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Michael McNally

Michael McNally ’85

  • John M. and Elizabeth W. Musser Professor of Religious Studies, Chair of Religion, Religion

Education & Professional History

Carleton College, BA; Harvard Divinity School, MDiv; Harvard University, AM, PhD.

At Carleton since 2001.

Highlights & Recent Activity

Major Grants:

John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Fellowship

Mellon New Directions Fellowship

National Endowment for the Humanities Sabbatical Fellowship and Summer Stipend

American Philosophical Society Sabbatical Fellowship

Books:

Honoring Elders: Aging, Authority, and Ojibwe Religion (Columbia U. Press, 2009)

Ojibwe Singers: Hymns, Grief and a Native Culture in Motion (Oxford U. Press, 2000; repr. MN Historical Soc. Press, 2009)

ed., Art of Tradition: Sacred Story, Song, and Dance of Michigan's Anishinaabeg (Michigan State University Press, 2009)

Courses Taught This Year

As Listed on Department Faculty Pages

Religion

Michael D. McNally (Carleton, B.A.; Harvard Univ., M.Div., M.A., Ph.D.), 2001-, teaches courses in American religion and culture and Native American religious traditions. His special interests include the tradition and history of Minnesota's Anishinaabe/Ojibwe community, Native American Christianity, and lived religion in America. He is author of Honoring Elders: Aging, Authority, and Ojibwe Religion (2009), Ojibwe Singers: Hymns, Grief, and a Native Culture in Motion (2000), editor of Art of Tradition: Sacred Story, Song, and Dance among Michigan's Anishinaabe (2009), and a number of book chapters and journal articles. His current research project explores the intersection between Native American traditions, the category of "religion", and various facets of the law.

American Studies

B.A., Carleton; M.A., M.Div., and Ph.D., Harvard University

Michael McNally teaches courses in American religion and culture and Native American religious traditions. His special interests include the tradition and history of Minnesota's Anishinaabe Ojibwe community, Native American Christianity, and lived religion in America. He is author of Ojibwe Singers: Hymns, Grief, and a Native Culture in Motion (2000), editor of Art of Tradition: Sacred Story, Song, and Dance among Michigan's Anishinaabe (2006), and a number of book chapters and journal articles. His current research projects explore, on the one hand, aging, eldership, and religion in the Ojibwe tradition, and on the other explore the intersection between law, "religion," and Native American traditions.

Profile updated May 20, 2017

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