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Posts tagged with “Alumni” (All posts)

  • Fema Rostam Mohammad

    All That Remains

    Photojournalist Sebastian Meyer ’02 spent six weeks in northern Iraq documenting the daily life of Kurdish villagers who are determined to survive in a homeland haunted by ghosts of a violent past.

  • Emily Levine '05

    Living the Dream

    From a yurt in Alaska to a chicken coop in Missouri, Carls are embracing lifestyles that challenge the myth that more is better.

  • Doug Kenshol '89

    Corps Values

    In recognition of the Peace Corps’s 50th anniversary, we asked Carls who have served in the organization over the past five decades to tell us how their experiences have challenged and shaped them.

  • Olive Trees (Vincent van Gogh)

    Top Ten

    David Letterman and Time magazine have Top 10 lists, so why not us? We asked Carls to count to 10 on a variety of topics from best gadgets to favorite blogs. 

  • Cleaves Bennett '55

    The Encore Years

    With our increasing longevity—and declining economy—traditional retirement has become a thing of the past. We talk to Carls who are finding new careers, opportunities, and meaning in the second half of life.

  • solar energy illustration

    This Will Make You Feel Better

    Despite all the negative predictions from naysayers, our world really isn’t going to hell in a handbasket. We have some good news for you to ponder instead.

  • cocooning

    Fact Finders

    Politicians often make claims that make us wonder, “How do they get away with such big fibs?” Carleton experts share their take on how the average citizen can uncover the truth in the midst of so much mudslinging. Plus, we compile a list of fact-checking websites you should bookmark.

  • Serengeti National Park

    Into Africa

    Dennis Rentsch ’02 first fell in love with Tanzania on a study-abroad program. Today, he works and lives in the Serengeti, where he helps the expanding human population learn how to coexist with endangered wildlife.

  • Christiane Mack '87

    In Vogue

    As director of editorial development and operations, Christiane Mack ’87 protects and promotes Vogue’s global brand in a digital age.

  • Don't take cookies from strangers

    Don't Take Cookies from Strangers

    If the head of the CIA can’t keep his e-mails private, what hope do you have? As tracking technology improves, your online activity and personal data are increasingly at risk. Learn what you can do to protect your privacy.

  • Algol board, 1892

    Carleton Quips

    Our favorites from a weekly Facebook contest, in which Carls write captions for historic photos from the Carleton Archives.

  • Community of Peace Academy

    How to Teach Peace

    At Community of Peace Academy charter school in St. Paul, four Carls are using the national PeaceBuilders curriculum to help students succeed academically and personally.

  • Carleton's wind turbine

    Bragging Rights

    Midwestern modesty has kept us from blowing our own horn for too long. Here’s what makes Carleton one of the best liberal arts colleges in the country—and we’re not afraid to brag. A little.

  • Iditarod 2013

    Northern Exposure

    Three alumni journalists tell Alaska’s unique stories through print, radio, and photography.

  • NASCAR

    Lap Leader

    As NASCAR’s vice president for strategic development, Eric Nyquist ’94 is driving the company’s efforts to build its audience through new media and environmental initiatives.

  • Yemeni street singer

    Beauty Contest

    It’s not as trivial as you think. The issues surrounding beauty—how we define it, how we react to it, and the lengths to which we’ll go to achieve it—are very serious indeed.

  • bacteria

    Frenemies

    They may be microscopic, but bacteria wield tremendous power over our health and well-being. Meet the Carls who seek to uncover the mysteries of bacteria and determine how we can make them our friends.

  • climbing the family tree

    Climbing the Family Tree

    Genealogy is hot, hot, hot. These Carls show us how and tell us why we should uncover and preserve our family history before it’s too late.

  • Reunion 2014

    Reunion 2014

    Every summer more than 2,000 Carls return to catch up with old friends and faculty members, visit their favorite campus haunts and discover new ones, and remember all the reasons they’ll always love this place. And we couldn’t be happier they’re here.

  • Stealing Secrets

    Stealing Secrets

    “It wasn’t something we wanted to do. It was just that nobody in Washington was willing to do what they were supposed to do.”

  • Monika Heller Roots ’02

    The Electric Brain

    “You’ll have a computer that will be able to understand you. The better you concentrate, the faster the computer will know what you want.”

  • Jessica Rosenblatt ’04

    The Game Changers

    “It was hard at first to convince corporate bigwigs that there was value in developing games for personal use. The idea that these devices would become things people wanted in their homes was a surprise.”

  • Ivette Feliciano ’05

    Confronting Privilege

    “We will never be smart enough to not have biases. We’re never going to be educated enough that we don’t need to have diversity training or conversations about privilege anymore.”

  • Russia

    Mother Russia's Chilly Embrace

    “It is not enough to celebrate the national holidays of various groups and recognize their different traditions. Will this help bring about mutual understanding? I seriously doubt it.”

