, Library Athenaeum
Wednesday, February 9th
Tuesday, February 8th
  • Prof David Wiles presentation,The Color Line,Af/Af Am Angelina Weld Grimke Brown Bag Conversation Series
    • The African and African American Studies Program is pleased to announce Professor David Wiles, who will be doing a reading with a student cast of a section of his play. The working title of the play is "The Color Line." It's set in New York in 1928 during the Harlem Renaissance and deals with, among other things, the issue of racial passing. This event is part of the AF/AFAM Angelina Weld Grimke Brown Bag Conversation Series. This series honors Angelina Weld Grimke (1880-1958), the first African American female student to attend Carleton's Preparatory Academy from 1895 to 1897. Future presentations will explore subjects related to black diasporic experiences and histories across a broad geography including Africa, the Caribbean, North and South America, Europe, and Asia.
    • 12:00 pm, Library Athenaeum
Thursday, February 3rd
Tuesday, February 1st
  • Schuster Lecture by Karen Tei Yamashita '73
    • The Fred W. and Margaret C. Schuster Distinguished Visiting Lecturer in Literature, Karen Tei Yamashita '73, will speak on “Placing Asian America: I Hotel and the Archives of Fiction” A reception and book-signing will follow the talk. Ms. Yamashita's most recent novel, I Hotel, was a finalist for the 2010 National Book Award in Fiction.
    • 4:30 pm, Boliou Auditorium 104

January 2011

Wednesday, January 26th
Tuesday, January 25th
Tuesday, January 18th
  • Jonis Agee on the Art of Fiction
    • The author of five collections of short stories and five novels including "River Wife", Jonis Agee has been hailed by the New York Times as “a gifted poet of that dark lushness in the heart of the American landscape.” Three of her works have been chosen as New York Times Notable Books. Other awards include a National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship, the Loft McKnight Award of Distinction, and Editor’s Choice Award from Foreword Magazine. Jonis Agee is the Christopher U. Light Lecturer in Literature.
    • 4:00 pm, Gould Library Athenaeum
Wednesday, January 12th
  • Sahlins Reading Group, Session I
    • Van Dusenbery: Introduction to Marshall Sahlins. Bill North: Introduction & The Polynesian War (with apologies to Thucydides)
    • 3:15 pm, Laird 211
Friday, January 7th
  • The Art of Sight, Sound and Heart: Visualizing Japanese Theater
    • January 7-March 9, 2011: Japanese theater, in its two classic forms, is rooted in ancient religion (Noh) and buoyed by popular culture (Kabuki). Visualizing Japanese Theater at the Carleton College Art Gallery, presenting paintings, woodblock prints and printed ephemera; carved masks, figurines and netsuke; and other objects, will explore Kabuki and Noh objects and imagery from the 18th through the 20th centuries. The Exhibition will be enriched by lectures and performances by nationally and internationally known theater and dance performers engaged in transforming traditional forms.
    • Art Gallery
  • The Path of the Onnagata: From Male to Female
    • A lecture/performance by David Furumoto, an expert on traditional Japanese theater and other Asian theater forms at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.
    • 7:30 pm, Boliou Hall Auditorium
Thursday, January 6th
  • Dialogos I: Faculty Research Exchange
    • George Shuffelton (English): "Father Chaucer, Pornographic Chaucer," with comments by Carol Donelan (CAMS). Though Chaucer has never been granted a particularly central place in the American pantheon of cultural forebears, his writing has served judges, film makers, and critics as a boundary marker for definitions of obscenity and pornography. Among other evidence, this talk reviews Federal legal cases involving George Carlin's comedy routines, Florida textbooks, 1970s "soft-core" pornography, public funding of controversial performance art, and a highly publicized 2004 sexual assault as signs that Chaucer's work remains vitally involved in American ideas of obscenity.
    • 11:45 am, Alumni Guest House

