Kudos

  • Goering publishes article in Gastronomica

    January 3, 2018 at 4:52 pm

     

    Laura Goering, Professor of Russian, published an article entitled "Marketing Soviet Nostalgia: The Many Faces of Buratino" in Gastronomica, The Journal of Critical Food Studies. The article appeared in a special issue commemorating the 100th anniversary of the Russian Revolution. 

  • Cornejo screens new short film

    January 3, 2018 at 4:50 pm

    Cecilia Cornejo , Instructor in Cinema and Media Studies, screened her short film encuentro ~ now that "whole" is always "in-between," at the Feminist Video Quarterly #8. The screening featured works by emerging and established Latinx/Xicanx/Indigenous artists and was held on December 7 at Electric Machete Studios in St. Paul.

  • Laurence Cooper, Professor of Political Science, has been awarded a National Endowment for the Humanities Fellowship to support work on a book-length study of Jean-Jacques Rousseau's crowning work, The Reveries of the Solitary Walker. Rousseau's Reveries articulate the meaning, requirements, and expressions of the philosophic life, a life that Rousseau deemed the most choiceworthy life for a human being but also a deeply problematic one. The most daunting demand of the philosophic life, and the focus of the Reveries' dramatic narrative, is the need to overcome certain fiercely held moral passions and prejudices. The NEH project title is "Virtue is Knowledge, and Other Demoralizing Thoughts: Rousseau's Reveries." The provisional book title is "Dreaming of Justice, Waking to Wisdom." Cooper's fellowship is one of just 74 awarded this year, only 12 of which went to faculty at liberal arts colleges. The NEH received approximately 1,100 applications.

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    Deborah Appleman, Hollis L. Caswell Professor of Educational Studies, recently presented two papers at the National Council of Teachers of English Annual Convention in St. Louis. She also presented at the annual meeting of the Literacy Research Association. In addition, Professor Appleman gave two invited talks at Stanford University's Graduate School of Education and for the College of Education at the University of Minnesota.

  • Laurence Cooper receives NEH Fellowship

    December 13, 2017 at 11:32 am

    Laurence Cooper, Laurence CooperProfessor of Political Science, has been awarded a National Endowment for the Humanities Fellowship to support work on a book-length study of Jean-Jacques Rousseau's crowning work, The Reveries of the Solitary Walker. Rousseau's Reveries articulate the meaning, requirements, and expressions of the philosophic life, a life that Rousseau deemed the most choiceworthy life for a human being but also a deeply problematic one. The most daunting demand of the philosophic life, and the focus of the Reveries' dramatic narrative, is the need to overcome certain fiercely held moral passions and prejudices. NEH logoThe provisional title of Cooper's book is Dreaming of Justice, Waking to Wisdom. Cooper's fellowship is one of just 74 awarded this year, only twelve of which went to faculty at liberal arts colleges. The NEH received approximately 1,100 applications.

  • Kimberly Smith, professor of environmental studies and political science, has been awarded a William Nelson Cromwell Foundation Grant to support archival research for her book project "The Conservation Constitution: The Conservation Movement and Constitutional Change, 1870-1930." Her book examines the impact of the Progressive Era conservation movement on constitutional doctrine, explaining the role of the judiciary in creating the constitutional foundations of the modern environmental regulatory regime.

  • Deborah Gross, professor of chemistry, presented a talk at the American Association for Aerosol Research annual meeting in Raleigh, North Carolina, in October, entitled "Chemical Composition of Particle Emissions from Clean Cookstoves" with co-authors Tsegaye Nega, associate professor of environmental studies, and Clarissa Smith '19. At the same conference,  Smith won a student poster award for her poster, entitled "Aerosol Particle Emissions and Efficiency of Cookstove Prototypes for Use in Ethiopia," which included the same co-authors.

  • Kathleen Galotti, the William H. Laird Professor of Cognitive Science, and former students Anna Smith '17, Carl Bou Mansour '15, and Michael Schneekloth '15, recently presented a poster at the 58th Annual Meeting of the Psychonomic Society in Vancouver, Canada. The presentation was entitled, "Poké Balls and Gym Brawls: Ways of Knowing and Learning Pokémon Go." 

  • Kathy Evertz, director of the academic support center, and two writing center consultants, Brynne Diggins '19 and Avery Naughton '18, presented "Tutor Preparation: Intelligence from the Front Lines" at the International Writing Centers Association in Chicago on November 12. They discussed the results of an international survey of undergraduate writing consultants.

  • Ken Abrams, associate professor of psychology, published a paper co-authored with Sam Krimmel '15, Stacey Johnson '15, Kate Cieslowski '15Helen Strnad '14, Arielle Melum '14, and Caroline Kryder '14. The paper, "Nicotine deprivation attenuates panic reactivity in smokers: Findings from a placebo-controlled nicotine patch study," is published in the journal Depression and Anxiety.

  • Faculty trio attends leadership institute

    November 20, 2017 at 1:24 pm

    Marty Baylor, associate professor of physics; Sarah Meerts, associate professor of psychology; and Matt Whited, associate professor of chemistry, attended the PKAL STEM Leadership Institute in Adamstown, Maryland, in July.  Founded in 1996, the PKAL STEM Leadership Institute offers more than 20 years of experience in leadership development for STEM faculty. The Institute is designed for both early- and mid-career STEM faculty engaged in leading projects aimed at transforming undergraduate STEM education in their classrooms, departments, and institutions. The five-day intensive Institute provides faculty participants with the theory and practice required to effectively manage the politics of change and contribute to the national STEM higher education reform effort.