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Curatorial Seminar Exhibitions

  • A Collection Embodied

    A Collection Embodied (2014)

    Students enrolled in the Fall 2014 “Curatorial Studies” seminar mined the Carleton Art Collection for figurative works that articulate the human condition and embody identity, social connections, political allegiances, and notions of beauty.
  • <strong>Sun Young Kang</strong><br />
<em>The Way to Be Empty</em>, 2006

    Radical Messages, Revolutionary Means (2010)

    This exhibition draws from the Gould Library Special Collections and was curated by a group of students enrolled in a curatorial practices seminar taught by Laurel Bradley. The Special Collections, containing over 450 artists’ books, focuses on objects with pedagogical utility in a Liberal Arts College context, for academic disciplines from Art and Art History to English, Astronomy and History.
  • Whistler, <em>Sketching no. 1</em>

    Whistler Circles (2008)

    A student-curated exhibition exploring the etchings of James McNeill Whistler and his followers, showcasing 19th- and early 20th-century works from the Etching Revival. Ranging from touristic scenes of pastoral landscapes and famous monuments to avant-garde aesthetic works nearing abstraction, this exhibition presents scenes of rural and urban European life during a time of transformation.
  • New Art, New Ideas: Students Curate the Collection

    New Art, New Ideas (2006)

    New Art, New Ideas is an exciting journey through Carleton’s little-known art collection. Addressing the potential uses of visual art in a college setting, the six student curators hope to make accessible works of art from local, regional, and internationally known artists. Whether it is ethically challenging, Carleton-related, intercultural, beautiful, or something completely different, art plays a major role in life at Carleton.
  • Thomas Hart Benton

    American Scenes Between the Wars (2003)

    During winter term 2003, a team of four Carleton students organized this exhibition and complementary events. Featuring works from the Carleton art collection, the exhibition also presents prints borrowed from the Flaten Art Museum, St. Olaf College; the Hillstrom Museum, Gustavus Adolphus College; the Weisman Art Museum, University of Minnesota; and the Minnesota Historical Society.