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Sandra Teitge: On Dance Constructions, Plastic, and Public Collections

New York-based critic lectures on contemporary dance in museums, providing context to FELT ROOM in the Perlman Teaching Museum.

Date: Thursday, January 19th, 2017

Time: 6:00 pm

Duration: 1 hour

Location: Perlman Teaching Museum, Kaemmer Family Gallery

Contact: Laurel Bradley

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Sandra Teitge is an East Berlin-born, New York-based independent curator/programmer, writer, and researcher and artistic director of the residency program FD13 in Saint Paul, MN/U.S. 

Teitge's presentation provides context for FELT ROOM, a dance installation and work in progress in the Perlman Teaching Museum. FELT ROOM, designed by Olive Bieringa of BodyCartography Project, is a collaboration with the Carleton Dance Program. FELT ROOM will be performed multiple times, including from 7-9 pm immediately after Teitge's lecture. 

More on the lecture:  

On Dance Constructions, Plastic, and Public Collections: female minds & bodies in museums

Since the early 2000s, an increasing number of museums have incorporated performance into their structures, envisioning a looser, more vibrant ambiance – perhaps motivated by a level of boredom with stagnant objects. Historically, the visual arts have always been the most open and interested in other genres and their appropriation, for the better or the worst. They have succeeded in attracting and convincing contemporary dancers to leave the conventional theater space with its divided stage-audience structure behind and enter a shared space where audience and the objects on view coexist. In a performance, the objects, usually permanent and material, become time-based and immaterial — to the great interest of the museums.

For by now more than a decade in Europe with perhaps an already inflationary troupe of French choreographers, such as Xavier le Roy and Boris Charmatz, and before that as early as in the 1960s in New York around the Judson Dance Theater, dancers have attempted to redefine and challenge the role of the dancer as well as the time and space of dance performances in general by bringing dance into the museum, the showcase for the visual arts.