November 2010

Friday, November 5th
Thursday, November 4th
  • Dialogos II: Faculty Research Exchange
    • Dialogos II: Faculty Research Exchange, Exhibition as (no) place, Dana Strand, (French and Francophone Studies) Tarzan's (Post)colonial Misadventures at the Quai Branly; David Lefkowitz (Art and Art History,} Other Positioning Systems
    • 4:30 pm, Gould Library Athenaeum

October 2010

Friday, October 29th
Friday, October 22nd
Wednesday, October 20th
  • Flamenco Workshop with Susana di Palma
    • Flamenco Workshop with Susana di Palma. All are invited to participate—no experience necessary!
    • 5:00 pm, Cowling Dance Studio
  • Zorongo Flamenco Dancers
    • Susana di Palma has won international acclaim as one of the foremost flamenco dancers and choreographers in the world. Combining a passionate love for traditional Spanish flamenco with the creative choreographer’s spirit, she has mesmerized audiences on several continents. Her shows have been described as “ferocious, enigmatic, poignant” (The Seattle Times), with “a sense of humor and a clear idea of theater” (The Villager, New York).
    • 8:00 pm, Severance Great Hall
Friday, October 15th
Friday, October 8th
  • The Peace Corps and Globalization
    • A presentation by Jim Fisher, The John W. Nason Professor Emeritus of Anthropology, Carleton College. Bagels and coffee will be served.
    • 8:30 am, Leighton 330
Thursday, October 7th
  • Fall History Dept Herbert P. Lefler Talk, Dr. Kathleen Brown, U. Pennsylvania
    • We are delighted to announce that our History Department Fall Term Lefler speaker, Kathleen Brown, History Dept, U Penn, will present a talk on Thursday, October 7, at 5:00 p.m. in Leighton 304, "'Am I Not a Man and a Brother?' Anglo-American abolitionism and the concept of human rights." https://apps.carleton.edu/curricular/history/UpcomingEvents/ for more information.
    • 5:00 pm, Leighton 304
  • Visiting artist Ben Katchor: "Great Museum Cafeterias of the World"
    • An illustrated lecture on the design and culture of museum cafeterias. And examination of the work of Claude Curcilio, whose theory of the "veracious peek" was the first to explain the mysterious connection between art and museum cafeterias. The lecture includes an anecdotal survey and slide presentation of great museum cafeterias, past and present.
    • 7:30 pm, Boliou 104 (handicapped accessible)
Tuesday, October 5th
  • Dialogos: Faculty Research Exchange “Panoramic Images & Panoramic Consciousness”
    • Thanks to digital photography, panoramic photographs have become popular in the last decade. This talk explores the [remarkably radical] esthetics of the panorama as an image form, and traces its history back to the late 18th century. It argues that "panoramic consciousness"—the aspiration to immerse oneself in an image—may be one of the central driving forces in the evolution of visual media. Presenters: John Schott, James Woodward Strong Professor of the Liberal Arts. Discussants: Beth McKinsey, discussant, Professor of English and American Studies. Lunch provided for 50, available at 11:45 a.m.; presentation beginning at Noon.
    • 11:45 am, Alumni Guest House Meeting Room
  • Haiti - After the Earthquake
    • Rea Dol, Founder and Director of the SOPUDEP School near Port-au-Prince, will speak about the current situation in Haiti. Featured in the New York times as "The Mother Figure of Morne Lazarre," Ms. Dol has been leading Haitian efforts to reestablish normalcy after the earthquake. Hamline professor Max Adrien, also a Haitian native, will speak briefly about Haitian culture today, and student leaders of Haiti Relief will propose ways to help. Sponsored by the Humanities Center, Haitian Relief, and the Haiti Justice Alliance.
    • 4:00 pm, Boliou 104
Friday, October 1st

