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Hans Wietzke

Hans Wietzke ’03

  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Classics, Classics

Introduction

This year Hans is teaching courses on geographical traditions between antiquity and modernity, the ancient epic, and intermediate Greek and Latin. He received his PhD in Classics from Stanford University in 2015 and taught last year at Trinity University in San Antonio. He has been awarded fellowships from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the Dan David Foundation, and the Stanford Program in the History and Philosophy of Science. A philologist by training, Hans is broadly interested in the textual practices that make up Greek and Roman knowledge traditions. His current book project, Knowledge in Person, investigates the authorial persona and how it shaped the organization of knowledge in antiquity, and articles-in-progress explore "styles" of ancient geography and the importance of dedicating a text in ancient scientific writing.

Hans is also active in the modern performance of ancient drama and has co-directed, acted in, and co-translated productions of Aristophanes, Plautus, and Euripides with Stanford Classics in Theater.

Education & Professional History

Carleton College, BA; University of Oxford, MPhil; Stanford University, PhD.

At Carleton since 1999.

Highlights & Recent Activity

2017. “The public face of expertise: utility, zeal and collaboration in Ptolemy’s Syntaxis,” in Authority and Expertise in Ancient Scientific Culture, eds. Jason König and Greg Woolf. Cambridge University Press.

2017. “Strabo’s expendables: the function and aesthetics of minor authority,” in The Routledge Companion to Strabo, ed. Daniela Dueck. Routledge.

2016. “A fashionable curiosity: Claudius Ptolemy’s ‘desire for knowledge’ in literary context,” in Cultures of Mathematics and Logic, eds. Shier Ju, Benedikt Loewe, Thomas Mueller, and Yun Xie. Springer.

As Listed on Department Faculty Pages

Profile updated August 15, 2017

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