Skip Navigation
Jenny Bourne

Jenny Bourne

  • Raymond Plank Professor of Incentive Economics, Chair of Economics, Economics

Education & Professional History

Indiana University, AB; University of Chicago, MA, PhD.

At Carleton since 1997.

Highlights & Recent Activity

In Essentials, Unity:  An Economic History of the Granger Movement

The Bondsman's Burden:  An Economic Analysis of the Common Law of Southern Slavery

An Economic Approach to Law (3 vol)

 

 

More Than They Realize: The Income of the Wealthy and Wealth Concentration (in progress)

The Other America:  Inequality, Taxes, and the Very Rich (in progress)

A Stone of Hope:  The Civil Rights Act of 1964 and Its Effects on Black Americans

When Johnny Came Marching Home Again, What Did He Find?  A Look at the Postbellum Economy

We Are Coming, Father Abraham, But How Will You Pay For Us? 

To Slip the Surly Bonds of State Rights and Form a More Perfect (Financial) Union:  One Legacy of the 37th Congress 

Over the Top:  How Estate Tax Returns Show That The Very Rich Are Different From You and Me 

New Wine in an Old Bottle:  How Minnesota's Receivership Statute Can Promote Both Efficiency and Equity

Double Take:  Abolition and The Size of Transferred Property Rights

Dred, Panic, War:  How a Slave Case Triggered Financial Crisis and Civil Disunion

Give Lincoln Credit:  How Paying for the Civil War Transformed the U.S. Financial System

How Broad Liberal Arts Training Produces Ph.D. Economists:  Carleton's Story (with Nathan Grawe)

Edith Wharton as Economist:  An Economic Interpretation of The House of Mirth and The Age of Innocence

Blacks, Whites, and Brown:  Effects on the Earnings of Men and Their Sons (with Nathan Grawe)

Riches to Riches:  The Importance of Intergenerational Transfers on Wealth Distribution

Protecting the Wolf in Sheep's Clothing:  Perverse Consequences of McKennon

Fraudulent Conveyance Law and Leveraged Buyouts:  Remedy or Insurance Policy?

Workers' Compensation and Disability Discrimination after the Americans with Disabilities Act:  Sorting Out The Rights and Duties

Tax Expenditure Review Report:  Bringing Tax Expenditures into the Budget Process

A Bigger Bang for the Public Buck:  Achieving Efficiency and Equity in Higher Education

Oil Slickers:  How Taxpayers Subsidize Petroleum

Taxation of Foreign Exchange Gains and Losses and The Tax Reform Act of 1986

 

 

 

 

Organizations & Scholarly Affiliations

American Economic Association

Economic History Association

Midwest Economic Association (Vice President)

Panel Member, SOI Consultants, Internal Revenue Service

Panel Member, Tax Expenditure Review Study Group, State of Minnesota

 

Personal Interests

As Listed on Department Faculty Pages

Economics

Jenny Bourne (Ph.D. University of Chicago) has previously held positions at St. Olaf College, George Mason University, and the U.S. Treasury Department. She has published in the areas of American economic history, demography, tax policy, and law. Her book on the economics of slave law was published by Cambridge University Press; her book on the economic history of the Grange movement was published in January 2017 by Ohio University Press.  Her current research includes an analysis of wealth concentration and returns to capital across wealth groups, an investigation of taxes paid across wealth groups, the effects of the Civil War on the postbellum economy, and the impact of Civil-War finance on financial and governmental institutions.  Jenny is a member of the Statistics of Income Consultants’ Panel at the Internal Revenue Service and she served on the Tax Expenditure Review Study Group for the State of Minnesota (2010-11).  She teaches courses in labor economics, law and economics, American economic history, economics of race, public finance, price theory, and microeconomic principles.

Africana Studies

Jenny Bourne is Raymond Plank Professor of Economics and Chair of the Economics Department. She received her A.B. summa cum laude from Indiana University and her M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of Chicago. Before joining the faculty at Carleton, Jenny taught at St. Olaf College and worked as an international tax economist at the U.S. Treasury’s Office of Tax Analysis. Jenny teaches intermediate price theory, intermediate and advanced labor economics, law and economics, American economic history, economics of the public sector, economics of race, and principles of microeconomics. Her book on the economics of Southern slave law, The Bondsman’s Burden, was published by Cambridge University Press in 1998.  http://books.google.com/books?id=wP1cwhocZ5IC&printsec=frontcover&source=gbs_ge_summary_r&cad=0.  She has published articles in the Journal of Economic History, Social Science History, National Tax Journal, American Journal of Legal History, Social Science Quarterly, and several other economics journals and law reviews. Among her recent publications are: “Give Lincoln Credit: How Paying for the Civil War Transformed the U.S. Financial System” (Albany Government Law Review), “Blacks, Whites, and Brown: Effects on the Earnings of Men and Their Sons” (Journal of African American Studies, with Nathan Grawe), “Edith Wharton as Economist:  An Economic Interpretation of The House of Mirth and The Age of Innocence” (The Edith Wharton Review),  “New Wine in an Old Bottle:  How Minnesota’s Receivership Statute Can Promote Both Efficiency and Equity” (Hamline Law Review), “Stay East, Young Man? Economic Effects of the Dred Scott Decision” (Chicago-Kent Law Review), and In Essentials, Unity:  An Economic History of the Granger Movement (Ohio University Press). Jenny authored the chapter “The Economics of Slavery” in the recently published Encyclopedia of Law and Economics (Edward Elgar) http://www.e-elgar.com/bookimages/47205658.gif, as well as the chapter “The Economic History of Slavery” in Handbook of Modern Economic History (Routledge). She will have a chapter entitled “We Are Coming, Father Abraham, But How Will You Pay For Us?,” in the forthcoming issue of U.S. Capitol Historical Society Papers (Ohio University Press).  She has served as an expert lecturer on race in American history under a Teaching American History grant and as co-director of a workshop series on the law of slavery at the Gilder-Lehrman Center at Yale University.   Her current research includes an analysis of wealth concentration and returns to capital across wealth groups, an investigation of taxes paid across wealth groups, and the effects of the Civil War on the postbellum economy. 

 

Profile updated July 25, 2017

What is this?

Carleton Faculty, Staff, and Student Profiles give Carls a simple way to communicate their interests and activity to the general public and the campus community. Read more about Carleton Profiles or sign in to view and edit your own profile.