September 2010

Thursday, September 30th
  • Pierre Bayard: Second Faculty Seminar
    • A faculty seminar on the work of Pierre Bayard (with the author). Readings to be distributed in advance; discussion to be in English. Pierre Bayard, professor of French literature from Paris VIII, and author of How to Talk About Books You Haven't Read, as well as many other volumes of literary criticism, meets with interested faculty to discuss his work. Pierre Bayard is the Fred W. and Margaret C. Schuster Distinguished Visiting Lecturer in Literature, sponsored by the Department of French & Francophone Studies and the Department of English, with additional support from the Humanities Center at Carleton College and the Cultural Services of the Consulate General of France in Chicago
    • 4:30 pm, Sayles Hill Lounge
Tuesday, September 28th
  • Pierre Bayard: First Faculty Seminar
    • A faculty seminar on the work of Pierre Bayard (with the author). Readings to be distributed in advance; discussion to be in English. Pierre Bayard, professor of French literature from Paris VIII, and author of How to Talk About Books You Haven't Read, as well as many other volumes of literary criticism, meets with interested faculty to discuss his work. Pierre Bayard is the Fred W. and Margaret C. Schuster Distinguished Visiting Lecturer in Literature, sponsored by the Department of French & Francophone Studies and the Department of English, with additional support from the Humanities Center at Carleton College and the Cultural Services of the Consulate General of France in Chicago.
    • 4:30 pm, Sayles Hill Lounge
Monday, September 27th
  • Pierre Bayard: "Whodunnit? Shakespearean Murders and Detective Criticism"
    • Pierre Bayard, professor of French literature from Paris VIII, author of How to Talk About Books You Haven't Read, and inventor of "detective criticism" takes Shakespeare to task. Remember that rotten smell in Denmark? It may be the odor of red herrings. Pierre Bayard is the Fred W. and Margaret C. Schuster Distinguished Visiting Lecturer in Literature, sponsored by the Department of French & Francophone Studies and the Department of English, with additional support from the Humanities Center at Carleton College and the Cultural Services of the Consulate General of France in Chicago.
    • 4:30 pm, Boliou 104
  • Pierre Bayard Booksigning
    • Author Pierre Bayard will be signing copies of his book "How to Talk about Books You Haven't Read" following his presentation and discussion. Copies of his book will be available at the event as well as prior to the event in the Bookstore.
    • 5:30 pm, Boliou Hall, Room 104
Friday, September 24th
Thursday, September 23rd
Friday, September 17th

May 2010

Tuesday, May 11th
Monday, May 10th
Saturday, May 8th
Friday, May 7th
  • Christopher U. Light Lectureship Concert: Nicolas Collins, composer
    • Composer Nicolas Collins will present a concert of various works for slightly misused technology. Some of the pieces will employ musicians from the Carleton community. New York born and raised, Nicolas Collins studied composition with Alvin Lucier at Wesleyan University, worked for many years with David Tudor, and has collaborated with numerous soloist and ensembles around the world. He lived most of the 1990s in Europe, where he was Visiting Artistic Director of Stichting STEIM (Amsterdam), and a DAAD composer-in-residence in Berlin. Since 1997 he has been editor-in-chief of the Leonardo Music Journal, and since 1999 a Professor in the Department of Sound at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. The second edition of his book, Handmade Electronic Music – The Art of Hardware Hacking, was published by Routledge in 2009. Collins has the dubious distinction of having played at both CBGBs and the Concertgebouw.
    • 8:00 pm, Concert Hall
Wednesday, May 5th