  • Science Meets Fiction

    Science Meets Fiction

    "Curiosity wound its way over to Yellowknife Bay and then to Mount Sharp, and both were stunning. I wish I were there to see it with my own eyes, but this is pretty good."

  • Goodsell Observatory

    Putting Carleton on the Celestial Map

    The final telescope, a 16.2-inch Brashear refractor purchased for $15,000 (more than $390,000 in today’s dollars), was made by Pittsburgh’s famed John Brashear Company, arrived in 1890, and was placed beneath the larger dome.

  • Havana, Cuba

    Terms of Engagement

    “The scope took everyone by surprise. Very few people expected there to be a total change in the United States’ relationship with Cuba.”

  • surgical instruments

    How Does It Feel?

    “There was always danger lurking in the background, and you never knew what could happen. But I was having a good time.”

  • California farmers market

    The Kale Effect

    “I would rather buy better food locally, and if I only get asparagus for three weeks in June, that’s okay because that’s when it tastes wonderful. Then I wait for it again.”

  • Dick Garbisch ’38

    Reunion 2016

    With a record turnout, great weather, and a kickoff celebration for Carleton’s sesquicentennial (1866–2016), Reunion 2016 was packed full of nostalgia and fun.

  • Arriving

    A Sesquicentennial Celebration

    A lot changes in 150 years. This commemorative issue looks back at where we’ve been and suggests where we might go from here.

  • Carleton Presidents Edwards, Lewis, Oden, and Poskanzer

    View from the Top

    “College is just the beginning of a joyful mission. One can always go on learning. And it seems to me that Carleton faculty members have kept that joy present at Carleton.”

  • Trompe l’oeil of a train tunnel within the Carleton tunnels.

    The Carleton Tunnels: A (Fictional) History

    “Did I mention that the tunnels are still featured in Carleton’s recruiting brochure? They sold me on tunnels, and now there are no tunnels. Just saying.”

  • John Hassett with Skinner Chapel

    Anniversary Presents

    “Goodsell is round; and Legos, of course, are not.”

  • Timeline (detail)

    The Life of Carleton

    150 years at a glance.

  • Bob McFadden ’66 and Michelle Mastrianni ’16

    Generation Gap

    Members of the Classes of 1966 and 2016 compare notes about their college experiences.

  • Laurence McKinley Gould

    Faculty Legends

    150 years of great Carleton teachers.

  • A Party for the Ages

    A Party for the Ages

    “Providence has worked all things for good. We are here to toast the enduring success of my exceedingly fine college, after all!”

  • SS Carleton Victory

    The Carleton of the Seas

    “Carleton’s first offspring of the sea is a well built, fast ship manned by a competent, far above average captain and crew.”

  • Souvenirs and programs, 1915

    Thanks for the Memories

    In the days before Facebook and Instagram, Carleton students preserved and shared their memories in scrapbooks.

  • Laura Viers ’97, Neko Case, and k.d. lang

    On the Right Track

    “I found out that Neko Case got the same request. That’s when I seriously thought, ‘Wait, are you sure you want us to do this?’ ”

  • Grace Strome ’11

    10 Letters a Day

    “It’s not ‘us versus them’ or ‘liberal versus conservative,’ as people try to make it. We all have different experiences, and that makes us interpret the world through different truths.”

  • If Kids Ruled the World

    A Drawing a Day

    “The people in this world are open-minded and curious. They inspire me.”

  • Dream of the Red Chamber

    Dream Come True

    Dream is a cultural experience for the audience, and you don’t need to be Chinese to appreciate it.”

  • Bunny Shadow

    Cover Images

    Monsters on Parade: The fantastical world of illustrator David Huyck ’98

  • President James Woodward Strong

    Hail to the Chief

    Eleven presidents have led Carleton through its first 150 years.

  • Acorns and oak leaf

    Sesquicentennial Poetry

    This is the poem I could not write,
    the one that is still in my mind…

  • Vintage Class Notes

    Vintage Class Notes

    A Selection of Alumni News from Past Issues of the Voice

  • Fine Fellows

    Fine Fellows

    “The agencies get access to bright people they might not otherwise meet, and we get Omaha on people’s radar. It’s a wonderful community.”

  • Brit Fryer ’15

    True Brit

    “It’s not a movie about a black trans person. It’s more about a crisis of self, and thinking through ‘Is this who I am?’ ”

  • Naomi Kritzer ’95

    A Guide to Social Media Science

    “Plenty of articles with sciencey headlines are nonscience, pseudoscience, or only barely science.”

  • Eugenie Tsai ’76

    View Finders

    “Our field raises a lot of questions about what is art, as well as a lot of challenges for presenting and preserving work.”

  • Bailey Ulbricht ’15

    A Kind Word

    “Many of these Syrians had never even talked to an American, and now they could make a connection over education. That is valuable in so many ways—both culturally and, potentially, politically.”

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