April 2010

Thursday, April 29th
Tuesday, April 27th
  • Dialogos I: Faculty Research Exchange
    • Gould Library Athenaeum. Join us for lunch and a talk by Humberto Huergo, Professor of Spanish, "Photographic Theory in 1920s Madrid." John Schott, James Woodward Strong Professor of the Liberal Arts, will be the respondent and open the discussion.
Friday, April 23rd
Saturday, April 17th
  • Foro Latinoamericano: "Politics, Policy, and Mortality Decline in Chile: The Pinochet Paradox"
    • James W. McGuire is professor in the Department of Government at Wesleyan University. He specializes in comparative politics with a regional focus on Latin America and East Asia and a topical focus on democracy and public health. He is the author of Peronism without Perón: Unions, Parties, and Democracy in Argentina (Stanford, 1997) and of Wealth, Health, and Democracy in East Asia and Latin America (Cambridge, 2010). Professor McGuire is a recipient of Wesleyan's Binswanger Prize for Excellence in Teaching.
    • 9:30 am, Gould Library Athenaeum
  • Foro Latinoamericano: "Inequality and Extra-parliamentary Politics in an Era of Democracy"
    • Moises Arce, Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of Missouri. He received his Ph.D. in 2000 from the University of New Mexico. His primary research interests are in the areas of the politics of market transitions and contentious politics. His current research examines the changing basis of antigovernment mobilizations against economic liberalization in Latin America. He is the author of Market Reform in Society (Penn State, 2005)and several articles in leading journals of political science.
    • 10:30 am, Gould Library Athenaeum
  • Foro Latinoamericano: "Roundtable discussion on the Neoliberal Agenda Reconsidered"
    • The roundtable wil include Foro guest speakers, faculty and students.
    • 11:30 am, Gould Library Athenaeum
Friday, April 16th
  • Foro Latinoamericano: "Four Decades of Living on the Edge: The Favelas in Rio de Janeiro"
    • Janice Perlman’s book, FAVELA:Four Decades of Living on the Edge in Rio de Janeiro,has just been published by Oxford University Press. She has received Guggenheim, Fulbright and C. Wright Mills Awards. She is founder and President of Mega-Cities, a global nonprofit sharing urban innovations. She was a professor of City and Regional Planning at UC Berkeley and has taught at the Fundacao Getulio Vargas, IBAM and Federal University in Rio de Janeiro.
    • 5:30 pm, Gould Library Athenaeum
Wednesday, April 14th
Tuesday, April 13th
  • Bassekou Kouyate and Ngoni Ba
    • Malian sensation Bassekou Kouyaté and his award-winning band of ngoni players will rock Great Hall. Come learn about and experience this quintessentially West African instrument that is the forerunner of the American banjo. Sponsored by the Humanities Center, African and African American Studies, Committee for the Study of the Arts, and Special Projects.
    • 8:00 pm, Great Hall
Tuesday, April 6th
Monday, April 5th
Friday, April 2nd
  • ELEEMOSYNARY
    • by Lee Blessing. This is a comps production for Kristen Johnson, Liliana Dominguez, and Chasya Hill. Rachel Simon directs. ELEEMOSYNARY dramatizes the lives of three women in three generations of an extraordinary family.
    • 8:00 pm, Arena Theater

February 2010

Thursday, February 25th
  • Post- Katrina Symposium---New Orleans, Katrina, and the Road to Recovery: Three Perspectives
    • On Thursday, February 25 from 5-6:45 p.m. in Boliou 104, Carleton College, three speakers—Rosanne Adderley, Associate Professor of History, Tulane University; John Bardes, '08 (history), teacher, Arthur Ashe Charter School, New Orleans; and Kimberly Smith, Associate Professor, Political Science and Environmental Studies, Carleton College— reflect on the impact of Hurricane Katrina on New Orleans and the city's road to recovery. Michael Hemesath, professor of economics, and organizer of two post-Katrina Carleton service trips to the Gulf Coast, will be the moderator.
    • 5:00 pm, Boliou 104
Saturday, February 20th
Friday, February 19th
  • Gary Wynia Memorial Lecture
    • Professor G. Eduardo Silva, Professor and Chair, Department of Political Science: Research Fellow, Center for International Studies is the 2010 Gary Wynia Memorial Lecturer. "Challenging Neoliberalism in Latin America"
    • 4:30 pm, Gould Libary Athenaeum
  • Carleton Players present - ANGELS IN AMERICA PART ONE: MILLENNIUM APPROACHES
    • Carleton Players present Tony Kushner's ANGELS IN AMERICA PART ONE: MILLENNIUM APPROACHES directed by David Wiles. FOR RESERVATIONS CALL: 507-222-4471.
    • 8:00 pm, Arena Theater
Thursday, February 18th
Wednesday, February 17th
  • Dialogos 2: Faculty Research Exchange: Tragedy and Contending Truths
    • Tragedy and Contending Truths Wednesday, February 17 – 4:30 p.m., Gould Library Athenaeum Angela Curran, Assistant Professor of Philosophy, "Aristotle on Tragic Truth and the Emotions" Clara Hardy, Professor of Classical Languages, "Tragic Rhetoric: Contending Truths in Euripides' Trojan Women," Moderator: Timothy Raylor, Professor of English
    • 4:30 pm, Gould Library Athenaeum
Tuesday, February 16th
Friday, February 12th
  • Congressman Keith Ellison
    • "The American Public's Encounter with One Muslim and One Muslim's Encounter with American Political Life: Reflections by Congressman Keith Ellison"
    • 4:00 pm, Great Hall

January 2010

Tuesday, January 26th
  • Lucia, a film by Humberto Solas
    • This 1968 film charts women’s roles during three periods in Cuban history. It will be introduced by Carol Donelan, associate professor of Cinema and Media Studies and Yansi Perez, assistant professor of Spanish.
    • 7:00 pm, Boliou Hall, room 104
Tuesday, January 19th
  • Dialogos 1: Faculty Research Exchange: Rembrandt's Male Nudes
    • "Rembrandt's Male Nudes" - Humanities Center Faculty Seminar Alison Kettering, William R. Kenan, Jr. Professor of Art History, will present her work on Rembrandt's Male Nudes, which have been rarely studies (and she has theories about why this is the case!). Commentors: Carol Donelan, Associate Professor Cinema and Media Studies and Seth Greenberg, Benedict Distinguished Visiting Professor of Psychology Sponsored by the Humanities Center.
    • 12:00 pm, Alumni Guest House
  • Jewish Thought and Letters Reading Group
    • Opening to faculty, staff and students of both Carleton and St. Olaf Colleges Dates and topics are listed in Full Event Information
    • 5:00 pm, Headley House
Wednesday, January 13th

November 2009

Monday, November 9th
  • "Popular Sex and Popular Culture"
    • HOLT PARKER, University of Cincinnati, an award-winning classicist specializing in Gender Studies, Literary Theory, Augustan Poetry, Greek Lyric Poetry, Roman Comedy, Linguistics. Sponsored by the Humanities Center.
    • 3:30 pm, Gould Library Athenaeum
Wednesday, November 4th
  • An Evening with Keith Harrison
    • Keith, along with Jackson, will read from Now and Then, Inland Songs and Poems. This will be an evening of singing as well as reading. Keith Harrison, an internationally known poet, was a Professor of English and Writer in Residence at Carleton from 1968 to 1996. He taught beginning and advanced Crafts of Writing Poetry and experimental classes in poetry recitation. A recent book of poems, entitled Changes: New and Collected Poems, 1959-2002, was published in 2002 by the Black Willow Press. He will teach a class in advanced essay writing at Carleton during the second five weeks of Fall Term. Jackson Bryce is the Marjorie Crabb Garbisch Professor of Classical Languages and the Liberal Arts and Senior Lecturer in Bassoon at Carleton. His interests are in Roman literature and history (especially of the Christian era). Jack began teaching at Carleton in 1972.
    • 7:00 pm, Gould Library Atheaneum
Monday, November 2nd
  • "War Work: Artists Address Iraq and Other Wars"
    • Bearing Witness after Abu Ghraib: Perspectives from an Artist and a Human Rights Lawyer Daniel Heyman, Philadelphia-based artist; Katherine Gallagher, lawyer, Center for Constitutional Rights, New York.
    • 7:00 pm, Gould Library Atheaneum

October 2009

Friday, October 30th
  • "Escribir desde la frontera" (in Spanish with English Translation provided)
    • Najat el Hachmi studied Arab literature at the University of Barcelona and currently resides in Granollers. Author of the autobiographical Jo també sóc catalana (I too am Catalan, 2004), she won the most prestigious award in Catalan letters, the Ramon Llull prize, for her novel L'últim patriarca (The Last Patriarch), 2008.
    • 5:00 pm, Gould Library Athenaeum
  • William Shakespeare's "Measure for Measure"
    • William Shakespeare’s, Measure for Measure, directed by Ruth Weiner, will be performed by the Carleton Players. Play runs October 30, 31 and November 7, 8
    • 8:00 pm, Arena Theater
Thursday, October 22nd
Wednesday, October 21st
Thursday, October 8th
  • The Broom Lecture in the American Demographic Experience Series
    • Julian Bond, Professor of History at the American University and the University of Virginia. The inaugural speaker in The Broom Lecture in the American Demographic Experience series, Dr. Bond served from 1998 until recently as Chairman of the Board of the NAACP, the oldest and largest civil rights organization in the United States. He was also first president of the Southern Poverty Law Center and a co-founder with Morris Dees and Joseph J. Levin, Jr. Professor Bond has a long history as an activist for social justice and peace.
    • 12:00 pm, Concert Hall
  • Animals as Subjects andObjects: Hunting and Husbandry in Early Modern Europe
    • Professor Marcy Norton, George Washington University, specialist in Atlantic World and Latin American History.
    • 5:00 pm, Leighton 304
  • Thomas Jefferson, Libraries and Enlightenment
    • Frank Shuffelton, Professor Emeritus, University of Rochester, a specialist in the literature of the Revolutionary Era and the early republic, is the editor of the Cambridge Companion to Thomas Jefferson.
    • 7:00 pm, Boliou 104
Wednesday, October 7th
  • "La Crónica Modernista en Centroamérica" (in Spanish)
    • Ricardo Roque Baldovinos, Professor of Literature, Communications and Journalism at the Central American University (UCS) en El Salvador. He directed the prestigious journal "Cultura" en El Salvador, between 1997-1999. His books include "Arte y Parte: ensayos de literature, The Collected Narrative Works of Salarrué" (editor) and of "Tensiones de la Modernidad en Centroamérica" (co-editor with Valeria Grinberg-Pla).
    • 5:00 pm, Gould Library Athenaeum
Tuesday, October 6th
  • Reading Group
    • Pierre Bayard's "How to Talk About Books You Haven't Read." Reading group led by Scott Carpenter, Professor of French Second meeting on October 20 at 4:00pm
    • 4:00 pm, Hill Lounge
Monday, October 5th

September 2009

Friday, September 25th
Friday, September 18th

May 2009

Thursday, May 21st
  • Crusade and Aftermath, Living with a Holy War, 1095-1125, followed by Public Reception!
    • Jay Rubenstein, '89, Associate Professor of History & Headley Distinguished Visitor-in-Residence. His visit is being supported by the Class of 1957 Revolving Lectureship Fund, established by the Class on the occasion of their 30th Reunion. RECEPTION IN HISTORY DEPARTMENT LOUNGE following event - refreshments will be served! EVERYONE WELCOME!
    • 5:00 pm, Leighton 304
Friday, May 15th
Thursday, May 14th
Wednesday, May 13th
  • Dialogos 2: Faculty Research Exchange
    • “Migration, Immigration, Hybridity” Wednesday, May 13 – 4:30 p.m. Gould Library Athenaeum. Anna Moltchanova, Associate Professor of Philosophy: “The General Will and Immigration.” Carolyn Wong, Assistant Professor of Political Science: “Becoming Citizens: Political Engagement and Inclusion of the Hmong in America.” William North, Associate Professor of History and European Studies, Moderator. Reception immediately following.
    • 4:30 pm, Gould Library Athenaeum
Friday, May 8th
  • European identity: reality, fiction... or both?
    • José Ovejero will be on campus to do a Creative Writing Workshop as well as this talk. He is a prestigious Spanish Writer and the Headley House Distinguished Visitor-in Residence.
    • 4:30 pm, Gould Library Atheaneum
  • Teatro del Pueblo's "Help Wanted"
    • Teatro del Pueblo, a Latino company based in Saint Paul, will present a short play "Help Wanted," depicting a landmark case in which the human rights of undocumented workers were trampled on and eventually redeemed. In English with some Spanish. Discussion with cast members will follow. The event is free, and the general public is invited to attend. For more information, contact Cathy Yandell at 507.222.4245 or cyandell@carleton.edu.
    • 8:00 pm, Great Hall

April 2009

Friday, April 24th
  • Christopher U. Light Lectureship Concert "The String Quartets of Jefferson Friedman" Chiara Quartet
    • Playing "Chamber Music in Any Chamber," the Chiara Quartet expands the spaces for quartet music, reaching from the concert hall into clubs, bars, and galleries, but always returning chamber music to its roots. Described by the Seattle Post-Intelligencer as "vastly talented, vastly resourceful, and vastly committed to the music of their time," the quartet is also continually searching for new meaning within the well-established quartet canon. Their style is best described as a nonstop journey along the edges of expressive possibility: "luminous," "searing," (New York Times) "soulful," "biting," and possessing a "potent collective force" (Strings Magazine).
    • 8:00 pm, Concert Hall
Thursday, April 23rd
Tuesday, April 21st
  • Byzantine Churches excavated in Petra by Acor
    • Barbara Porter, Director of the American Center for Oriental Research (ACOR) in Amman, Jordan, will give an Edward L. Wiesl. Jr. Lecture. Barbara holds a Ph.D. in archaeology from Columbia and is a specialist in Middle Eastern archaeology.
    • 5:00 pm, Boliou 104
Wednesday, April 15th
  • Dialogos - Faculty Research Exchange
    • 12:00 pm, Gould Library Athenaeum
  • Beauty and Love: A Video Screening
    • Video screening of a modern dance interpretation of Beauty and Love, a Sufi mystical poem in the Mevlevi (Rumi) tradition. Following the half-hour video, Professor Walter Andrews, a distinguished Ottoman scholar from the University of Washington, will lead a discussion with the audience. Professor Andrews's most recent book is The Age of Beloveds: Love and the Beloved in Early Modern Ottoman and European Culture and Society, With Mehmet Kalpaklı, Duke University Press, 2005. Sponsored by the Humanities Center, Religion, and Theater and Dance. Mediterranean reception immediately following the discussion.
    • 4:30 pm, Gould Library Athenaeum
Monday, April 6th

March 2009

Thursday, March 12th

February 2009

Friday, February 27th
Monday, February 16th
  • Paul Bogard speaking on "The Story of Night"
    • Paul Bogard '89 will speak on protecting the night sky and the overuse of artificial lights. To quote Professor Bogard, "Anyone who has ever marveled at a dark, starry night knows that the night sky above our cities and suburbs is a pale version of what it used to be." A reception and book signing will follow.
    • 7:00 pm, The Athenaeum, Gould Library
Tuesday, February 10th

January 2009

Thursday, January 29th
Tuesday, January 27th
Thursday, January 15th

October 2008

Wednesday, October 22nd
Friday, October 17th
  • Aquila Theatre Company presents The Iliad
    • Homer's epic story of Achilles and the Trojan War is one of the greatest works in world literature. Aquila's innovative production, under Peter Meineck, Producing Artistic Director, tells the main parts of the story in an action packed performance. Free and open to the public.
    • 7:30 pm, Concert Hall
Wednesday, October 15th
Monday, October 13th
Thursday, October 9th
  • Marjorie Welish Reading her Poetry
    • Marjorie Welish, poet, art critic, and teacher, will read a selection of her poems. A reception and refreshments will follow the reading.
    • 4:30 pm, The Athenaeum, Gould Library
Wednesday, October 1st

October 2007

Wednesday, October 10th